White text reads Arab American Heritage Month over blue and gold background

This month we celebrate Arab Americans, our friends and neighbors whose heritage can be traced to the Arab world. Many people assume the Arab world is synonymous with the Middle East, but there are twenty-two countries, spanning West Asia to North Africa, that make up the Arab world. While sharing a common linguistic heritage, the Arab American community's diversity is reflected in the various religious and cultural practices of its members. 

Michigan is home to the second-largest Arab American population in the United States. While the community is concentrated primarily in metro-Detroit, Arab Americans live in 81 of Michigan's 83 counties. In Michigan, and across the U.S., cities, townships, cultural institutions, and other organizations celebrate April as Arab American Heritage Month and we are happy to count CPL  among them. Check out the resources below to learn more.  

Places to visit, volunteer, or donate

Larry McMurtry, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Lonesome Dove, has died.  A prolific writer, McMurtry penned 29 novels and wrote dozens of screenplays.  Many of McMurtry's books have been turned into award-winning films and television series, including Hud, The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, and Lonesome Dove.  McMurtry won an Academy Award for adapting E. Annie Proulx's short story Brokeback Mountain into a screenplay (with writing partner Diana Ossana).  Larry McMurtry lives on through his contributions to Western literature, film, and popular culture. 

Selected Works

Lonesome Dove : a novel by Larry McMurtry
Also available in: video | e-video

When Beverly Cleary started elementary school, she was assigned to the "low reader" group. She didn't enjoy reading, didn't like the books at school and struggled to read them. Then one rainy day, bored at home, Beverly picked up The Dutch Twins by Lucy Fitch Perkins - and everything changed. Beverly was interested in this story, about the everyday adventures and antics of two siblings, and she really did enjoy reading!

From then on, Beverly went to the library to find books that she wanted to read. After college, Mrs. Cleary became a children's librarian and began to write her own books about the everyday adventures and antics of a group of kids on Klickitat Street. You may know them - Ramona and Beatrice "Beezus" Quimby, or Henry Huggins and his dog Ribsy. Mrs. Cleary wrote dozens of books that engaged children, including The Mouse and the Motorcycle and the Newberry Award-winning Dear Mr. Henshaw

Beverly Cleary had a gift for capturing the essence of childhood, what it feels like to be a kid, and respectfully representing the inner lives of children. Mrs. Cleary's work has been translated into twenty-eight languages and touched the lives of children around the world. Twenty years ago, the Library of Congress named Beverly Cleary a Living Legend and, though Mrs. Cleary has passed, that legend lives on through her books and their readers. 

"Quite often somebody will say, ‘what year do your books take place?’ and the only answer I can give is, ‘in childhood.’" - Beverly Cleary

A Selection Beverly Cleary's Books

 

If you or someone you know is interested in getting the COVID-19 vaccine, please see below for info on where and how to get registered for an appointment. The information on registering for the vaccine and scheduling appointments by telephone is particularly useful for those without smartphones, email, or internet access. Please share widely with any family, friends, and neighbors, especially seniors, who would like to get vaccinated.

*This information is current as of 3/31/2021.

I need help scheduling an appointment

  • MI residents who need help scheduling a vaccine appointment can call the COVID-19 Hotline at 888-535-6136 (press 1), M- F 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM, Sat - Sun 8:00 AM - 1:00 PM, or call 2-1-1.

  • Senior citizens in Wayne county who need help scheduling an appointment may call the Wayne County Health Department at 734-727-7101.

  • Canton residents who need help scheduling an appointment may call the Township Clerk's office at 734-394-5120 or the Township Supervisor's office at 734-394-5185 Monday - Friday 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM.

The following books for upper-elementary and middle school kids feature stories that affirm Black lives, bodies, experiences, and culture. These books also offer opportunities for discussion about racial injustice among parents and children of all races.

Chapter Books and Novels

As brave as you by Jason Reynolds
Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook | large print

When Genie and his older brother spend their summer in the country with their grandparents, he learns a secret about his grandfather and what it means to be brave.

The following picture books affirm Black lives, bodies, experiences, and culture, and offer opportunities for discussion about racial injustice among parents and children of all races.

Picture Books

A is for activist by Innosanto Nagara

A is for Activist is an ABC board book written and illustrated for families who want their kids to grow up in a space that is unapologetic about activism, environmental justice, civil rights, LGBTQ rights, and everything else that activists believe in and fight for. The alliteration, rhyming, and vibrant illustrations make the book exciting for children, while the issues it brings up resonate with their parents' values of community, equality, and justice. 

On March 4, 1797, George Washington turned over his job to John Adams, winner of the presidential election. This Inauguration Day, over 200 years ago, was the first time one U.S. President replaced another. The peaceful transition of power on Inauguration Day is a crucial part of what makes the U.S. a democracy. Check out the books below to learn more about our democratic system of government. 

Becoming president by Michael Rajczak
Civics by Shannon Weber

2021 LEGO® Contest: Looking Forward

Attention Builders! It’s time for our annual (virtual, this year) LEGO® Building Contest. This year is all about Looking Forward. What are you looking forward to?  What have you missed doing during the past year? What are you excited to do when the pandemic is over? Use your LEGO®, Duplo, or Megablocks to show us! 

Once you've built your masterpiece, complete this registration form and submit the link to a 60-second video or 3-5 photos showcasing your LEGO® creation. Submissions are due Friday, February 12, 2021 at 6:00 PM. Winners will be announced on the evening of February 22 with a LEGO® Contest Celebration video on our website. 

Contest Details

  • Divisions are based on age: K-2nd, 3rd-4th, 5th-6th, 7th-8th, 9th-adult. 
  • Submissions are due February 12, 2021 by 6:00 PM. Submissions include a completed registration form along with the link to a 60-second video or 3-5 photos showcasing your LEGO® creation. 
  • Winners will be announced on February 22 via video on our website.  

Contest Rules

  • Use your own LEGO®, Duplo, Megablocks or other LEGO® compatible plastic bricks and materials.

  • Entries must be your own creation, not a LEGO® designed kit or a project found online, in a book, or in a magazine.

  • Each person may enter only once. You may enter as an individual OR as part of a family team, but not both. Team entries will be judged in the age category of the oldest team member.

  • By entering, you are granting Canton Public Library permission to show your photos or clips of your video in its LEGO® Contest Celebration video on February 22.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

The following fiction and non-fiction titles may be enjoyed by children in second grade. Please remember, readers have different interests and read at different levels so not all of these titles will appeal to, or be appropriate for, every second grader. 

For more specific recommendations, we encourage you to chat with the librarian at the Children's Desk about your child's reading interests or use our May We Suggest form

Fiction Titles

A young boy in Concord, Massachusetts, who loves superheroes and comes from a long line of brave Chinese farmer-warriors, wants to make friends but first he must overcome his fear of everything.

The following fiction and non-fiction titles may be enjoyed by children in sixth grade. Please remember, readers have different interests and read at different levels so not all of these titles will appeal to, or be appropriate for, every sixth grader. 

For more specific recommendations, we encourage you to chat with the librarian at the Children's Desk about your child's reading interests or use our May We Suggest form. 

Fiction Titles

Awkward by artist 1979- Svetlana Chmakova

After shunning Jaime, the school nerd, on her first day at a new middle school, Penelope Torres tries to blend in with her new friends in the art club, until the art club goes to war with the science club, of which Jaime is a member.

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