Kids Book Lists

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J000-099 Collection

aliensAre you interested in books and DVD's about the extraordinary or unexplained? Ever need an encyclopedia or almanac to check-out and take home? Thinking about finding bigfoot or tracking UFO's? Curious about computers and the internet? Be sure to stop by the J000-099 collection in the Children's Non-fiction section. We have all sorts of cool items on monsters, aliens, the internet, the Guinness Book of World Records, World Book Encyclopedia, almanacs, the People and Places encyclopedia, and so much more. Enjoy!

Memory Bank

The Memory Bank by Carolyn Coman and Rob Shepperson is an enjoyable, but puzzling story. Soft black&white pictures tell some of the story, as with Selznick's The Invention of Hugo Cabret. It has the dark, mysterious aura of Gaiman's Coraline. Parental figures are rather horrific, as one might find in Roald Dahl's creations. Hope Scroggins becomes entangled in the WWMB (World Wide Memory Bank) and a dream realm in a desperate search for her younger sister whom her parents told her to forget about after dumping Honey out of the car for misbehavior. But the whole book has a very surrealistic quality to it and I am wondering what is real, what is dreamed, what is the intent of the authors. As Keats might say, "Gone is the vision. Do I wake, or do I sleep?" So I am asking all readers to please post your thoughts/feelings/reactions to this awesome, but mysterious story.

Summer Reads

It's hot outside! Kids, enjoy some books about how others beat the heat. If you want to cool off, chill out and read a book at the library — we have air conditioning! Here are some hot summery picture books and easy reader books. Keep cool, and don't forget your sunscreen!

Amanda Pig and the really hot day by Jean Van Leeuwen; pictures by Ann Schweninger

Hot dog by Molly Coxe

Clifford keeps cool by Norman Bridwell

One hot summer day by Nina Crews

Think cool thoughts by Elizabeth Perry; illustrated by Linda Bronson

Poet Laureate for Children

The Poetry Foundation has chosen their newest Poet Laureate, J. Patrick Lewis! The Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) has written a lovely post about Mr. Lewis on their blog. Also, we have a wonderful selection of poetry books by Mr. Lewis in our collection that you should check out and enjoy!

Outdoor Games

Don't want to be cooped up in the house this summer? Play some cool outdoor games and keep boredom at bay. Need ideas to get you started? Check out the list of books below. You'll find new ideas for games along with some old familiar favorites.

Run, jump, hide, slide, splash: the 200 best outdoor games ever by Joe Rhatigan & Rain Newcomb

Get out!: outdoor activities kids can enjoy anywhere (except indoors) by Hallie Warshaw with Jake Miller; photography by Julie Brown

Let's go outside!: outdoor activities and projects to get you and your kids closer to nature by Jennifer Ward; illustrations by Susie Ghahremani

Sidewalk games by Glen Vecchione; illustrated by Blanche Sims

Music for Kids

Hey Kids! Are you looking for some new songs to enjoy in the car? Or some great CDs along with which to sing? Then check out some of the new music we have at the library. There's a new CD by the Wiggles and some great Broadway music too!

Wiggles, the: ukulele baby by Wiggles

Big bully: the best foot forward series

Kidz bop presents 101 crazy jokes for kids

Kidz bop sings monster ballads

Mamma mia! 4 kids: kids favorites from the hit Broadway show! by Benny Andersson, Bjorn Ulvaeus & Stig Anderson

Wicked 4 kids: favorites from the hit Broadway musical by Schwartz, Stephen

Bike Month

The month of May just happens to be National Bike Month. Now that the weather's finally improving, take some time to get outside and ride your bike. Check out some bike books, too! Listed below are a few fun choices. Happy reading (and bike riding!).

Little Lizard's new bike by Melinda Melton Crow; illustrated by Andrew Rowland

Curious George rides a bike by H. A. Rey

A crash course for Molly by Eva Eriksson; translated by Elisabeth Kallick Dyssegaard

The red racer by Audrey Wood

Fantasy Floats

The Floating Islands by Rachel Neumeier — is another must-read for all tween/teen fantasy fans. Fourteen-year-old Trei lost his family to a volcanic explosion and seeks refuge with his aunt, uncle, and cousin in the neighboring, airborn kingdom of the Floating Islands. Upon arriving he sees men soaring in the skies with wings and dragon magic and is consumed with the desire to also be a kajurai. Soon after his arrival his aunt and uncle become victims of a horrid epidemic. Now is cousin Araene is also an orphan and must decide what she will do with her life. The constraints on woman in her kingdom are unbearable, but she is clever and soon finds a way to pursue her love of the culinary arts, as well as to use her gifts in the art of magic - as long as no one discovers her sexual disguise that is. As they pursue their dreams, neither realizes that the fate of the Floating Islands is in their hands.

Funny and Fighting

Enjoy humor? Enjoy Action? If you've read 39 clues, Percy Jackson, and Diary of a Wimpy Kid, and you're looking for more books that will either make you gasp, or make you laugh, check these out:

Fablehaven by Brandon Mull; illustrated by Brandon Dorman

The day my butt went psycho by Andy Griffiths

Beyond the Deepwoods by Paul Stewart & Chris Riddell

Midnight for Charlie Bone by Jenny Nimmo

Emerald Atlas — a Gem of a Fantasy

Ready for another fantastic fantasy series? The Books of Beginning is here, beginning with The Emerald Atlas by John Stephens. Meet Kate, Michael, and Emma — siblings who have been ousted from many orphanages ever since the disappearance of their parents 10 years ago. They finally wind up in a very strange home in Cambridge Falls run by a Dr. Pym that has no other children at all. While exploring this run-down mansion, they happen upon a mysterious emerald atlas that has the power to transport them in time. From this point on their lives are filled with fast-paced magical adventures in that age-old struggle between good and evil. Along they way they are separated, encounter humorous dwarves, fall prey to an evil countess-witch's wiles, are guided by wise wizards, are attacked by horrific creatures, and realize to save hundreds of innocent people, they have to be ready to sacrifice themselves. By the end of Book One you feel as if you really know and care about these characters and the next challenges they will face in discovering the other two books. These three powerful books when combined hold those magical secrets which brought the universe to life, but in the wrong hands can destroy it.

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