Canton Public Library Book Purchase Enrichment Fund

In 2017 the Canton Public Library Book Purchase Enrichment Fund was created through a generous anonymous donation from appreciative readers. This donation enhances our print collection through the purchase of literary fiction and literary genre fiction; or quality narrative nonfiction primarily in the areas of science, social science, the humanities, literary biographies, and history. If you're interested in contributing to the Canton Public Library Book Purchase Enrichment Fund, contact the fund's administrator, the Canton Community Foundation. Following are just a few of the books this thoughtful donation has allowed us to purchase in 2017. To find a complete list of books librarians have purchased with this money, keyword search the terms Book Purchase Enrichment Fund in our catalog.

Drawing from the great folklorists of the past while expanding African American lore with dozens of tales rarely seen before, The Annotated African American Folktales revolutionizes the canon like no other volume. Acclaimed scholars Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Maria Tatar assemble a groundbreaking collection of folktales, myths, and legends that revitalizes a vibrant African American past to produce the most comprehensive and ambitious collection of African American folktales ever published in American literary history.

A consideration of Fosse's career in the context of changes in the Broadway musical theater over four decades. The book traces his early dance years and the importance of early mentors George Abbott and Jerome Robbins on his work. It examines how each of the important women in his adult life - all dancers - impacted his career and influenced his dance aesthetic. Finally, the book investigates how his evolution as both artist and individual mirrored the social and political climate of his era and allowed him to comfortably ride a wave of cultural changes. 

In this timely look at America's contested past, Kytle and Roberts trace the ways in which slavery has been portrayed in Charleston, SC-the center of the American slave trade and a leader in the move toward secession-from the Civil War to the present. The authors also carefully detail how slavery has been deliberately misrepresented or simply ignored in published histories, music, museums, and historic tours.

The bitter feud between President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Chief Justice Earl Warren framed the tumultuous future of the modern civil rights movement. Eisenhower was a gradualist who wanted to coax white Americans in the South into eventually accepting integration, while Warren, author of the Supreme Court's historic unanimous opinion in Brown v. Board of Education, demanded immediate action to dismantle the segregation of the public school system. Compellingly written, Eisenhower vs. Warren brings to vivid life the clash that continues to reverberate in political and constitutional debates today.

Fire sermon : a novel by Jamie Quatro

Maggie is entirely devoted to her husband Thomas, their two beautiful children, and to God--until what begins as a platonic intellectual and spiritual exchange between writer Maggie and poet James transforms into an erotically-charged bond that challenges Maggie's sense of loyalty and morality, drawing her deeper into the darkness of desire.

Freshwater by Akwaeke Emezi

Ada has always been unusual. As an infant in southern Nigeria, she is a source of deep concern to her family.The young Ada becomes a troubled child, prone to violent fits of anger and grief. But Ada turns out to be more than just volatile. Born "with one foot on the other side," she begins to develop separate selves. When Ada travels to America for college, a traumatic event crystallizes the selves into something more powerful. As Ada fades into the background of her own mind and these alters--now protective, now hedonistic--move into control, Ada's life spirals in a dangerous direction.

Graffiti palace by A. G. Lombardo

It's August 1965 and Los Angeles is scorching. Americo Monk, a street-haunting aficionado of graffiti, is frantically trying to return home to the makeshift harbor community (assembled from old shipping containers) where he lives with his girlfriend, Karmann. But this is during the Watts Riots, and although his status as a chronicler of all things underground garners him free passage through the territories fiercely controlled by gangs, his trek is nevertheless diverted. Embarking on an exhilarating, dangerous, and at times paranormal journey, Monk crosses paths with a dizzying array of representatives from Los Angeles subcultures, including Chinese gangsters, graffiti bombers, witches, the Nation of Islam leader Elijah Muhammad, and others.

In this fascinating tour of a celebrated city during one of its most trying, significant, and ultimately triumphant eras, Agnes Poirier unspools the stories of the poets, writers, painters, and philosophers whose lives collided to extraordinary effect between 1940 and 1950. At every turn, Poirier deftly hones in on the most compelling and colorful history, without undermining the crucial significance of the era.

Disillusioned with what the American film industry had become by the 1970s, Bette Davis remembered a time when "women owned Hollywood." This book is their story. Historian J.E. Smyth challenges the belief, reinforced in too many histories and public comments, that feminism died between 1930 and 1950, that women were not important within the Hollywood studio system, that male directors called all the shots, and that the most important Hollywood writer you should know about is Dalton Trumbo.

Paris metro : a novel by Wendell Steavenson

Kit, a reporter, has spent several years after 9/11 living in the Middle East, working as a correspondent for an American newspaper. Moving between war-torn Baghdad, riots in Beirut, Syria during the Arab Spring, and Greece in the midst of a refugee crisis, she befriends insurgents, fundamentalists and soldiers, diplomats, middlemen, and monks, determined to understand and tell their story. But after the Charlie Hebdo attack occurs and, a few months later, terrorists storm the Bataclan, Kit's core beliefs are shattered. The violence she had spent years covering abroad is now on her doorstep. What is the point of truth and tolerance when everything is blowing up around you?  

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