Suggested Titles for Sixth Grade

The following fiction and non-fiction titles may be enjoyed by children in sixth grade. Please remember, readers have different interests and read at different levels so not all of these titles will appeal to, or be appropriate for, every sixth grader. 

For more specific recommendations, we encourage you to chat with the librarian at the Children's Desk about your child's reading interests or use our May We Suggest form. 

Fiction Titles

Awkward by artist 1979- Svetlana Chmakova

After shunning Jaime, the school nerd, on her first day at a new middle school, Penelope Torres tries to blend in with her new friends in the art club, until the art club goes to war with the science club, of which Jaime is a member.

Dress coded by Carrie Firestone

Molly Frost is FED UP... Because Liza got dress coded and Molly didn't, even though they were wearing the exact same outfit. Because when Jessica was pulled over by the principal and missed a math quiz, her teacher gave her an F. Because girls' bodies are not a distraction. Because middle school is hard enough. Molly starts a podcast where girls can tell their stories, and soon her small rebellion swells into a revolution.

Dragon Pearl by 1979- Yoon Ha Lee

Min, a thirteen-year-old girl with fox-magic, stows away on a battle cruiser and impersonates a cadet in order to solve the mystery of what happened to her older brother in the Thousand World Space Forces.

The fourteenth goldfish by Jennifer L Holm

Ellie's scientist grandfather has discovered a way to reverse aging, and consequently has turned into a teenager-- which makes for complicated relationships when he moves in with Ellie and her mother, his daughter.

This story was going to begin like all the best stories. With a school bus falling from the sky. But no one saw it happen. They were all too busy—Talking about boogers. Stealing pocket change. Skateboarding. Wiping out. Braving up. Executing complicated handshakes. Planning an escape. Making jokes. Lotioning up. Finding comfort. But mostly, too busy walking home.

The moon within by Aida Salazar

Eleven-year-old (nearly twelve) Celi Rivera, who is a mix of Black-Puerto Rican-Mexican Indian is uncomfortable about her approaching period, and the changes that are happening to her body; she is horrified that her mother wants to hold a traditional public moon ceremony to celebrate the occasion--until she finds out that her best friend Magda is contemplating an even more profound change of life.

Nevermoor : the trials of Morrigan Crow by 1985- Jessica Townsend

A cursed child destined to die on her eleventh birthday is rescued and whisked away to a secret realm called Nevermoor and given the chance to compete for a place in a prestigious organization called the Wundrous Society.

One crazy summer by Rita Williams-Garcia

The story of three sisters who travel to Oakland, California, in 1968 to meet the mother who abandoned them. Their mother, a dedicated poet and printer, is resentful of their visit and wants them to attend a nearby Black Panther summer camp.

When his father disappears and his mother is abducted, Ryan learns that his missing parents are secret agents and that he must undertake a perilous mission to rescue them.

Stand up, Yumi Chung! by 1980- Jessica Kim

On the outside, Yumi Chung suffers from #shygirlproblems, a perm-gone-wrong, and kids calling her "Yu-MEAT" because she smells like her family's Korean barbecue restaurant. On the inside, Yumi is ready for her Netflix stand-up special. Her notebook is filled with mortifying memories that she's reworked into comedy gold. All she needs is a stage and courage.

What lane? by Torrey Maldonado

Anything his friends can do, Stephen should be able to do too, right? So when they dare each other to sneak into an abandoned building, he doesn't think it's his lane, but he goes. Here's the thing, though: Can he do everything his friends can? Lately, he's not so sure. As a mixed kid, he feels like he's living in two worlds with different rules--and he's been noticing that strangers treat him differently than his white friends.

When you reach me by Rebecca Stead

Shortly after a fall-out with her best friend, sixth grader Miranda starts receiving mysterious notes, and she doesn't know what to do. It would be easy to ignore the strange messages, except that whoever is leaving them has an uncanny ability to predict the future. If that is the case, then Miranda has a big problem--because the notes tell her that someone is going to die, and she might be too late to stop it.

Nonfiction Titles

Read about Amelia's life (from childhood up until her last flight) and the exhaustive search for her and her missing plane. With incredible photos, maps, and handwritten notes from Amelia herself - plus informative sidebars tackling everything from the history of flight to what Amelia liked to eat while flying (tomato soup).

The definitive nonfiction title about human and animal bones, delivered with in-your-face accuracy and intrigue. Come face-to-face with some head-to-toe boney comparisons, many of them shown at actual size. Here you'll find the differences between a man's hand and that of a spider monkey; the great weight of an elephant's leg, paired with the feather-light femur of a stork; and rib-tickling info about snakes and sloths. How many bones are in the whole human body?

Sadako Sasaki was two years old when the atomic bomb was dropped on her city of Hiroshima at the end of World War II. Ten years later, just as life was starting to feel almost normal again, this athletic and enthusiastic girl was fighting a war of a different kind. One of many children affected by the bomb, she had contracted leukemia. Patient and determined, Sadako set herself the task of folding 1000 paper cranes in the hope that her wish to be made well again would be granted. 

Fannie Sellins lived during the Gilded Age, when the Carnegies and Morgans wore jewels while their laborers wore rags. Fannie dreamed that America could achieve its ideals of equality and justice for all. She traveled the nation and eventually gave her life, calling for fair wages and decent working and living conditions for workers in both the garment and mining industries. 

Major Impossible by artist 1976- Nathan Hale

John Wesley Powell (1834-1902) always had the spirit of adventure in him. As a young man, he traveled all over the United States exploring. When the Civil War began, Powell went to fight for the Union, and even after he lost most of his right arm, he continued to fight until the war was over. He then embarked on the 1869 Powell Geographic Expedition, which became the first official US government-sponsored passage through the Grand Canyon. Over the course of three months, the explorers lost their boats and supplies, nearly drowned, and were in peril on multiple occasions. 

Could Dr. Frankenstein's machine ever animate a body? Why should vampires drink from veins and not arteries? What body parts are best for zombies to eat? (It's not brains.) This fascinating encyclopedia of monsters delves into the history and science behind eight legendary creatures, from Bigfoot and the kraken to zombies and more. Find out each monster's origin story and the real-world history that informed it, and then explore the science of each creature in fun and surprising ways. 

Mummies exposed! by Kerrie Logan Hollihan

Presents examples of mummies from all over the world, including Khnum-Nakht, King Tut, the Beauty of Xiaohe, and the Lady of Cao, and explores the ways bodies are mummified.

Here is the fascinating true story of how food was made safer to eat thanks to the stubborn dedication of government chemist Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley, whose hard work and determination led to the creation of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

In its own way the Wild West was a melting post every bit as much as the cities of the East Coast. While the American cowboy is a cultural icon and part of our national mythology, many people don't know that a significant percentage of America's cowboys were African American, Latino, and Native American. Many cowboys were even... cowgirls.

Ugly by 1972- Robert Hoge

A funny, moving, and true story of an ordinary boy with an extraordinary face that's perfect for fans of Wonder. When Robert Hoge was born, he had a tumor the size of a tennis ball in the middle of his face and short, twisted legs. Surgeons removed the tumor and made him a new nose from one of his toes.  Amazingly, he survived--with a face that would never be the same.