Science

Picture Books About Outer Space

Star seeker: a journey to outer space by Theresa Heine, Victor Tavares

Stars! Stars! Stars! by written and illustrated by Nancy Elizabeth Wallace

Full Moon and star by Lee Bennett Hopkins ; illustrated by Marcellus Hall

How to catch a star by Oliver Jeffers

Stars by Mary Lyn Ray and ; [illustrated by] Marla Frazee

Women in Science & Technology

The 2013 theme for National Women's History Month is "Women Inspiring Through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics." In that spirt, check out some of the following titles acknowledging the tremendous contributions of women to science and technology throughout history:

Jocelyn Elders, M.D.: from sharecropper's daughter to surgeon general of the United States of America by Joycelyn Elders and David Chanoff — Jocelyn Elders, pediatrician, public health administrator & the first woman Surgeon General of the United States

Beautiful: the life of Hedy Lamarr by Stephen Michael Shearer — Hedy Lamarr, actress, scientist, inventor & mathematician

Miss Leavitt's stars: the untold story of the woman who discovered how to measure the universe by George Johnson — Henrietta Swan Leavitt, groundbreaking American astronomer

University of Michigan FSR Workshops: Can you Feel the Beat?

This year at CPL, the University of Michigan's Museum of Natural History presents a series of three, fun Family Reading and Science workshops titled Just Like me: exploring culture, biology and the human experience. To tie in with their temporary exhibition at the museum called RACE: Are we so different? (February 2013-June 2013), they are focusing on and exploring how biology, anthropology, physics, geography and chemistry all play a part in race and culture.

STEM Program Series: Supermarket Science

2nd-5th Graders: Join us Tuesday, February 19th at 7:00 PM in the Purple Room for science demonstrations and hands-on experiments using items you can find in your own kitchen or pantry! See the incredible bouncing egg, create a secret message or painting with invisible ink, and more.  Registration begins January 25 and is limited to the first 25 kids, so sign up today!

Watch "Great Lakes Now Connect: Invasive Species"

The Nature Conservancy announced a first-of-its-kind television and Web special, designed to convene a discussion on the solutions to the threats posed by dangerous invasive species in the Great Lakes. This special event "Great Lakes Now Connect: Invasive Species" broadcast on January 15, but you can still view it as an archive. For more information on invasive species search CPL's Science in Context database for "invasive species" or "biological invasions."

[Goby by Ohio Sea Grant and Stone Laboratory is licensed by CC BY-NC 2.0]

University of Michigan FRS Workshops: Everybody Cooks!

This year at CPL, the University of Michigan's Museum of Natural History presents a series of three, fun Family Reading and Science workshops titled Just Like me: exploring culture, biology and the human experience. To tie in with their temporary exhibition at the museum called RACE: Are we so different? (February 2013-June 2013), they are focusing on and exploring how biology, anthropology, physics, geography and chemistry all play a part in race and culture.

We invite you to register for the second of three monthly workshops in the series titled Everybody Cooks! Exploring how geology, geography and human migration influenced food. The workshop takes place in the Community Room on Saturday, February 9, 2013, from 1:00-2:00 PM. You will learn that every culture has a cuisine, but why do the same ingredients, cooking techniques or types of food pop up all over the world? Families will learn how geology and geography relate to food, what "cultural transmission" is, and will also get to make their very own bread starter. Workshops are designed for children ages 6-11, accompanied by an adult. Online registration begins January 25.

Year 2012 Top Non-Fiction Books Picks

Our favorite reads this year from the Adult and Children/Tweens/Teens Librarians:

Behind the beautiful forevers by Katherine Boo

We've got a job: the 1963 Birmingham Children's March by Cynthia Levinson

The righteous mind: why good people are divided by politics and religion by Jonathan Haidt

Quiet: the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking by Susan Cain

Paris: a love story: a memoir by Kati Marton

Harry Potter's World: Renaissance Science, Magic and Medicine

CPL is pleased to host Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine. This fantastic travelling exhibit, curated by the History of Medicine Division of the National Library of Medicine, explores the world of Harry Potter and its roots in Renaissance magic, science, and medicine. In 1997, British author J.K. Rowling introduced the world to Harry Potter and a literary phenomenon was born. Although a fantasy story, the magic in the Harry Potter books is partially based on Renaissance traditions that played an important role in the development of Western science and medicine. Come to CPL from October 22 to November 30 and read all about the potions, immortality, monsters and more written within the pages of the incredible, ground-breaking series.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Science