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History

They could do it!

When the United States entered World War II, American men went into the military and American women filled their places in the offices and factories. "We can do it" was the slogan and Rosie the Riveter was the symbol of these working women. The American Rosie the Riveter Association has gathered together the stories of the "Rosies" and, thanks to a donation by a Rosie, the Canton Library has the set of these books.

Fun History Reads

Looking for some fun history books that won't put you to sleep? Try one of the books in the You Wouldn't Want To series. Each of these books puts you in the place of an average person who lived through some crazy, exciting period in time. From constructing the pyramids to sailing on the Titanic, there's something for everyone. The CPL's newest edition is You Wouldn't Want to be a World War II Pilot! For more information on some of the books in this entertaining series check out the publisher's website.

The Mystery of 2012

According to the plot of a new film being released on November 13, the world will come to an end on December 21, 2012. Supposedly based on the fact that the Mayan calendar "runs out" after that date, there has been a slew of books, articles and websites devoted to this phenomenon - as well as the aforementioned film 2012. So what's it really all about?

World Digital Library

Looking for primary documents? The World Digital Library can help. It contains manuscripts, maps, letters, rare books, recordings, film, photographs and architectural drawings from around the world and in different languages. You can browse their online collection by region, time period, topic, the type of institution that houses the item (like the Library of Congress or the Bibliotheca Alexandrina), or by the type of item. For example, here is a map of British Antarctic expeditions from 1907 to 1909 made by the famous explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton!

HeritageQuest

An excellent Genealogy resource, the HeritageQuest Online includes the U.S. federal censuses from 1790 to 1930, 22,000 digitized family history and local history books, and more than 250 primary-source documents such as tax lists, city directories, probate records, Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty Land Warrant Application Files, the Freedman’s Bank Records, and more.

Polish-American Heritage Month

October is Polish American Heritage Month and your library can help you celebrate! Our International Language Collection features fiction and non-fiction materials written in Polish. Who wouldn't savor, Cooking the Polish Way by Zamojska-Hutchings. Children may enjoy I am Polish American by Samuel Kapowski, about a young boy who talks of his Polish heritage, including foods, customs and famous Poles. If music is more your style our CD collection features Homage to Polish Music and myriad polkas for all. For additional information on Polish Heritage Month visit the Polish American Center.

Unsolved History

One of my favorite things to do in October is curl up with a spooky story. That's why I'm really enjoying Gary Blackwood's Unsolved History series. These books feature true stories of mysterious deaths and unexplainable events throughout history. Full of possible conspiracies and fascinating characters, these books are sure to send a chill down your spine. Stop by the Children's Department's New Book shelf today to check out this series!

Homer & Langley

E.L. Doctorow's latest novel Homer & Langley is based on the true story of the Collyer brothers, notorious for their compulsive hoarding in the first half of the 20th century. The two unemployed siblings lived together for thirty years in their New York City home, where they obsessively collected items such as newspapers, books, furniture, chandeliers, and musical instruments, while at the same time setting booby traps in the hallways to protect against intruders. Their amazing story is often cited as an example of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

Cool New Book Alert

Our copies of Salem High School's Footsteps in History have arrived! Written by students in Darrin Silvester's Michigan History Class, the book tells a fascinating story inspired by the Shearer Cemetery in Plymouth. Dedicated to the children of the Plymouth-Canton community, this is a wonderful story to share with elementary-aged children. Look for the book in the New Book section behind the Children's reference desk.

International Talk Like A Pirate Day

Avast Ye,
'Tis that time a voyage again t' celebrate all things swashbuckling. International Talk Like A Pirate Day be Septembree 19th, but we be celebratin' on both th' 18th an' 19th. Avast by th' library fer some good old gentleman o' fortune fun! Most importantly dasn't forget t' check ou' a sea dog book or two.

Author Bich Minh Nguyen to speak in Plymouth

Author Bich Minh Nguyen, who wrote Stealing Buddha's Dinner will speak at 1 p.m. on Saturday, October 17th at the Penn Theatre in Plymouth.

Nguyen and her family left Vietnam in 1975, and relocated to Michigan. Stealing Buddha's Dinner is a memoir of the author's childhood and experiences of assimilation into American culture. This is Nguyen's only appearance in the Detroit area; and her presentation is not to be missed.

What Libraries Stand For in America

When searching the library shelves for books and movies or stopping in to surf the net on one of the public computers does anyone really stop to think about how the library service was born? Today, most districts, cities and schools contain at least one public library and this can be taken for granted. What some do not realize is the role the library plays in equal opportunity education. The people who can not afford picture books for their children can check them out at the library or the people who can not afford college are given the opportunity to research scholarships.

Hispanic Heritage

National Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated from mid-September through mid-October each year. The resources in this Special Collection provide an introduction to the culture, identity and direction of the diverse population that is Hispanic.

Culture

Arte Latino: Treasures From the Smithsonian American Art Museum by Jonathan Yorba: This book documents 50 Latino artists from the U.S. and Puerto Rico as they explore their identity and influence on U.S. culture over the past two centuries through various media.

Fantastic Origami

We've done it this time! We've got 1000 sheets of origami paper just waiting to be folded at our Fantastic Origami program on Tuesday, September 22 from 5-7pm in the Purple Room. Come learn about Sadako Sasaki and celebrate the International Day of Peace on September 21 by making paper cranes. Registration is now open for third and fourth graders.

The White Queen

Philippa Gregory has done it again! If you enjoyed The Other Boleyn Girl, you will enjoy her newest novel, The White Queen. It takes place earlier than the Tudors and has all the same great elements she is famous for romance, family "scheming" for power, and lots of insight to a period of history you may not have known about. Read it and enjoy!

Edward M. Kennedy

Senator Edward M. Kennedy passed away early this morning after a long battle with cancer. He was 77. Kennedy, nicknamed "Ted," and known as the "Lion of the Senate" was first elected to represent Massachusetts in 1962. He is one of only six senators in U.S. history to serve more than 40 years. Throughout this time he played major roles in the passage of such landmark legislation as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the 1993 Family and Medical Leave Act. He has also been one of the Senate's foremost champions of health care reform. Speaking to reporters after hearing the news of Kennedy's death, President Obama called him "not only one of the greatest senators of our time, but one of the most accomplished Americans ever to serve our democracy."

Pick Up Some Historical Fiction

Every August I look forward to the Ypsilanti Heritage Festival! There's lots of cool crafts for sale, yummy fair food, and a living history area where you can see how 19th century Michiganders lived. Whenever the festival comes, it always makes me want to pick up a good piece of Civil War historical fiction. My favorites are the ones by Ann Rinaldi. She even wrote one about a girl from Michigan who runs off to join the Union Army during the Civil War. There's a ton to choose from at the library, so stop by and give one a try. Happy reading!

Three Days of Peace and Music

"By the time we got to Woodstock, we were half a million strong." Those words, written by Joni Mitchell in her famous song about the event, perfectly captured the feelings about the music festival for those who were there. It was forty years ago on August 15, 1969, that thousands of people gathered in rural Bethel, New York to attend what would become an historic outdoor concert. For those who attended - and even like Mitchell - those who could not, Woodstock became a defining moment.