Teens

Reaching for the Moon book cover

 

Katherine Johnson was a talented mathematician in a field dominated by white men.

After graduating high school at the age of 15 in the midst of the Great Depression, she earned a full scholarship to West Virginia State Institute's math department. Johnson briefly taught high school and then in 1940 was one of the first Black graduate students chosen to integrate West Virginia University.

In 1953 she began work as a research mathematician for what would become NASA. Katherine Johnson shattered barriers for all women, but particularly for Black women, earning the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2015.

To celebrate the inspirational life of Katherine Johnson, check out the resources below or explore NASA's website. Learn about her and other amazing barrier-breaking mathematicians and scientists.

This is Johnson's autobiography, but there are many books to introduce readers to her life in the Children's Biography collection.

U of M Stamps School of Art & Design STEAM Workshop: Mehndi Art

one hand painting henna art designs onto another hand

The cultures of India, Africa, and the Middle East often include a form of body art called Mehndi or Henna. Painted as a temporary tattoo using henna dye, Mehndi patterns are not only beautiful but also offer a rich source of geometric and computational thinking. During this workshop, you can learn about where Mehndi comes from, what the patterns symbolize, and even create your own Mehndi designs using the software provided in the workshop. Program is designed for patrons aged 12-17. Please bring your own laptop if possible. This program has been postponed until further notice.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Inaugurated in 2016, the annual Walter Dean Myers Awards for Outstanding Children's Literature recognize diverse authors (or co-authors) whose works feature diverse main characters and address diversity in a meaningful way. Two to four Honor Books are also named annually. We Need Diverse Books defines “diverse” to be one or more of the following: a person of color, Native American, LGBTQIA, a person with a disability, and/or a member of a marginalized religious or cultural minority in the United States.

The Walters include two categories: Teen (ages 13-18) and Younger Readers (ages 9-13).

For more information about this award and its current and past recipients, check the We Need Diverse Books website.

Help us recognize these honorees and winners by checking one out today.

2020 Walter Award Winner, Teen Category

The American Library Association just announced the top youth books and media of 2019, including the Alex Awards. The Young Adult Library Services Association awards the Alex Award to books written for adults that will likely appeal to young adults. 

For more information about this award and its current and past recipients, check the ALA website.

Help us recognize these honorees and winners by checking one out today.

2020 Alex Winners

The American Library Association just announced the top youth books and media of 2019, including the YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction. The Young Adult Library Services Association honors the best nonfiction book published for young adults.

For more information about this award and its current and past recipients, check the ALA website.

Help us recognize these honorees and winners by checking one out today.

2020 YALSA Nonfiction Winner

Free lunch by Rex Ogle

The American Library Association just announced the top youth books and media of 2019, including the William C. Morris Award. The Young Adult Library Services Association awards the Morris to a book published by a first-time author writing for teens and celebrating impressive new voices in young adult literature. 

For more information about this award and its current and past recipients, check the ALA website.

Help us recognize these honorees and winners by checking one out today.

2020 Morris Award Winner

Teen Winter Party

Join us in celebrating the end of winter! Enjoy making your personalized hot chocolate at our hot chocolate bar while enjoying the movie Ice Age. Compete in our cookie decorating contest and prove that you have the best cookie design!

No registration required. Ages 11-18.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

There exists no universal story of immigration, no book that encapsulates every aspect of crossing over. However, these authors have drawn on their experiences, or those of their family, to create thoughtful portraits of moving to America. The titles below, some fiction and some non-fiction, explore the joys and struggles of immigration through a first-hand lens. Check one out today.

American street by Ibi Aanu Zoboi

The Wuhan coronavirus outbreak is dominating the news of late as health experts try to prevent  this deadly virus from becoming an epidemic. So far, there are confirmed cases in the U.S., Australia, Asia and France. Coronavirus is part of a large family of viruses that severely debilitates the respiratory system. Across the U.S. and in China, scientists are racing to create a vaccine. The NIH and WHO recommends the general public heed travel advisories and to seek medical attention if any signs and symptoms appear. Good advice! Want to learn more? Here's some suggestions...

How close are we to having another worldwide health crisis? Epidemiologists predict that another pandemic is coming--one that could kill hundreds of millions of people. Learn about factors that contribute to the spread of disease by examining past pandemics and epidemics. Examine case studies of potential pandemic diseases, and discover how scientists strive to contain and control the spread of disease both locally and globally. See how human activities such as global air travel and the disruption of animal habitats contribute to the risk of a new pandemic. And investigate the challenges we face with antibiotic-resistant bacteria and mutating viruses. Can scientists control the spread of disease and prevent the next pandemic?

Ever since the 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic, scientists have dreamed of preventing catastrophic outbreaks of infectious disease. Yet despite a century of medical progress, viral and bacterial disasters continue to take us by surprise, inciting panic and dominating news cycles. From the Spanish flu to the 1924 outbreak of pneumonic plague in Los Angeles to the 1930 "parrot fever" pandemic, through the more recent SARS, Ebola, and Zika epidemics, the last one hundred years have been marked by a succession of unanticipated pandemic alarms.In The Pandemic Century, a lively account of scares both infamous and less known, Mark Honigsbaum combines reportage with the history of science and medical sociology to artfully reconstruct epidemiological mysteries and the ecology of infectious diseases. We meet dedicated disease detectives, obstructive or incompetent public health officials, and brilliant scientists often blinded by their own knowledge of bacteria and viruses. We also see how fear of disease often exacerbates racial, religious, and ethnic tensions--even though, as the epidemiologists Malik Peiris and Yi Guan write, "'nature' remains the greatest bioterrorist threat of all."Like man-eating sharks, predatory pathogens are always present in nature, waiting to strike; when one is seemingly vanquished, others appear in its place. These pandemics remind us of the limits of scientific knowledge, as well as the role that human behavior and technologies play in the emergence and spread of microbial diseases.

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