May We Suggest?

May We Suggest?This blog provides customized book recommendations to our patrons. To get your own, just fill out the May We Suggest form and you can expect results within 10 days. You can also like May We Suggest on facebook.

May is Mental Health Awareness Month. Below is a collection of graphic novels and illustrated works that paint our thoughts and emotions beyond words, offer art as therapy, and help inform us in new ways. 

 

Did you miss our What's Different? What's the Same? Storytime this week? Don't worry, here's what you missed, plus a few more suggestions so you can create your own storytime at home, complete with songs and stories.

Don't need a full storytime? Borrow a rhyme when you need a short distraction, or check out these materials and spend a few minutes reading together.

From Storytime

Dino duckling by Alison Murray

Did you miss our Duck Storytime this week? Don't worry, here's what you missed, plus a few more suggestions so you can create your own storytime at home, complete with songs and stories.

Don't need a full storytime? Borrow a rhyme when you need a short distraction, or check out these materials and spend a few minutes reading together.

From Storytime

Ducks away! by Mem Fox

Sunday on May 12 is when we hit the pause button on our busy lives and take a moment to appreciate our mothers and motherhood. Mothers have a profound value in our lives and in many ways have the most challenging, greatest and toughest job in the world. They give us an abundance of unconditional love, support and acceptance. Mothers are our tireless cheerleader for every milestone we experience. Check out these new books celebrating the joys and challenges of motherhood. 

With This Is Motherhood, the cofounders and contributors of the Motherly online community present a collection of essays and practices to celebrate motherhood in all its complexity. Here you'll find reflections on each phase of "the wild ride of motherhood," including the soaring highs of meeting your new baby, the ground-shaking lows that make you doubt everything you've ever known, and all the beauty and pain in between. Each chapter closes with practices from Motherly's team of wellness experts to help you define, clarify, process, and celebrate your journey.

Slow down and take time for yourself--because a better you is a better mom! The second book in the Hot Mess to Mindful Mom series, Get the Most out of Motherhood will help moms create balance, peace, and well-being in their homes, leaving behind their old ways of being constantly stressed-out and frantic. In the first book, Ali focused on internal issues and taught women that by caring for themselves first, they can better care for their families and loved ones. This book is the natural next step for moms who now understand that a better you equals a better mom! She will guide women on how to embrace their best selves while parenting so they can strengthen relationships with their children, create systems in their homes that work, and actually enjoy doing it.

 

Did you miss our Rocket Storytime this week? Don't worry, here's what you missed, plus a few more suggestions so you can create your own out of this world storytime at home, complete with songs and stories.

Don't need a full storytime? Borrow a rhyme when you need a short distraction, or check out these materials and spend a few minutes reading together.

From Storytime

Interstellar Cinderella by Deborah Underwood
Also available in: e-book

Sometimes feelings happen one and a time and sometimes they gang up on us. In our Emotions themed storytime, we talked about all the feels and what we do when what we feel is sad or mad. Enjoy!

Stories and Songs from Storytime

Starting April 26 through May 3, it's National Infant Immunization Week! Since 1994, National Infant Immunization Week has focused on the vital role vaccination plays in disease prevention. Vaccines safely protect our children and communities against contagious diseases. According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control), the number of reported cases of measles has reached its highest number in the United States since the disease was eradicated in 2000. Michigan is one of 22 states experiencing a measles outbreak. Stay informed by consulting with your doctor and for some perspective on the history of viral diseases, here's some resources from our health collection.    

Smallpox, yellow fever, malaria, and polio, fearful diseases that once beset Americans, are now largely, just unhappy history. Yet from our confrontations with these past plagues come lessons that inform today's struggles to understand and remedy problems like HIV/AIDS, coronary heart disease, and Ebola infection. American Plagues weaves stories of encounters with epidemics over our history with lessons that aid our present understanding of health and disease. Doctors and clergy, writers and newsmen, public health institutions, and even an entire town relate their personal experiences with various outbreaks and the ways they were identified, contained, and treated. The stories are filled with ambition and accomplishment, jealousy and disappointment, public spirit and self-interest, egotism and modesty. Some episodes lead to vital discoveries. Others were unproductive. Yet each proved instructive and expanded our abilities to gather and process information in ways that improve medicine and public health today. American Plagues gives readers insights into some of the people and events that make up our rich public health history as well as skills to better grasp the complex health information that cascades upon us from the media.

Ever since we started huddling together in communities, the story of human history has been inextricably entwined with the story of microbes. They have evolved and spread amongst us, shaping our culture through infection, disease, and pandemic. At the same time, our changing human culture has itself influenced the evolutionary path of microbes. Dorothy H. Crawford here shows that one cannot be truly understood without the other. Beginning with a dramatic account of the SARS pandemic at the start of the twenty-first century, she takes us back in time to follow the interlinked history of microbes and man, taking an up-to-date look at ancient plagues and epidemics, and identifying key changes in the way humans have lived-such as our move from hunter-gatherer to farmer to city-dweller-which made us vulnerable to microbe attack. Showing how we live our lives today-with increasing crowding and air travel-puts us once again at risk, Crawford asks whether we might ever conquer microbes completely, or whether we need to take a more microbe-centric view of the world. Among the possible answers, one thing becomes clear: that for generations to come, our deadly companions will continue to shape human history.

Did you miss our Orange Storytime this week? Don't worry, here's what you missed, plus a few more suggestions so you can create your own colorful storytime at home, complete with songs and stories.

Don't need a full storytime? Borrow a rhyme when you need a short distraction, or check out these materials and spend a few minutes reading together.

From Storytime

Who eats orange? by Dianne White

Who eats orange--a chicken? A bunny? A bear? Animals eat a rainbow of different foods. Young animal enthusiasts will love digging into this lively journey around the world to explore the colorful diets of many animals, from the familiar to the exotic.

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