Seniors

Genealogy @ Your Library: FamilySearch.org

FamilySearch.org is a free searchable genealogical resource sponsored by the Church of Latter Day Saints. In addition to having billions of searchable records, it also has a vast amount of educational information regarding genealogy.  Join us as we explore this free family history treasure trove.

No registration is necessary.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

April 2, 1513.  Spanish explorer Ponce De Leon sighted Florida and claimed it for Spain. His landing site is now present day St. Augustine -  the oldest city in the continental United States.

April 2, 1792.  Congress established the first U.S. Mint in the city of Philadelphia.

The Cold War : a new history by John Lewis Gaddis

April 4, 1949. NATO (the North Atlantic Treaty Organization) was created with the signing of a treaty by twelve nations united for common military defense against the threat of expansion by Soviet Russia into Western Europe.

Volunteers needed!

We are all eyewitnesses to history as it unfolds in this time of social distancing, toilet-paper hoarding, business closures and even Some Good News. This crisis is affecting us all in different ways. What is your story?

Please consider recording your daily experiences, thoughts, and feelings in diary form, either in writing or video, to submit to the COVID-19: Share Your Story project. The Library of Michigan is looking to collect and preserve these stories of daily lives during the COVID-19 Pandemic to provide future historians, researchers, and students with information and data on daily life in Michigan communities during this crisis.

Submit your story to Librarian@Michigan.gov. ​

For details, visit the Library of Michigan Share Your Story project website.  

International Food Day

Join us in a celebration of cultures at the International Food Day in the Community Room on Sunday, April 19 from 1:00-3:00PM. Connect with neighbors and friends and enjoy a range of dishes from around the world! 

No registration is required to attend.

[Specialty foods by IFPRI-IMAGES is licensed under CC BY 2.0]

Upcoming sessions

Note:
Cancelled
Sunday, April 19 - 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM Community Room

Did you know that popular, bestselling authors frequently have their titles simultaneously released in regular print and large print (as well as in audiobook and e-book formats)? And for those titles, such as J.D. Robb's Golden in Death below, the library has you covered. We strive to purchase enough titles to keep hold lists manageable and in the format that you are interested in. For each book listed below, additional formats are highlighted.

Also available in: print

Levitin looks at the science behind what we all can learn from those who age joyously, as well as how to adapt our culture to take full advantage of older people's wisdom and experience. Throughout his exploration of what aging really means, using research from developmental neuroscience and the psychology of individual differences, Levitin reveals resilience strategies and practical, cognitive enhancing tricks everyone should do as they age.

Successful Aging inspires a powerful new approach to how readers think about our final decades, and it will revolutionize the way we plan for old age as individuals, family members, and citizens within a society where the average life expectancy continues to rise. 

Also available in: print

When they were children in the suburbs of Los Angeles in the 1950s, Diane Keaton and her younger brother, Randy, were best friends and companions: they shared stories at night in their bunk beds; they swam, laughed, dressed up for Halloween. Their mother captured their American-dream childhoods in her diaries, and on camera. But as they grew up, Randy became troubled, then reclusive. By the time he reached adulthood, he was divorced, an alcoholic, a man who couldn't hold on to full-time work--his life a world away from his sister's, and from the rest of their family.

Now Diane is delving into the nuances of their shared, and separate, pasts to confront the difficult question of why and how Randy ended up living his life on "the other side of normal." In beautiful and fearless prose that's intertwined with photographs, journal entries, letters, and poetry--many of them Randy's own writing and art--this insightful memoir contemplates the inner workings of a family, the ties that hold it together, and the special bond between siblings even when they are pulled far apart. Here is a story about love and responsibility: about how, when we choose to reach out to the people we feel closest to--in moments of difficulty and loss--surprising things can happen. A story with universal echoes, Brother & Sister speaks across generations to families whose lives have been touched by the fragility and "otherness" of loved ones--and to brothers and sisters everywhere.

Marie Curie. Eleanor Roosevelt. Susan B. Anthony. Elizabeth I of England. Florence Nightingale. These remarkable women are well known to most of us, but there are many others in history just as remarkable whose names may not be as recognizable. In honor of Women's History Month we should all make some time to learn about them by reading some of the many biographies to found in the library's collection:

March 1, 1781. The Articles of Confederation were ratified by Congress. Under the Articles, Congress was the sole governing body of the new American national government, which consisted of the 13 original states. They remained in effect throughout  the Revolutionary War, until the U.S. Constitution was adopted in 1789.

March 1, 1932. The 20-month-old son of  Charles A. Lindbergh was kidnapped from his home in Hopewell, New Jersey.

March 1, 1974.  Seven former high-ranking officials of the Nixon White House  - including former chief of staff, H.R. Haldeman, top aide John Ehrichman, and former attorney general, John Mitchell - were indicted for conspiring to obstruct the investigation into the Watergate break-in.

Subscribe to RSS - Seniors