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Science

Holiday Fun with a Michigan Activities Pass

Looking for family activities during the holiday break? Library patrons can use their library card online to print a pass allowing them complimentary or reduced cost access to arts and cultural organizations across the state. Canton Public Library card holders may login to print a pass at the MAP website.

Saturday STEM Science Time

Mix up a little science, some technology, engineering and math and what do you get?  A fun way for families and children in grades K-4 to learn new things.  Join us as we use the scientific method to ask a question, do a little research, make a guess, do an experiment, and discuss the results.  Saturday, January 31, 2015, 3:00-4:00 PM. Registration is required.

Dr. Science by J D Hancock is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Engineering Gingerbread

Families and kids in grades K-4 can practice engineering and architectural skills building an edible gingerbread house.  Add your imagination and artistic skills to our big cardboard gingerbread house too.  All supplies will be provided.  Thursday, December 18, 2014, 7:00-8:00 PM.  Registration is required.

Gingerbread House by White 77 under CC0 1.0 Universal

Thorndyke Thoughts: History Mysteries

Hey Kids,

One of my librarian friends told me about an event where she heard Marc Aronson give a talk about history. That might sound boring, but he wasn’t just talking about names and dates. If you like mysteries, investigations, questions and answers, following clues, and challenging what other people think, then you might like to try some of his books. Usually he writes for upper elementary (4th and 5th grades) or for middle schoolers, but your parents might even like these.

Ain't nothing but a man: my quest to find the real John Henry by Scott Reynolds Nelson with Marc Aronson — If you’ve heard of Paul Bunyan, maybe you’ve also heard of John Henry, the legendary man who beat a steam drill. Did you know he was a real person? In this story Scott Nelson tells about his discoveries of John Henry, the real man.

The griffin and the dinosaur: how Adrienne Mayor discovered a fascinating link between myth and science by Marc Aronson with Adrienne Mayor ; illustrated by Chris Muller — Dinosaurs have fascinated people for a long time, but even before people knew there were dinosaurs, they had found their bones and made up stories of what they must have been like.

Savvy Seniors: November 2014

November is American Diabetes Month.  Diabetes disproportionately affects older adults. Approximately 25% of Americans over the age of 60 years have diabetes, and aging of the U.S. population is widely acknowledged as one of the drivers of the diabetes epidemic. 


Diabetes rescue diet: conquer diabetes naturally while eating and drinking what you love—even chocolate and wine! by Mark Bricklin

There is a cure for diabetes: the 21-day+ holistic recovery program by Gabriel Cousens ; forewords by Sandra Rose Michael and Brian R. Clement

The American Diabetes Association vegetarian cookbook: satisfying, bold, and flavorful recipes from the garden by Chef Steven Petusevsky, author of The Whole Foods Market Cookbook

Type 2 diabetes [videodisc]: a case for cardiovascular intervention by produced in cooperation with the American Association of Diabetes Educators

What We're Reading: November, 2014

An event in autumn by Henning Mankell ; translated from the Swedish by Laurie Thompson.  Fans of Mankell's Swedish detective, Kurt Wallander, will enjoy this story set just before Wallander's final case. 

The teacher wars: a history of America's most embattled profession by Dana Goldstein.  Everyone has an opinion about America's public schools and the responsibility of its' teachers. Would you be surprised to learn teachers have been similarly embattled for nearly two centuries?

A share in death by Deborah Crombie. This is the first in Crombie's long running Duncan Kincaid/Gemma James series.  It's been on my To Read list for awhile and I thought it's time had come. Nominated for an Agatha Award.

Drop In for Aviation History Month

Drop in at the library to explore and learn a bit about airplanes and the folks who fly them for Aviation History Month. Enjoy independent activities, including making a paper airplane to test.

Sunday, November 2 @ 12:00-2:00 PM
No registration required.

All Kinds of Bugs for Kids

Ultimate bugopedia: the most complete bug reference ever by Darlyne Murawski & Nancy Honovich

Behold the beautiful dung beetle by Cheryl Bardoe ; illustrated by Alan Marks

The secret life of the woolly bear caterpillar by illustrated by Joan Paley ; Laurence Pringle

Noisy bug sing-along by John Himmelman

Weird insects by Michael Worek

Handle with care: an unusual butterfly journey by Loree Griffin Burns ; photographs by Ellen Harasimowicz

Bird Books for the Young at Heart

Parrots over Puerto Rico by Susan L. Roth and Cindy Trumbore ; collages by Susan L. Roth

Do you really want a bird? by Bridget Heos ; illustrated by Katya Longhi

Have you heard the nesting bird? by words by Rita Gray ; pictures by Kenard Pak

Mama built a little nest by Jennifer Ward ; illustrated by Steve Jenkins

For the birds: the life of Roger Tory Peterson by Peggy Thomas ; illustrated by Laura Jacques

Owls by Valerie Bodden

Informational Books for Preschoolers

Plymouth Canton Community Schools Early Childhood staff developed this list of recommended information books for Preschoolers looking for something factual and fun. For the original list of 100 books, open the attachment at the bottom of this post. Items currently included in the library catalog are listed below. Click on the titles for availability.

ALL ABOUT ME

Bread comes to life: a garden of wheat and a loaf to eat by George Levenson ; photography by Shmuel Thaler

Eyes, nose, fingers and toes: a first book about you by Judy Hindley ; illustrated by Brita Granström

Families by Ann Morris

The little brainwaves investigate— human body by [written and edited by Caroline Bingham] ; illustrated by Lisa Swerling and Ralph Lazar

Investigate, Experiment, and Create

Many of our science experiment books are grouped together in our nonfiction section (J507.8). Here are a few to get you started this summer. Get the whole family in on your experiments!

Citizen scientists: be a part of scientific discovery from your own backyard by Loree Griffin Burns ; photographs by Ellen Harasimowicz

Things that float and things that don't by David A. Adler ; illustrated by Anna Raff

The big green book of the big blue sea by written by Helaine Becker ; illustrated by Willow Dawson

Star Wars science fair book by Samantha Margles

Creative Sites for Summer

Explore your creativity online.

The Artist's Toolkit: Visual Elements and Principles
Learn about elements of art and try your hand at creating some art of your own.

Create shapes and patterns that mingle with sound (see image at right).

See how fierce you can make your own roller coaster. Links to other activities.

Get creative with items from your pantry and make some concoctions that have nothing to do with food.

Try your hand at different puzzles.

Mysteries and Secrets of Science for Kids

Underworld: exploring the secret world beneath your feet by written by Jane Price ; illustrated by James Gulliver Hancock

The secret life of the woolly bear caterpillar by illustrated by Joan Paley ; Laurence Pringle

The secret pool by Kimberly Ridley ; illustrated by Rebekah Raye

The mystery of Darwin's frog by Marty Crump ; illustrations by Steve Jenkins and Edel Rodriguez

Is there life on Mars? by Michael Portman

TV shows about science… Or, if you like Cosmos…

The new Cosmos series with Neil deGrasse Tyson just wrapped up, so here are some suggestions for you to get your astrophysical fix.

Cosmos. Episode I [videodisc]: a personal journey by Cosmos Studios

What makes us human? [videodisc] by PBS

A brief history of time [videodisc] by directed by Errol Morris

400 years of the telescope [videodisc]: a journey of science, technology and thought by producer and director, Kris Koenig

The inexplicable universe [videodisc]: unsolved mysteries by Neil deGrasse Tyson

The universe. The complete season five [videodisc] by produced by Flight 33 Productions for History Television Network productions

STEM Science: Lead the way

Local high school student Maha Zahid recognized that when entering high school many of her friends were struggling with the application of basic science concepts. As a result, she developed a science enrichment program geared towards middle school students (grades 6th- 8th) who strive to get a head start in their high school science experience and gain more knowledge of innovative careers options in the field of medicine and engineering. This program will focus on fundamental science concepts including chemistry, biochemistry, cells, human body systems and physics that are beneficial for students to know before entering high school. With every concept students will complete hands on activities that will enrich their learning experience. This is an 8 week program that will run every Friday from 4:00-5:45 PM. The first session takes place on June 27 and the last is on August 15. Registration begins May 26 and space is limited!

Green Opportunities in the City of Detroit

In honor of Earth Week, which includes Earth Day and Arbor Day, we will have representatives from The Greening of Detroit on hand to discuss what they are doing to transform the physical, and metaphorical, landscape of Detroit. For over two decades, this non-profit organization has been instrumental in spear-heading green initiatives, most notably the repatriation of trees, in conjunction with the City of Detroit and Detroit Public Schools. If you are interested in learning about an innovative and fun project focused on the revitalization of the city, and how you can get involved, please join us on April 24 from 7:00-8:00 PM for this event. There will be the opportunity to sign up for tree-planting and park clean-up volunteer activities as well as enroll in the Citizen Forester program. Check out the Greening on Channel 7 News and in the Detroit Free Press. See the attached document for more details.

UoM Family Reading and Science Program III

This program is part of the University of Michigan Museum of Natural History series Predators and Prey: The Eternal Struggle. On Saturday, March 15 from 2:00-3:00 PM, participants aged 6-11 years old (with their caregiver) will explore the world of dinosaurs. Titled "Present Day Predators and Prey: Maintaining the balance", participants will find out what can happen if the food chain comes undone? In the circle of life there is a delicate balance of predators and prey, each keeping the other in check. This workshop will explore how we monitor the health of those relationships and what we can do to maintain the balance. Registration begins on February 24.

STEM Science: Lead the Way

Local high school student Maha Zahid recognized that when entering high school many of her friends were struggling with the application of basic science concepts. As a result, she developed a science enrichment program geared towards middle school students (grades 6th- 8th) who strive to get a head start in their high school science experience and gain more knowledge of innovative careers options in the field of medicine and engineering. This program will focus on fundamental science concepts including chemistry, biochemistry, cells, human body systems and physics that are beneficial for students to know before entering high school. With every concept students will complete hands on activities that will enrich their learning experience. This is an 8 week program that will run every Friday from 4:00-5:45 PM. The first session takes place on March 7 and the last is on April 18. Registration begins February 21 and space is limited!

UofM Family Reading and Science Program II

This program is part of the University of Michigan Museum of Natural History series Predators and Prey: The Eternal Struggle. On Saturday, February 15 from 2:00-3:00 PM, participants aged 6-11 years old (with their caregiver) will explore the world of dinosaurs. Titled "Meals with Megafauna: Sabertooth Cats, Dire Wolves, Mastodons and Man", participants will find out if humans always been apex predators. The giant mammals of the ice age not only had to worry about the climate but there was a new contender for apex predator status- humans. In this workshop we will examine the rise and fall of the megafauna and human's emerging role as apex predator. Registration begins on Janurary 20.