History

The movie "Hidden Figures," in theaters this month, is a true story featuring a team of African-American women scientists. Here are some materials you can check out featuring African-American women pioneers. 

Read the Book Before the Movie

More African-American Women Pioneers

It's January, it's cold, and most likely the streets are icy.  A good time to sit back and watch a movie from the wonderful collection at Canton Public Library.

A group of nostalgic World War II veterans revisit the shores of Normandy, recounting the events that impacted their lives.

In the mid-1930's the great politician and orator Winston Churchill was out of favor with the English people and struggling to make his voice heard. Wrestling with his personal demons, a lonely but defiant Churchill attempts to warn the world of the impending gloom surrounding Hitler's Germany.

n 1921, Jimmy Gralton's sin was to build a dance hall on a rural crossroads in an Ireland on the brink of Civil War. The Pearse-Connolly Hall was a place where young people could come to learn, to argue, to dream; but above all to dance and have fun. As the hall grew in popularity its socialist and free-spirited reputation brought it to the attention of the church and politicians who forced Jimmy to flee and the hall to close. A decade later, as Jimmy reintegrates into the community and sees the poverty and growing cultural oppression, the leader and activist within him is stirred. He makes the decision to reopen the hall in the face of whatever trouble it may bring.

January 1, 1660. Samuel Pepys began writing his famous diary in which he chronicled life in London  - including the Great Plague during 1664 and 1665, and the Great Fire of 1666.

January 1, 1863. The Emancipation Proclamation was issued by President Abraham Lincoln, freeing the slaves in the states rebelling against the Union.

January 1, 1892. Ellis Island was opened in New York Harbor. Over 20 million immigrants were processed there until it closed in 1954.

January 1, 1993. Czechoslovakia was broken into separate Czech and Slovak republics

The Canton Seniors Book Group meets on the fourth Thursday of the month (except in November) from 2:00-3:00PM in the Friends' Activity Room.  We read a variety of fiction and non-fiction selections. Copies of the month's selection are distributed at the book discussion or request a copy at Canton Public Library's Information Desk.  Join us in this open, no-registration-required conversation.

January 27, 2017

The prophet by Michael Koryta

Two brothers in a small Midwestern town--one the high school's beloved football coach on the verge of a state championship and the other one scraping by as a bail bondsman--have been at odds since their sister was abducted and murdered when they were teenagers. Now a new killing with ties to each of them forces a painful and adversarial reunion.

February 23, 2017

Sixteenth-century Europe saw an explosion of female rule. Large swathes of the continent were under the firm hand of a dozen reigning women as queens, regents, mothers, wives, or counselors. From Isabella of Castile, her daughter Katherine of Aragon, and her granddaughter Mary Tudor, to Catherine de Medici, Anne Boleyn, and Elizabeth Tudor; from England and France to the Netherlands, and across the Holy Roman Empire, these women wielded enormous power over their territories, shaping the course of European history for over a century.

The remarkable untold story of how the American Revolution's success depended on substantial military and financial assistance provided by France and Spain, and places the Revolution in the context of the global strategic interests of those nations in their fight against Great Britain.

Today marks the 75th anniversary of the surprise attack on Hawaii's Pearl Harbor by the Imperial Japanese Navy. The early morning attack on December 7, 1941 on the U.S. fleet stationed in the harbor, and at Hickam Field where 51 airplanes were on the ground, was the catalyst for the United States' entry into World War II. Nine ships were sunk and twenty-one were severely damaged and nearly half of the airplanes were destroyed or severely damaged. The death toll numbered 2,403 - 1,177 from the battleship Arizona alone.

Day of infamy by Walter Lord

On December 1, 1955 Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a white man on a  Montgomery, Alabama bus. Her act of nonviolent resistance sparked a boycott of public buses in that city that lasted for 381 days. On June 4, 1956, a federal ruling,  Browder v. Gayle, declared that Alabama's racial segregation laws for buses were unconstitutional. After the state appealed the decision, the case went to the U.S. Supreme Court where on November 13, 1956 the ruling was upheld, leading to a city ordinance authorizing black bus passengers to sit anywhere they chose. The boycott officially ended December 20, 1956. Find out more more about this important milestone in Civil Rights, as well as the history of dissent in United States history with some of the following titles from the Library's collection.

December 1, 1919.  Lady Nancy Astor became the first woman in the British House of Commons.

December 1, 1955.  Rosa Parks was arrested in Montgomery, Alabama, for refusing to give up her seat to a white man and move to the back section of a municipal bus. This action resulted in a year-long boycott of the city's  bus system by African Americans.

December 1, 1988.  Benazir Bhutto was nominated to become prime minister of Pakistan, later becoming the first woman to govern a Muslim nation

December 2, 1954.   Senator Joseph McCarthy is condemned by the United States Senate for misconduct following his ruthless investigations of thousands of alleged Communists.

Check out what's available at Canton Public Library.  This Wednesday, December 7 at 7:00PM in the Community Room, Yankee Air Museum's Randy Hotton shares his extensive research on the Willow Run Bomber Plant and How Detroit Saved the World. Need help with your e-reader?  Drop-in assistance is available at the Information desk every Friday from 10:00 -11:00AM.  Looking for a book group? We offer four book groups which meet monthly at the library: Lunch and a Book, Canton Seniors Book Group (for 55+), the Non-Fiction Book Group, and the Adult Contemporary Book Group.

November 8, 1923.  Hitler's "Beer Hall Putsch" took place in Munich took place, wherein Hitler, Goering and armed Nazis attempted, but ultimately failed, to forcibly seize power and overthrow democracy in Germany.

November 9 -10, 1938.  Kristallnacht ("the night of broken glass") took place in Germany as Nazi mobs burned synagogues and vandalized Jewish shops and homes.

November 9, 1989.  The Berlin Wall was opened after standing for 28 years during which it completely cut off West Berlin from Eastern Germany. The almost 28 mile long wall had been built  in 1961.

November 14, 1889.  Newspaper reporter Nellie Bly set out from New York to beat the record of Jules Verne's fictional hero Phileas Fogg, who famously traveled around the world in 80 days. And, another young woman reporter, Elizabeth Bisland, set off at the same time to see who could accomplish the feat first.

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