History

Travel Back in Time to Pre-Civil War America

What Day was That?

Travel back in time and learn about some of the most memorable days in world history:

America's jubilee by Andrew Burstein — July 4, 1826

D-Day, June 6, 1944: the climactic battle of World War II by Stephen E. Ambrose — June 6, 1944

The day Kennedy was shot by Jim Bishop — November 22, 1963

The day Lincoln was shot by Jim Bishop — April 14, 1865

Day of infamy by Walter Lord — December 7, 1941

Presidential Time Travel

Travel back through America's history and learn more about America's 44 presidents and their families:

America's first families: an inside view of 200 years of private life in the White House by Carl Sferrazza Anthony

Dear First Lady: letters to the White House by [compiled and edited] by Dwight Young and Margaret Johnson; foreword by Helen Thomas

First fathers: the men who inspired our Presidents by Harold I. Gullan

First ladies: from Martha Washington to Michelle Obama by Betty Boyd Caroli

First mothers: the women who shaped the presidents by Bonnie Angelo

You Are There!

Jump into the Wayback Machine and be there when history was being made!

Days of destiny: crossroads in American history: America's greatest historians examine thirty-one uncelebrated days that changed the course of history by general editors, James M. McPherson, Alan Brinkley; editor, David Rubel

Eyewitness to America: 500 years of America in the words of those who saw it happen by edited by David Colbert

Eyewitness to history by edited by John Carey

I wish I'd been there: twenty historians bring to life dramatic events that changed America by edited by Byron Hollinshead

Historical "What Ifs"

What if the Allied invasion of Europe on D-Day had failed? The Mayflower had not sailed? The Mongols had succeeded in conquering Europe? JFK hadn't been assassinated? Napoleon had invaded North America? The South had won the Civil War? Go back in time and reimagine history as it might have been with the following fascinating titles:

Almost America: from the colonists to Clinton: a 'what if' history of the U.S. by Steve Tally

Almost history: close calls, plan B's, and twists of fate in American history by Roger Bruns

The Confederate States of America: what might have been by Roger L. Ransom

The War of 1812 Anniversary

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the beginning of the War of 1812. It was on June 18, 1812 that the United States declared war on Great Britain, and although it is arguably one of America's least remembered wars, it was during this time that many legendary battles were fought, heroes made, and memorable events occurred. It was during this war that the British burned the White House and First Lady Dolley Madison helped to save several valuable items — such as George Washington's portrait and original drafts of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. It was during this war that Francis Scott Key wrote the Star Spangled Banner at Fort McHenry.

Meet the Women of the Civil War

Diamond Jubilee

England's Queen Elizabeth II celebrates her Diamond Jubilee this year, commemorating 60 years on the British throne. Her reign is the second longest for a British monarch after Queen Victoria who reigned for 63 years and 7 months. Princess Elizabeth was crowned on June 2, 1953 at Westminster Abbey after the death of her father George VI. Although she had been proclaimed queen when her father died in February, 1952, the official ceremony was not held until after a period of mourning for the late king. She was 26 years of age when she ascended the throne — the first coronation to be televised. To learn more about Queen Elizabeth and the royal family check out some the following items from the Library's collection:

Elizabeth the Queen: the life of a modern monarch by Sally Bedell Smith

Time was, Time is… June 2012

The Golden Gate Bridge Turns 75

San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge turns 75 on May 27. On that day in 1937 over 200,000 people crossed the bridge on foot and roller skates. The bridge links the City of San Francisco with Marin County. Singer Tony Bennett immortalized the Golden Gate Bridge in the song "(I Left My Heart) In San Francisco". Construction on the bridge began on January 5, 1933 and ultimately cost $35million. Take a virtual walk across the bridge, read about the history of this world famous bridge, or watch the Golden Gate Bridge being constructed.

Golden Gate Bridge [videodisc] by a Ben Loeterman Productions, Inc. film

The bridge [videodisc] by executive producers Alison Palmer Bourke & Evan Shapiro; produced and directed by Eric Steel

The Golden Gate Bridge by James Barter

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