Saturday STEM: Projectiles

Children in ages 7-10 interested in science, technology, engineering and math will learn something new each month in a STEM topic. This month, test your engineering skills assembling catapults. Let's see which one can make a projectile fly the farthest, the highest, and the longest. Registration is required and begins June 24th.

Image of Popsicle Stick Catapult is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Saturday STEM: Maps

Children in ages 7-10 interested in science, technology, engineering and math will learn something new each month in a STEM topic. In honor of National Trails Day, our focus will be geography. Learn about longitude and latitude, how to read a map, and navigate. Registration begins May 24.

Image of Child with Globe is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Canton Public Library has a large selection of interesting and entertaining documentary films.

Morgan Spurlock brings a comedic documentary about branding, advertising, and product placement that is financed and made possible by brands, advertising, and product placement. Special features: commentary, featurettes, and more.

Explores how environmental factors have influenced human history and civilizations from ancient times through the present day.

"For the past 35 years 12,000 people on 430 teams have come to Stevens Point, Wisconsin for The World's biggest Trivia Contest. Clustered together in basements, garages and converted storefronts for 54 straight hours..." 

The Canton Public Library has partnered with the University of Michigan’s Technical Communications department to bring a series of fun and exciting STEM workshops to the library. These workshops will present a wide range of topics in the science, technology, engineering and math disciplines. Each session has been designed and developed for kids aged 11 – 13 by engineering students at the university. Registration is required for each session.

The  Agatha Christie Awards nominees for best mysteries published in 2015 reflect a wide range of authors, publishers, styles, and themes. In the contemporary category, award-winning favorites Margaret Maron, Louise Penny, and Hank Phillipi Ryan share the honoree podium with newcomer Annette Dashofy and Catriona McPherson. The winners will be announced at Malice Domestic 28, which will be held April 29-May 1, 2016.  Check out what is available at Canton Public Library.

Best Contemporary Novel

Long upon the land by Margaret Maron
Also available in: e-book | audiobook | large print

On a quiet August morning, Judge Deborah Knott's father Kezzie makes a shocking discovery on a remote corner of his farm: the body of a man bludgeoned to death. Investigating this crime, Deborah's husband, Sheriff's Deputy Dwight Bryant, soon uncovers a long-simmering hostility between Kezzie and the slain man over a land dispute. The local newspaper implies that Deborah's family may have had something to do with the murder-and that Dwight is dragging his feet on the case. Meanwhile, Deborah is given a cigarette lighter that once belonged to her mother. The cryptic inscription inside rekindles Deborah's curiosity about her parents' past, and how they met. For years she has wondered how the daughter of a wealthy attorney could have married a widowed, semi-illiterate bootlegger, and this time she's determined to find the answer. But why are Deborah's brothers so reluctant to talk about the dead man? Is the murder linked to Kezzie's illegal whiskey business? And could his courtship of Deborah's mother have something to do with the bad blood between the two families? Despite Deborah's promise not to interfere in Dwight's work, she cannot stop herself from doing everything she can to help clear her brothers and her father from suspicion.

The child garden : a novel by Catriona McPherson

Eden was its name. "An alternative school for happy children." But it closed in disgrace after a student's suicide. Now it's a care home, the grounds neglected and overgrown. Gloria Harkness is its only neighbor, staying close to her son who lives in the home, lighting up her life and breaking her heart each day. When a childhood friend turns up at her door, Gloria doesn't hesitate before asking him in. He claims a girl from Eden is stalking him and has goaded him into meeting near the site of the suicide. Only then, the dead begin to speak--it was murder, they say. Gloria is in over her head before she can help it. Her loneliness, her loyalty, and her all-consuming love for her son lead her into the heart of a dark secret that threatens everything she lives for. 

Children in grades 2-5 interested in science, technology, engineering and math will learning something new each month in a STEM topic. This month, learn about sound waves and how they move. Saturday March 12, from 2:00-3:00 PM in the Community Room. Registration is required.

[image by tylerullery is licensed under CC BY 2.0]

This post contains suggestions for how to earn your Keep It Real: Super Bookworm badge.
Learn more and earn badges on the Connect Your Summer page.

Many of these nonfiction titles include actual digging, but others just dig up the facts. Many could be used to earn your Make History badge instead. 

Examines how a team of scientists and historians unearthed a Maryland homestead from the 1600s and details the painstaking work required to restore the ruin to its former glory.

This post contains suggestions for how to earn your Animal Lover: Super Bookworm badge.
Learn more and earn badges on the Connect Your Summer page.


Earn your Hit the Road Badge or your Animal Lover Badge when you travel with these animals on the move.

When a young Wilson's warbler named Sammy wakes up one morning, ready to start his first migratory journey to Panama, he finds that the other warblers have already left, so he looks for help from other animals, who each have their own way of getting through the winter.

Two little birds by Mary Newell DePalma

Two little birds make their first grand migration south, and later return home to start new families.

"Little Gray loved his lagoon and the humans who came to visit him there. One day, Mama announces that they must swim north to a far-away sea. At first he is sad to leave his home, but Little Gray soon realizes the importance of their journey. What happens along the way and how does Little Gray help his mother? Swim along with Little Gray as he finds the way to this special, food-filled sea."--.

2015 Non-Fiction Librarians' Picks

This year three of the picks were nominated by more than one librarian: Erik Larson's DEAD WAKE, Amy Poehler's YES PLEASE, and Jennifer Lawson's FURIOUSLY HAPPY.

From the #1 New York Times bestselling author and master of narrative nonfiction comes the enthralling story of the sinking of the Lusitania On May 1, 1915, with WWI entering its tenth month, a luxury ocean liner as richly appointed as an English country house sailed out of New York, bound for Liverpool, carrying a record number of children and infants. The passengers were surprisingly at ease, even though Germany had declared the seas around Britain to be a war zone. For months, German U-boats had brought terror to the North Atlantic. But the Lusitania was one of the era's great transatlantic "Greyhounds"--the fastest liner then in service--and her captain, William Thomas Turner, placed tremendous faith in the gentlemanly strictures of warfare that for a century had kept civilian ships safe from attack. Germany, however, was determined to change the rules of the game, and Walther Schwieger, the captain of Unterseeboot -20, was happy to oblige. 

Examines the pervasive fears and myths surrounding vaccines from a mother's perspective and identifies the historical and cultural factors that cause people to doubt government regulations and the medical establishment.

On August 16, 1824, an elderly French gentlemen sailed into New York Harbor and giddy Americans were there to welcome him. Or, rather, to welcome him back. It had been 30 years since the Revolutionary War hero the Marquis de Lafayette had last set foot in the United States, and he was so beloved that 80,000 people showed up to cheer for him. The entire population of New York at the time was 120,000. Lafayette's arrival in 1824 coincided with one of the most contentious presidential elections in American history. Congress had just fought its first epic battle over slavery, and the threat of a Civil War loomed. But Lafayette, belonging to neither North nor South, to no political party or faction, was a walking, talking reminder of the sacrifices and bravery of the revolutionary generation and what they wanted the country to be. His return was not just a reunion with his beloved Americans, it was a reunion for Americans with their own astonishing singular past. .

STEM Books for Young Readers

The Cook Prize honors the best STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) picture books published for children each year. Check out the winner or one of the honor books today. 


Galapagos George by Jean Craighead George ; paintings by Wendell Minor

Honor Books

Behold the beautiful dung beetle by Cheryl Bardoe ; illustrated by Alan Marks

Mr. Ferris and his wheel by written by Kathryn Gibbs Davis ; illustrated by Gilbert Ford

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