Black History Month Family Films

Start some family discussions by watching one of these five films.

Remember the Titans — The story of how school integration affects a football team and its coaches.

Akeelah and the bee — Akeelah overcomes a distracting home life to participate in the national spelling bee

The princess and the frog — New Orleans waitress Tiana's plans to own her own restaurant are sidelined by some unusual developments of an amphibian nature.

Ruby Bridges — Dramatization of the real life story of Ruby Bridges, the first child to be integrated into her New Orleans elementary school

Selma, Lord, Selma — Martin Luther King's Selma march is witness through the eyes of a child.

Pinkalicious Easy Reads

Hey kids! Did you know that you can now find Pinkalicious books in the Readers section of the Children's Department? We've got two new titles in this easy-to-read format. Check them out:

Pink around the rink by Victoria Kann

Pinkalicious: school rules by Victoria Kann

So next time you're looking for Pinkalicious books, remember that they're not only in the Picture Books section, and don't forget to check the Readers section!

Library Lovers' Month!

Most people associate February with Valentine's Day, but did you know that February is also Library Lovers' Month? Check out this website to print some great bookmarks, send some online postcards, get library-inspired ideas for things to do with kids, and even see a list of movies involving librarians. Then come visit the library to check them out!

What year is 2011 in Chinese?

The Year of 2011 is the Year of the Golden Rabbit, which begins on February 3, 2011 and ends on January 22, 2012. The Rabbit is the 4th sign in the Chinese zodiac which consists of 12 animals signs. To find your sign, click on China Today web. The Rabbit is a lucky sign. People born in the Year of the Rabbit are reasonably friendly individuals who enjoy the company of a group of good friends. For more information on Chinese horoscopes, see these sources in our library. For information on how Chinese New Year is celebrated, including legends, food, and taboos, see this China Facts page.

Living Book Night

Check out one of our Living Books on February 22. Registration begins on February 8 at which time you can register for a half hour visit (for either the 7:00-7:30PM, 7:30-8:00PM or 8:00-8:30PM time slot) with one of our real, living books! You can register for up to three books as long as the time slots are different. Click on the links below for a live preview:

Google Art Project

The Google Art Project allows the user to tour 17 of the world's most famous museums like Google Street View. Interested in New York's Frick Museum, MOMA, or Versailles? This is a new look at museums which allows you to go from room to room and then select a painting to view. With high-resolution technology you can look at featured paintings in amazing detail. This is a unique resource for the tourist, the student, or the art lover. To learn more about the Google Art Project, check out this article from the New York Times.

Dollars and Sense

Four quick things every citizen should know from Governor Rick Snyder's new Dollars & Sense: How State and Local Governments in Michigan Spend Your Money guide to the public's checkbook. State Treasurer Andy Dillon says Lansing is about to experience "shock therapy."

Author Ariana Franklin's Passing

Just read this in The Rap Sheet:

Late though I am to attending to this matter, I want to acknowledge the passing on Thursday of British novelist Ariana Franklin. Born in Devon and a former Fleet Street journalist, she was the author of four books featuring 12th-century English coroner-investigator Adelia Aguilar (including Mistress of the Art of Death, which won the 2007 Ellis Peters Historical Dagger Award). Her most recent entry in that series was A Murderous Procession (originally published as The Assassin’s Prayer), which came out in the States last year. In addition, Franklin wrote almost a dozen historical novels under her real name, Diana Norman. Earlier this year, she received the Crime Writers’ Association’s Dagger in the Library Award, given 'to an author for a body of work, not one single title.'

Shamrock

Many folks ask, "Why is the Shamrock the National Flower of Ireland?" The reason is that St. Patrick used it to explain the Holy Trinity to the pagans. Saint Patrick is believed to have been born in the late fourth century, and is often confused with Palladius, a bishop who was sent by Pope Celestine in 431 to be the first bishop to the Irish believers in Christ.

Find out more about St. Patrick and Irish History.

Food Reading

Even when I don't feel like cooking I gravitate toward the cookery section of the library. I'm always interested in food and there are so many wonderful books on that subject that rarely list a recipe. The result? Hours spent comtemplating my favorite subject without the guilt of untried recipes haunting me. Just a few of my favorites are:

The man who ate everything : and other gastronomic feats, disputes, and pleasurable pursuits by Jeffrey Steingarten — Vogue food columnist Steingarten writes hilariously about his obessions with food.

Tender at the bone : growing up at the table by Ruth Reichl — Former Editor in Chief of Gourmet Magazine Reichl writes a moving account of how her life in food began.

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