In our unique genomes, every one of us carries the story of our species -- births, deaths, disease, war, famine, migration, and a lot of sex. But those stories have always been locked away -- until now. Who are our ancestors? Where did they come from? Geneticists have suddenly become historians, and the hard evidence in our DNA has blown the lid off what we thought we knew. Acclaimed science writer Adam Rutherford explains exactly how genomics is completely rewriting the human story -- from 100,000 years ago to the present. A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived will upend your thinking on Neanderthals, evolution, royalty, race, and even redheads. (For example, we now know that at least four human species once roamed the earth.) Plus, here is the remarkable, controversial story of how our genes made their way to the America's -- one that's still being written, as ever more of us have our DNA sequenced. 

As war breaks out, Aurelie becomes trapped on the wrong side of the front with her father, Comte Sigismund de Courcelles. When the Germans move into their family's ancestral estate, using it as their headquarters, Aurelie discovers she knows the German Major's aide de camp, Maximilian Von Sternburg. She and the dashing young officer first met during Aurelie's debutante days in Paris. Despite their conflicting loyalties, Aurelie and Max's friendship soon deepens into love, but betrayal will shatter them both, driving Aurelie back to Paris and the Ritz-- the home of her estranged American heiress mother, with unexpected consequences. France, 1942. Raised by her indomitable, free-spirited American grandmother in the glamorous Hotel Ritz, Marguerite "Daisy" Villon remains in Paris with her daughter and husband, a Nazi collaborator, after France falls to Hitler. At first reluctant to put herself and her family at risk to assist her grandmother's Resistance efforts, Daisy agrees to act as a courier for a skilled English forger known only as Legrand, who creates identity papers for Resistance members and Jewish refugees. But as Daisy is drawn ever deeper into Legrand's underground network, committing increasingly audacious acts of resistance for the sake of the country--and the man--she holds dear, she uncovers a devastating secret . . . one that will force her to commit the ultimate betrayal, and to confront at last the shocking circumstances of her own family history. 

A fascinating, illuminating, and witty look at what the vast amounts of information now instantly available to us reveals about ourselves and our world -- provided we ask the right questions. By the end of an average day in the early twenty-first century, human beings searching the internet will amass eight trillion gigabytes of data. This staggering amount of information -- unprecedented in history -- can tell us a great deal about who we are -- the fears, desires, and behaviors that drive us, and the conscious and unconscious decisions we make. From the profound to the mundane, we can gain astonishing knowledge about the human psyche that less than twenty years ago, seemed unfathomable. Everybody Lies offers fascinating, surprising, and sometimes laugh-out-loud insights into everything from economics to ethics to sports to race to sex, gender and more, all drawn from the world of big data. 

Larry McMurtry, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Lonesome Dove, has died.  A prolific writer, McMurtry penned 29 novels and wrote dozens of screenplays.  Many of McMurtry's books have been turned into award-winning films and television series, including Hud, The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, and Lonesome Dove.  McMurtry won an Academy Award for adapting E. Annie Proulx's short story Brokeback Mountain into a screenplay (with writing partner Diana Ossana).  Larry McMurtry lives on through his contributions to Western literature, film, and popular culture. 

Selected Works

Lonesome Dove : a novel by Larry McMurtry
Also available in: video | e-video

Reading the stories and histories of well-known individuals can help highlight the human experience: we all experience happiness, sort through grief, and desire to connect to others. 

The titles below cover famous figures from all walks of life. Their stories may overlap with parts of your story.

When he was two years old, Hunter Biden was badly injured in a car accident that killed his mother and baby sister. In 2015, he suffered the devastating loss of his beloved big brother, Beau, who died of brain cancer at the age of forty-six. These hardships were compounded by the collapse of his marriage and a years-long battle with drug and alcohol addiction.

In Beautiful Things, Hunter recounts his descent into substance abuse and his tortuous path to sobriety. The story ends with where Hunter is today--a sober married man with a new baby, finally able to appreciate the beautiful things in life. 

Madam C. J. Walker--reputed to be America's first self-made woman millionaire--has long been celebrated for her rags-to-riches story. Born to former slaves in the Louisiana Delta in the aftermath of the Civil War, married at fourteen, and widowed at twenty, Walker spent the first decades of her life as a laundress, laboring in conditions that paralleled the lives of countless poor and working-class African American women. By the time of her death in 1919, however, Walker had refashioned herself into one of the most famous African American figures in the nation: the owner and president of a hair-care empire and a philanthropist wealthy enough to own a country estate near the Rockefellers in the prestigious New York town of Irvington-on-Hudson. In this biography, Erica Ball places this remarkable and largely forgotten life story in the context of Walker's times. Ball analyzes Walker's remarkable acts of self-fashioning, and explores the ways that Walker (and the Walker brand) enabled a new generation of African Americans to bridge the gap between a nineteenth-century agrarian past and a twentieth-century future as urban-dwelling consumers. 

When Beverly Cleary started elementary school, she was assigned to the "low reader" group. She didn't enjoy reading, didn't like the books at school and struggled to read them. Then one rainy day, bored at home, Beverly picked up The Dutch Twins by Lucy Fitch Perkins - and everything changed. Beverly was interested in this story, about the everyday adventures and antics of two siblings, and she really did enjoy reading!

From then on, Beverly went to the library to find books that she wanted to read. After college, Mrs. Cleary became a children's librarian and began to write her own books about the everyday adventures and antics of a group of kids on Klickitat Street. You may know them - Ramona and Beatrice "Beezus" Quimby, or Henry Huggins and his dog Ribsy. Mrs. Cleary wrote dozens of books that engaged children, including The Mouse and the Motorcycle and the Newberry Award-winning Dear Mr. Henshaw

Beverly Cleary had a gift for capturing the essence of childhood, what it feels like to be a kid, and respectfully representing the inner lives of children. Mrs. Cleary's work has been translated into twenty-eight languages and touched the lives of children around the world. Twenty years ago, the Library of Congress named Beverly Cleary a Living Legend and, though Mrs. Cleary has passed, that legend lives on through her books and their readers. 

"Quite often somebody will say, ‘what year do your books take place?’ and the only answer I can give is, ‘in childhood.’" - Beverly Cleary

A Selection Beverly Cleary's Books

Genealogy Connect: Stuck? Research Strategies for Those Brick Wall Ancestors

Join us on Thursday, May 20 at 10:00 AM as Michigan genealogist Kris Rzepczynski presents "Stuck? Research Strategies for Those Brick Wall Ancestors".  This will be a virtual meeting via Zoom.  Registration required and will begin April 22, 2021. 

Want to know more about Zoom programs?  Check out these tips for a great experience.  

Upcoming sessions

Thursday, May 20 - 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM Online

I know the secret identity of Lady Whistledown! Do you? Are you a Bridgerton fan wanting something to do until season 2 of the wildly popular show (based on the books by Julia Quinn) begins on Netflix? Hopefully, some of these fun reads can help get you through until the return of Bridgerton! Enjoy!

A lady's formula for love by Elizabeth Everett

What is a lady's formula for love? Bring together one brilliant noblewoman and an enigmatic bodyguard. Mix in a measure of danger and attraction. Heat over the warmth of humor and friendship, and the result is more than simple chemistry--it's elemental. Lady Violet Hughes is keeping secrets. First, she founded London's first social club for ladies to provide sanctuary for England's most brilliant female scientists. Second, she is using her genius on a clandestine mission for the Crown. But the biggest secret of all? Her feelings for protection officer Arthur Kneland. The most guarded of men, Kneland learned the hard way to put duty first. But the more time spent in the company of Violet and the eccentric club members, the more his best intentions go up in flames. Literally. When a shadowy threat infiltrates Violet's laboratories, endangering her life and her work, scientist and bodyguard will find all their theories put to the test--and learn that the most important discoveries are those of the hear.

March 25th is the birthday of two giants of Women's History--Aretha Franklin and Gloria Steinem. These two women paved the way for women's rights, civil rights, in the music industry, and beyond during the course of their lives. Let's eat a cupcake, sing, "Happy Birthday!," and enjoy learning about these two amazing women plus more history making ladies.

R-E-S-P-E-C-T : Aretha Franklin, the queen of soul by 1956- Carole Boston Weatherford

Celebrate April Fools with one of the greatest pranksters of them all: Jim Halpert from The Office. Did you know that the library has all nine seasons of The Office available for checkout? Grab one of Angela's double-fudge brownies or some of Kevin's famous chili and start your binge-watching marathon today!

The first Animal Crossing game came out in Japan on April 14th, 2001. The game was titled "Animal Forest" and was release for the Nintendo 64. The US version was renamed "Animal Crossing" and was released for the Nintendo GameCube. Since then, 4 more main games have been released along with a few spin off series. Animal Crossing New Horizons became very popular in 2020 due to it's release around the same time many people were quarantining at home. This real time simulation game allowed people to leave the house virtually and play with friends. What is your favorite Animal Crossing memory?

PIN day at CPL is April 29!

On April 29, all CPL patrons will have PINs added to their patron accounts.

A PIN will be needed for any self-service transaction, for example, on our website or using self-check, but not for any person-to-person transaction at the Check Out Desk.

What is a PIN?

A Personal Identification Number (PIN) is a secondary form of authentication used to access your account that provides an extra layer of security.

How does a PIN help with security?

Using a PIN in conjunction with your library card number adds an extra layer of security to your account. If you lose your card or someone obtains your library card number, a PIN helps prevent unauthorized use of your library account.

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