History

Woman Suffrage Parade of 1913

This year is the 100th anniversary of the Woman Suffrage Parade organized by the suffragist Alice Paul. On March 3, 1913 more than 5,000 participants - including such notables as Helen Keller - marched down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C. in support of granting women the right to vote. However, it wasn't until August 26, 1920, with the passage of the 19th Amendment, that American women finally attained that goal.

One woman, one vote [videodisc] by an Educational Film Center production for the American Experience ; WGBH Educational Foundation ; WGBH Boston ; written and produced by Ruth Pollak ; co-producer and writer, Felicia M. Widmann

Generations [videodisc]: American women win the vote by Vote 70 Project, Inc

25 Extraordinary Women

Celebrate Women's History Month by reading about one of the fascinating women below.
 

Madam Secretary by Madeleine Albright, with Bill Woodward — Madeleine Albright, Ambassador, first woman to become United States Secretary of State

 

 

Arbella: England's lost queen by Sarah Gristwood — Arbella, English Renaissance noblewoman

 

 

 

Eighty days: Nellie Bly and Elizabeth Bisland's history- making race around the world by Matthew Goodman — Nellie Bly, American journalist

 

 

 

Book Club Choices March 2013

In honor of St. Patrick’s Day (March 17), think about reading an Irish author or about Irish history.

American skin: a novel by Ken Bruen

Skippy dies by Paul Murray

Minding Frankie by Maeve Binchy

I'll know it when I see it: a daughter's search for home in Ireland by Alice Carey

Anybody out there? by Marian Keyes

Native American Dancers for Mother Earth

Celebrate Mother Earth with authentic Native American Dancers led by Reg Pettibone. To wrap up our week-long Earth Week activities, we welcome the Native American Dancers who will entertain us in a very special way on Saturday, April 27 at 2:00 PM. Everyone is welcome to see the beautiful, colorful costumes and the outstanding dance moves that praise our planet.

Hurrah for Hollywood!

Sunday, February 24 is the 85th Oscar Awards.  Brush up on your film history with...

The Hollywood sign: fantasy and reality of an American icon by Leo Braudy

Pictures at a revolution: five movies and the birth of the new Hollywood by Mark Harris

The big screen: the story of the movies by David Thomson

The inventor and the tycoon: a Gilded Age murder and the birth of moving pictures by Edward Ball

Treasures from American film archives [videodisc]: 50 preserved films by producer, National Film Preservation Foundation ; curator, Scott Simmon ; music curator, Martin Marks

Dateline 1863!

The year 1863 was a particularly memorable one in both American and world history. It was 150 years ago that the world's first underground railroad opened in London; the dome of the United States Capitol was finished; the National Academy of Sciences was created; both Arizona Territory and Idaho Territory were created; West Virginia was admitted to the Union; Jules Verne published Five Weeks in a Ballon; and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow first published the poem Paul Revere's Ride. It was also the midpoint of the Civil War. Read about some of the other memorable events of that year below:

Presidents Day

Instead of going to the mall for the Presidents Day sale, you can really celebrate by brushing up on some presidential history. A great place to start is the Internet Public Library's POTUS which provides biographical information, historical documents, and audio and video files. If this doesn't satisfy your historical sweet tooth, check out Public Papers of the Presidents at the American Presidency Project which has digitized over 85,000 documents related to the Presidency, including audio and video. Still not enough? The Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections contains detailed national results of all U.S. presidential elections since 1789. And if you want to compare today's presidential campaigns with those of the recent past, browse the Museum of the Moving Image's site The Living Room Candidate where you can find more than 300 commericals from every presidential elections since 1952. Of course, the library has many great books on the presidents — both biographies of individual presidents and histories of the office.

Women Who Changed America

In celebration of Women's History Month, we are pleased to host two luminaries from our past:  former first lady Mary Todd Lincoln and famous author Beatrix Potter.  Re-enactor Marie Papciak will bring these two famous women to life in her presentation.  With over 30 years of experience, Ms. Papciak will bring the characters to life to the delight of children and adults alike on Saturday, March 16 at 2:00 PM.  No registration is required.  

Richard III Remains Found

The remains of Richard III, King of England 1483-1485 have been found under a parking The earliest surviving portrait of Richard (c. 1520, after a lost original), formerly belonging to the Paston family.lot in Leicester, UK.  They have been positively identified by comparing DNA with two descendents of Richard's sister.  The remains have been missing for over 500 years.  Following the Battle of Bosworth Field where Richard III was killed, his remains were unceremoniously dumped without a marker.  (Image: The earliest surviving portrait of Richard (c. 1520, after a lost original), formerly belonging to the Paston family Society of Antiquaries, London)

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