May We Suggest?

May We Suggest?This blog provides customized book recommendations to our patrons. To get your own, just fill out the May We Suggest form and you can expect results within 10 days. You can also like May We Suggest on facebook.

"You know you've read a good book when you turn the last page and feel a little as if you have lost a friend."--Paul Sweeney

 

"Two FBI agents go undercover in the bureau's first wire-wearing operation, and end up befriending the charismatic con man they're charged with bringing down"--.

Also available in: e-book

A revolutionary new appraisal of the Old West and the America it made The open range cattle era lasted barely a quarter-century, but it left America irrevocably changed. These few decades following the Civil War brought America its greatest boom-and-bust cycle until the Depression, the invention of the assembly line, and the dawn of the conservation movement. It inspired legends, such as that icon of rugged individualism, the cowboy. Yet this extraordinary time and its import have remained unexamined for decades. Cattle Kingdom reveals the truth of how the West rose and fell, and how its legacy defines us today. The tale takes us from dust-choked cattle drives to the unlikely splendors of boomtowns like Abilene, Kansas, and Cheyenne, Wyoming. We venture from the Texas Panhandle to the Dakota Badlands to the Chicago stockyards. We meet a diverse array of players--from the expert cowboy Teddy Blue to the failed rancher and future president Teddy Roosevelt. Knowlton shows us how they and others like them could achieve so many outsized feats: killing millions of bison in a decade, building the first opera house on the open range, driving cattle by the thousand, and much more. Cattle Kingdom is a revelatory new view of the Old West.

In rememberance of the men and women who have served our country in war, a collection of fiction and non-fiction reading suggestions.  Some are stories of war others are about the aftermath, of returning home.

In Al Tafar, Iraq, twenty-one-year old Private Bartle and eighteen-year-old Private Murphy's platoon battles for the city; they do everything to protect each other from insurgents, physical fatigue, and the mental stress that comes from constant danger.

In 1990, President George H.W. Bush declared the month of November as "National American Indian Heritage Month", which has come to be commonly referred to as Native American Heritage Month. By either name it is a time of "recognition for the significant contributions the first Americans made to the establishment and growth of the U.S." The Library's collection is a great place to look for materials about Native Americans and their place in our country's history.

Enjoy Game of Thrones?   Political intrigue?   Collusion?  Politicking? Fantasy? or Historical Fiction? Try these.

The black prism by Brent Weeks

THE BLACK PRISM begins an action-packed tale of magic and adventure . . . Guile is the Prism, the most powerful man in the world. He is high priest and emperor, a man whose power, wit, and charm are all that preserves a tenuous peace. Yet Prisms never last, and Guile knows exactly how long he has left to live. When Guile discovers he has a son, born in a far kingdom after the war that put him in power, he must decide how much he's willing to pay to protect a secret that could tear his world apart.

Fool's assassin by Robin Hobb

"FitzChivalry--royal bastard and former king's assassin--has left his life of court intrigue at Buckkeep far behind. As far as the rest of the world knows, FitzChivalry Farseer is dead and buried. Masquerading as Tom Badgerlock, Fitz is now married and leading the quiet life of a country squire with his beloved Molly. The only fly in the ointment is the disappearance of his beloved childhood friend, the Fool, with whom he once shared so much. But for a former royal assassin, a quiet life is hard to maintain when old allegiances keep trying to pull him back, and new enemies come calling.."--.

Death features in everyone's life, in one way or another. There are many books that discuss small-d death. But occasionally Death himself (sometimes herself) takes center stage. One lovely picture book that features Death as a character can be found on MeL: Death, Duck, and the Tulip by Wolf Erlbruch. More books in which the reader meets Death can be found below.

Jack Death by M. L. Windsor

Jack and Nadine, two ordinary kids with pretty unusual parents, live in a place inhabited by magical creatures with a big problem after a villain destroys the Magical Creature Reserve, releasing some ghastly creatures into their midst.

The Tales of Beedle the Bard, a Wizarding classic, first came to Muggle readers' attention in the book known as Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Now, thanks to Hermione Granger's new translation from the ancient runes, we present this stunning edition with an introduction, notes, and illustrations by J. K. Rowling, and extensive commentary by Albus Dumbledore. Never before have Muggles been privy to these richly imaginative tales.

Asylum by Madeleine Roux

"Three teens at a summer program for gifted students uncover shocking secrets in the sanatorium-turned-dorm where they're staying--secrets that link them all to the asylum's dark past"--.

The dead house by Dawn Kurtagich

Told through journal entries, a psychotherapist's notes, court records, and more, relates the tale of Carly, a teen who was institutionalized after her parents' death but released to Elmbrige High School, where she is believed to have a second personality or soul named Kaitlyn, and/or be possessed by a demon.

The girl from the well by Rin Chupeco

Okiku has wandered the world for centuries, freeing the innocent ghosts of the murdered-dead and taking the lives of killers with the vengeance they are due, but when she meets Tark she knows the moody teen with the series of intricate tattoos is not a monster and needs to be freed from the demonic malevolence that clings to him.

If you're looking to pick up a story about family, give one of these a try. Many of them highlight a challenge facing a particular family, or emphasize family connections. All of these titles are also available in audio book formats, which make them uniquely suited to family reading.

Clementine by Sara Pennypacker
Also available in: e-book | audiobook

While sorting through difficulties in her friendship with her neighbor Margaret, eight-year-old Clementine gains several unique hairstyles while also helping her father in his efforts to banish pigeons from the front of their apartment building.

Also available in: e-book | audiobook

A young boy in Concord, Massachusetts, who loves superheroes and comes from a long line of brave Chinese farmer-warriors, wants to make friends, but first he must overcome his fear of everything.

There's nothing like a good witchy tale to get in the mood for Halloween. The best witches have a practical head on their shoulders and a good sense of humor, and make for interesting and exciting stories. Here are a few favorites.

Castle Hangnail by Ursula Vernon
Also available in: e-audiobook

When little, twelve-year-old Molly arrives at Castle Hangnail to fill the vacancy for a wicked witch, the minions who dwell there have no choice but to give her the job and at first it seems she will be able to keep the castle open, but Molly has quite a few secrets that could cause trouble. Molly is sweet and spunky, but will she be able to overcome her faults?

Traces the story of dancer-turned-magician Adelaide Herrmann, placing her achievements against a backdrop of period conventions about women in the arts and her determination to continue her work after the death of her husband. This is a true story of a woman determined to make it in a magician's world.

“The benefits of reading books include a longer life in which to read them.”  –A. Bashivi, M. D. Slade, B. R. Levy. (Social Science & Medicine. Vol 164. Sept, 2016)

 Jeremy Black offers a historian's interpretation from the perspective of the late 2010s, assessing James Bond in terms of the greatly changing world order of the Bond years--a lifetime that stretches from 1953, when the first novel appeared, to the present. Black argues that the Bond novels--the Fleming books as well as the often-neglected novels authored by others after Fleming died in 1964--and films drew on current fears in order to reduce the implausibility of the villains and their villainy.  Class, place, gender, violence, sex, race--all are themes that Black scrutinizes through the ongoing shifts in characterization and plot. His well-informed and well-argued analysis provides a fascinating history of the enduring and evolving appeal of James Bond.

Also available in: e-book

"In An Extraordinary Time, acclaimed economic historian Marc Levinson recounts the global collapse of the postwar economy in the 1970s. While economists struggle to return us to the high economic growth rates of the past, Levinson counterintuitively argues that the boom years of the 1950s and 1960s were an anomaly; slow economic growth is the norm-no matter what economists and politicians may say. Yet these atypical years left the public with unreasonable expectations of what government can achieve. When the economy failed to revive, suspicion of government and liberal institutions rose sharply, laying the groundwork for the political and economic polarization that we're still grappling with today. A sweeping reappraisal of the last sixty years of world history, An Extraordinary Time describes how the postwar economic boom dissipated, undermining faith in government, destabilizing the global financial system, and forcing us to come to terms with how tumultuous our economy really is"--.

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