Spring officially starts on March 20. Celebrate the budding season with these reads for kids. 

Goodbye winter, hello spring by illustrator Kenard Pak

A boy and his dog explore the countryside, greeting the elements of nature that they meet and noting how the environment is changing from winter to spring.

While out exploring Mick, Mack, and Molly take a ride on a fallen log and learn how the snow melts and ends up in the rivers and lakes and eventually in the sky.

Contrary to the rosy picture of race embodied in Barack Obama's political success and Oprah Winfrey's financial success, legal scholar Alexander argues vigorously and persuasively that "[w]e have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it." Jim Crow and legal racial segregation has been replaced by mass incarceration as "a system of social control" ("More African Americans are under correctional control today... than were enslaved in 1850"). Alexander reviews American racial history from the colonies to the Clinton administration, delineating its transformation into the "war on drugs." She offers an acute analysis of the effect of this mass incarceration upon former inmates "who will be discriminated against, legally, for the rest of their lives, denied employment, housing, education, and public benefits." Most provocatively, she reveals how both the move toward colorblindness and affirmative action may blur our vision of injustice: "most Americans know and don't know the truth about mass incarceration"-but her carefully researched, deeply engaging, and thoroughly readable book should change that. 

March. Book 1 [kit] by 1940 February 21- John Lewis

Congressman John Lewis (GA-5) was an American icon, one of the key figures of the civil rights movement. His commitment to justice and nonviolence took him from an Alabama sharecropper's farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington, and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom from the first African-American president. Lewis shares his remarkable story with new generations in March, a graphic novel trilogy, in collaboration with co-writer Andrew Aydin and New York Times best-selling artist Nate Powell (winner of the Eisner Award and LA Times Book Prize finalist for Swallow Me Whole). March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis' lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis' personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement. Book One spans John Lewis' youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall. Many years ago, John Lewis and other student activists drew inspiration from the 1958 comic book "Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story." Now, his own comics bring those days to life for a new audience, testifying to a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations. 

Looking for picture books that engage the senses? Try these interactive stories that invite the reader to touch, tap, mix-and-match, make guesses, and respond to questions.

An interactive story features colorful flip-sections of safari animal body parts that can be mixed and matched to create up to 121 possible combinations.

From head to toe by Eric Carle

Giraffes can bend their necks, monkeys can wave their hands, and donkeys can kick their legs. And so can you! Throughout this interactive book, the animals of From Head to Toe invite young readers to copy their antics as they play.

Photo by Jon Tyson on Unsplash

Reminder to spring ahead this weekend into Daylight Saving Time which begins Sunday, March 13th at 2:00 AM. Move your clocks ahead one hour to gain extra light during the evening hours! In addition, take time to change smoke detector batteries and check carbon monoxide detectors to protect your family and home.

Nonfiction Book Group: May

Join us Saturday, May 15, 2021 at 10:00 AM via Zoom video conference as the Nonfiction Book Group discusses: 

Also available in: e-book | e-audiobook

Why do our headaches persist after we take a one-cent aspirin but disappear when we take a fifty-cent aspirin? Why do we splurge on a lavish meal but cut coupons to save twenty-five cents on a can of soup? When it comes to making decisions in our lives, we think we're making smart, rational choices. But are we? In this newly revised and expanded edition of the groundbreaking New York Times bestseller, Dan Ariely refutes the common assumption that we behave in fundamentally rational ways. From drinking coffee to losing weight, from buying a car to choosing a romantic partner, we consistently overpay, underestimate, and procrastinate. Yet these misguided behaviors are neither random nor senseless. They're systematic and predictable-making us predictably irrational.

This book is immediately available on Hoopla in e-book format. If you would like to reserve a print copy, you may stop in to pick one up. Curbside pick up of materials is also available.

Registered participants will receive an email two days before the program with a link to attend the discussion. To help you make the most of your virtual program experience we have compiled some tips and resources.

Upcoming sessions

Saturday, May 15 - 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM Online

Spring into a new book and join thousands of readers around the world by participating in the Big Library Read! This "global eBook club" will read the Art of Taking it Easy by Dr. Bryan King. Trained as a neuroscientist and psycholgist, Dr. King is also a comedian! This book is a guide to embrace humor in order to reduce stress. It's practical, yet funny and will show you how to live a happier and fuller life. From April 5th - 19th you can borrow and read or listen to the Art of Taking it Easy by Dr. Brian King with unlimited access and no waitlist through OverDrive.

Birdwatching vs. Birding with Backyard Birds and Beyond

Greg Bodker’s beautiful photography will help you learn more about birds as he demonstrate the joys of birding you can have both in your backyard and in our area.  Novice and aspiring birders will especially benefit from the program.   Topics include:

Discuss the excitement and enjoyment of birdwatching
Differences between birdwatching and birding

  • How to attract more birds to your backyard
  • Backyard birds, types of seed, feeders and their care

How birding beyond the backyard leads to many enriching experiences

  • Places to go birding in our area
  • The excitement of a bird chase
  • Stories from the field while birding

Registration Required

This program will take place via Zoom. Zoom links will be sent out 24 hours prior to the start of the program. 

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

As the COVID-19 crisis continues and we wait for the vaccine distribution to expand, Booklist a magazine by the American Library Association, has published a list of books focusing on the science behind vaccinations and how misinformation can spread as fast as a deadly virus. These books help separate fact from fiction. 

A smart and compelling examination of the science of immunity, the public policy implications of vaccine denial, and the real-world outcomes of failing to vaccinate. If you have a child in school, you may have heard stories of long-dormant diseases suddenly reappearing--cases of measles, mumps, rubella, and whooping cough cropping up everywhere from elementary schools to Ivy League universities because a select group of parents refuse to vaccinate their children. Between Hope and Fear tells the remarkable story of vaccine-preventable infectious diseases and their social and political implications. While detailing the history of vaccine invention, Kinch reveals the ominous reality that our victories against vaccine-preventable diseases are not permanent--and could easily be undone. In the tradition of John Barry's The Great Influenza and Siddhartha Mukherjee's The Emperor of All Maladies, Between Hope and Fear relates the remarkable intersection of science, technology and disease that has helped eradicate many of the deadliest plagues known to man.

Unlike natural disasters, whose destruction is concentrated in a limited area over a period of days, and illnesses, which have devastating effects but are limited to individuals and their families, infectious disease has the terrifying power to disrupt everyday life on a global scale, overwhelming public and private resources and bringing trade and transportation to a grinding halt. In today's world, it's easier than ever to move people, animals, and materials around the planet, but the same advances that make modern infrastructure so efficient have made epidemics and even pandemics nearly inevitable. And as outbreaks of COVID-19, Ebola, MERS, and Zika have demonstrated, we are woefully underprepared to deal with the fallout. So what can -- and must -- we do in order to protect ourselves from mankind's deadliest enemy? Drawing on the latest medical science, case studies, policy research, and hard-earned epidemiological lessons, Deadliest Enemy explores the resources and programs we need to develop if we are to keep ourselves safe from infectious disease. The authors show how we could wake up to a reality in which many antibiotics no longer cure, bioterror is a certainty, and the threat of a disastrous influenza or coronavirus pandemic looms ever larger. Only by understanding the challenges we face can we prevent the unthinkable from becoming the inevitable. 

Canton Seniors Book Discussion Group: May

Join us for a live virtual program on Thursday, May 27, 2021 at 2:00PM via Zoom video conference as the Canton Seniors Book Discussion Group discusses: 

Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook

At a gala party thrown by her parents, Evelyn Hardcastle will be killed. Again. She's been murdered hundreds of times, and each day, Aiden Bishop is too late to save her. Doomed to repeat the same day over and over, Aiden's only escape is to solve Evelyn Hardcastle's murder and conquer the shadows of an enemy he struggles to even comprehend. But nothing and no one are quite what they seem.

Upcoming sessions

Thursday, May 27 - 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM Online

Pages