New Books on the History Shelf

One of George Washington's most able subordinates, Anthony Wayne's military performance during and after the Revolutionary war is a story that needs to be more widely known.

Detroit is known for its automotive heritage, the Motown sound and American's first mile of concrete highway. But this city on the river has more than three hundred years of history, and most of it is easy to experience if you know where to look. There's the Michigan Theatre, the ornate movie house turned parking garage with a grand stage looming over its cars. Picturesque Alfred Brush Ford Park has the remnants of missile radar towers that connected to their Nike counterparts once buried on Belle Isle. Then there are incredible landmarks like Detroit's massive salt mines, a monument to urban graffiti known as the Dequindre Cut as well as Baker's, the world's oldest operating jazz club.

The current climate of partisan fury is not new, and in The Soul of America, Meacham shows us how what Lincoln called the "better angels of our nature" have won the day. Painting surprising portraits of Presidents, including Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Ulysses S. Grant, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight Eisenhower, Lyndon B. Johnson, and others, and illuminating the courage of such influential citizen activists as Martin Luther King, Jr., early suffragettes Alice Paul and Carrie Chapman Catt, civil rights pioneers Rosa Parks and John Lewis, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and Army-McCarthy hearings lawyer Joseph N. Welch, Meacham brings vividly to life turning points in American history.

This trenchant analysis examines the many ways our society's increasingly tenuous commitment to facts laid the groundwork for Donald Trump's rise to power.

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