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Technology

Chrome Extension 2.0

If you're like 10% of CPL website visitors, you came here in Google Chrome. Chrome is a fast, secure, easy-to-use web browser — and the improved CPL extension is just one more reason to use it.

Books at CPL

As you browse the web, the extension finds books mentioned on each site. For instance, if you're shopping for a book on Amazon, a subtle notification will appear with a direct link to the book in our catalog. This feature stays out of your way (it disappears automatically after 15 seconds) and respects your privacy.

Search Quickly

When you want to search the CPL Catalog, just type "cpl" into the omnibox. This temporarily switches the search engine to the Catalog, and provides title suggestions as you type. If one of the suggestions is the book you want, just arrow down to it and press Enter or click on the result.

Get the Extension

If you'd like to know when the books you find are available at your library, and if you'd like an easier way to search our Catalog, you can
install the free extension at Chrome Web Store
[web developers: cpl-chrome-ext is available on GitHub]

Tech Town Open House

You are invited to TechTown's Open House on Tuesday, February 7 from 5:00-7:00 PM. Register at the TechTown site or call 313-879-5250.

If you have an idea for a new product or business or need help developing your idea, tour TechTown's facilities, learn how they can help you, or chat with TechTown's entrepenuer of the month at their this monthly open house.

NPR Lists Best Video Games for 2011

Batman Arkam City tops the list with The Elder Scroll V: Skyrim and Minecraft. To view the entire list check out NPR. Is there anything the reviewers missed?

eBook Users Group

Join library staff and other eReader users as we share eBook tips and tricks in an informal environment. Group will meet Tuesday January 17th, 7:00-8:00 PM in the Purple Room.

Khan Academy — Free Educational Fun

Khan Academy is a free, fun, educational and totally awesome organization. The goal of Khan Academy is to change "education for the better by providing a free world-class education to anyone anywhere." The site contains over 2,700 videos on math, physics, biology, chemistry, finance and art. Students, parents, coaches, and teachers can use Khan Academy in many ways. Teachers and homeschool parents can use this resource to coordinate classwork and monitor student work. Kids looking for homework help can find explanations and practice examples on the virtual scratch pad. Adults looking for continuing education opportunities will find help here as well.

National Book Awards 2011 Announced

Videos and images from the November 15 award ceremony are now available on the National Book Foundation website. John Lithgow, actor, writer, and musician was NBA Dinner and Ceremony host.

Salvage the bones: a novel by Jesmyn Ward

The swerve: how the world became modern by Stephen Greenblatt

Inside out & back again by Thanhha Lai

eBook Basics

Join us Tuesday January 24th from 6:30 to 8:00 PM and learn the basics of how to check out free library eBooks and read them on your Kindle, Nook, iPad or other device. Watch a live demo and try a few of the eReaders on the market today. Registration begins January 10th.

Older Adults: November 2011

Send your parents a Tech Support Care Package. Google has created a series of short videos demonstrating simple computer tasks such as changing the time on a computer, enlarging the text, copy and paste materials, and more.

WordPress to Webpage

Connect to others by converting a free WordPress blog page into a webpage — no HTML taught or needed. Join us forWordPress to Webpage on Friday, November 4th from 10:00-11:30 AM. If you've ever wanted to create your own webpage but found HTML too complicated, give this program a try!

This post is licensed under the GNU General Public License.

Welcome to the J600-699 Collection

What kind of dog do you wish you had? How fast does a Corvette really go? What does the inside of the human body look like? If you have ever asked yourselves these questions and more, then you should definitely visit the J600-699 collection in the Children's Section. This is the nonfiction collection that is chock full of cats, cars, pets, cooking, gardening, health, body parts, and so much more. See you in the stacks!

Gadget Night

Thinking of buying an eReader but aren't sure which model is right for you? Do you have an iPad on your holiday gift list but aren't sure if it is something you would really use? Join us Tuesday October 11, 2011 from 7:00-8:00 PM in the Purple Room and we haul out some of today's hottest gadgets for you to test and try before you buy. Come play with our eReaders, iPad, digital cameras and even video games.

October 7th is Ada Lovelace Day

Today, October 7th, is Ada Lovelace Day. Ada Lovelace, daughter of poet Lord Byron, is regarded to be the first computer programmer. In honor of her, this day is designated for the recognition of the achievements of women in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. It would be a great day to check out a book on women inventors, astronaunts, or mathematicians. Or stimulate your own daughter's interest in one or more of these subjects with one of our many science films from here in the library. My favorite is the Disney Imagineering Series. Another good option is The Way Things Work, based of the David Macauley book by the same name.

Voice Control

At today's Let's talk iPhone event, Apple VP Phil Shiller announced Siri, an advanced voice-activated control system included with the new iPhone 4S. Even though this is an exciting step forward, computers have had speech recognition for years, and movies and television have simulated it for even longer. Here are some examples of fictional computers in movies that could hold a conversation:

2001 [videodisc]: a space odyssey by Metro-Goldwyn- Mayer

Magazine Express

As the Canton Public Library continues to deal with a declining budget, patrons are reminded the "magazine express" program has been discontinued.

Death of the Book—and Other Good News

Thursday, October 6, 4:00-5:30pm
Lecture at Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, Gallery (use Diag entrance)
913 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI

According to Dan Okrent, "The digital revolution has upended the roles of bookstores, libraries, publishers, and, of course, readers. It’s the biggest change in the world of words since Gutenberg, and may turn out to be just as beneficial—or even more so." Daniel Okrent is best known as the first public editor at the New York Times, but he first spent more than 25 years in magazine and book publishing. He has written several books, including Great Fortune: The Epic of Rockefeller Center, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in history. He also attended the University of Michigan and worked on the Michigan Daily.

Public parking is available in the structure at 650 S. Forest, just south of S. University. Free and open to the public

The Age of Piracy

Theft is a problem endemic to human nature. But what if theft were a victimless crime? In the computer age, copying a file from a friend or from the web has become easy and widespread; and it is often criminal in nature. The following books give insight into whether this is a problem of enforcement, of intellectual property laws, or of both:

The pirate's dilemma : how youth culture is reinventing capitalism by Matt Mason

Downloading copyrighted stuff from the Internet : stealing or fair use? by Sherri Mabry Gordon

Recycling Electronics

Canton Senior Center, in partnership with Cellular Recyclers, is collecting old cell phones, laptops, game systems, digital cameras, and iPods. Recycleble items should be dropped off at the Canton Senior Center at the Summit. Call the Canton Senior Center at 734-394-5485 for more information.

QR Codes

By now, you have probably noticed these funny looking boxes on everything from cereal to restaurant menus. You have also probably wondered what the heck they are and if they matter to you. Well, these black and white squares are actually called QR codes, a type of 2D barcode meant to be read by smartphones. Originally created by a Toyota subsidiary in Japan to track automotive parts, these black and white boxes are now being used to pass along text, web addresses and all sorts of information to smartphones. Companies are using these codes to direct customers to everything from sweepstakes entry forms to job applications. Get scanning today with one of the many smartphone apps that enable you to scan and read QR codes — like NeoReader & BeeTagg Reader (just to name a few).