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150th Anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's Assassination

Abraham Lincoln was shot on Good Friday, April 14, 1865 while watching a play at Ford's Theatre in the closing days of the Civil War. The assassination was carried out by a popular actor of the time, John Wilkes Booth, as part of a conspiracy to revive the Confederacy.

The day Lincoln was shot by Jim Bishop


The darkest dawn: Lincoln, Booth, and the great American tragedy by Thomas Goodrich


Manhunt: the twelve-day chase for Lincoln's killer by James L. Swanson


American Brutus: John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln conspiracies by Michael W. Kauffman


Lincoln's assassins: their trial and execution: an illustrated history by James L. Swanson and Daniel R. Weinberg

150th Anniversary of U.S. Civil War's End

The Battle of Appomattox Courthouse was fought on the morning of April 9, 1865, and was the final engagement of the Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia  with Ulysses S. Grant's forces. The surrender documents were signed that afternoon.

A stillness at Appomattox by Bruce Catton


The Civil War, a narrative: Red River to Appomatox by Shelby Foote


Witness to Appomattox by Richard Wheeler


The fall of the house of Dixie: the Civil War and the social revolution that transformed the South by Bruce Levine

Nonfiction Picture Books for Women's History Month

March is Women's History Month. To celebrate, try one of these great picture books featuring the true stories of strong, smart women throughout history. 

America's champion swimmer: Gertrude Ederle by written by David A. Adler ; illustrated by Terry Widener
Describes the life and accomplishments of Gertrude Ederle, the first woman to swim the English Channel and a figure in the early women's rights movement

Eleanor quiet no more: the life of Eleanor Roosevelt by written by Doreen Rappaport ; illustrated by Gary Kelley
Explores the life of Eleanor Roosevelt from her upbringing, education, and marriage to Franklin Delano.



Elizabeth leads the way: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the right to vote by Tanya Lee Stone ; illustrations by Rebecca Gibbon
Describes the life of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, a pioneer of women's rights.

Holocaust Remembrance Day: Docu Watch – "Never a Bystander"

Join us in watching this short documentary film titled Never A Bystander, featuring an inspiring Holocaust survivor, Irene Butter, who shows viewers how empowered choices — forgiveness included — enables lives of joy, purpose, and compassion. This film was filmed partially at Discovery Middle school in Canton.  Both the films subject, Irene Butter and the film’s director, Evelyn Neuhaus, will be in attendance for an engaging Q&A. All ages welcome on Wednesday, April 15 from 7:00-8:00 PM.

Look What's In Large Print: History

“To me, history ought to be a source of pleasure. It isn't just part of our civic responsibility. To me, it's an enlargement of the experience of being alive, just the way literature or art or music is." ― David McCullough[The Title Always Comes Last; NEH 2003 Jefferson Lecturer interview profile]

Children's Biographies for Women's History Month

In honor of Women's History Month, read the fascinating true stories of some of the many women who have shaped our world.

I am Malala: how one girl stood up for education and changed the world by Malala Yousafzai with Patricia McCormick
Raised in a once-peaceful area of Pakistan transformed by terrorism, Malala was taught to stand up for what she believes. So she fought for her right to be educated. And on October 9, 2012, she nearly lost her life for the cause. --Provided by publisher.

Bon appétit!: the delicious life of Julia Child by Jessie Hartland
Follow Julia Child-chef, author, and television personality-from her childhood in Pasadena, California, to her life as a spy in WWII, to the cooking classes she took in Paris, to publication of Mastering the Art of French Cooking, to the funny moments of being a chef on TV. -- Provided by publisher.

Celebrate St. Patrick's Day

Erin go Bragh! The celebration of St. Patrick's Day outside of Ireland is a clear indication of the Irish influence throughout the world. In the United States many cities and towns recognize March 17th with parades and parties to mark the holiday of Ireland's patron saint. Ireland has made a significant contribution to literature and the arts both in the United States and throughout the world. Celebrate the day by sampling a wee bit of Irish culture and history from some of the many titles available in the Library's collection:

Books

Atlas of the Celtic world by John Haywood ; foreword by Barry Cunliffe — A historical, cultural and linguistic survey of the Celtic peoples from prehistoric times to the modern era, presented in a series of 54 full-color maps with accompanying text and 160 illustrations.

Black potatoes: the story of the great Irish famine, 1845-1850 by Susan Campbell Bartoletti — The story of the Great Irish Famine of the late 1840s through the voices of the Irish people.

Children's Nonfiction for Women's History Month

Celebrate by reading one of these stories about how women have changed history.

Girls think of everything: stories of ingenious inventions by women by Catherine Thimmesh ; illustrated by Melissa Sweet
Tells the story of how women throughout the ages have responded to situations confronting them in daily life by inventing such items as correction fluid, space helmets, and disposable diapers.

Almost astronauts: 13 women who dared to dream by Tanya Lee Stone ; [foreword by Margaret A. Weitekamp]
Even though the Mercury 13 women did not make it into space, they did not lose, for their example empowered young women to take their place in the sky, piloting jets and commanding space capsules. -- Provided by publisher.

Selma to Montgomery, March 7-25, 1965

Three marches in 1965, from  Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, were part of the Selma Voting Rights Movement and led to the passage that year of the Voting Rights Act, considered a landmark federal achievement of the Civil Rights Movement.

Across that bridge: life lessons and a vision for change by John Lewis ; with Brenda Jones


Controversy and hope: the civil rights photographs of James Karales by Julian Cox with Rebekah Jacob and Monica Karales ; foreword by Andrew Young


Eyes on the prize: America's civil rights years, 1954- 1965 by Juan Williams, with the Eyes on the prize production team ; introduction by Julian Bond


Pillar of fire: America in the King years, 1963-65 by Taylor Branch