Catalog

Search our Catalog

Religion and Spirituality

Time was… Time is…

August 17 marks the 225th birthday of American legend Davy Crockett. Although much lore surrounds the life of the coonskin-capped frontiersman, the truth is actually a different story–and just as interesting. History buffs will find Michael Wallis' new biography, David Crockett: The Lion of the West, a compelling portrait of the man.

Campy: The Two Lives of Roy Campanella by Neil Lanctot

Bootleggers, Lobstermen & Lumberjacks: Fifty of the Grittiest Moments in the History of Hardscrabble New England by Matthew P.

J200 — Religion and Spirituality

Are you looking for something different? Interested in Mythology or Religion? The J200-299's are the collection for you. Come and explore Mythology from all over the world including, Greek Myths, Roman Myths, and Norse Myths. Learn more about your own Religion or delve into someone else's. Enjoy!

The 100 Thing Challenge

The 100 thing challenge : how I got rid of almost everything, remade my life, and regained my soul by Dave Bruno — Do you ever feel like you have too much clutter in your life? Like maybe the stuff that surrounds you is threatening to take over? Dave Bruno had that feeling, and he decided to winnow his belongings down to only 100 items. This book talks about how he did it and the impact it had on his life, which was far greater than just having fewer possessions. His blog's motto is "Reduce - Refuse - Rejigger" and offers continued insights like those contained in this book.

What year is 2011 in Chinese?

The Year of 2011 is the Year of the Golden Rabbit, which begins on February 3, 2011 and ends on January 22, 2012. The Rabbit is the 4th sign in the Chinese zodiac which consists of 12 animals signs. To find your sign, click on China Today web. The Rabbit is a lucky sign. People born in the Year of the Rabbit are reasonably friendly individuals who enjoy the company of a group of good friends. For more information on Chinese horoscopes, see these sources in our library. For information on how Chinese New Year is celebrated, including legends, food, and taboos, see this China Facts page.

Tai Chi

Join us for a Tai Chi session on February 5 at 2:00PM in the Purple Room. We're celebrating the township's 100 Days of Health by providing a class here at the library. Tai Chi can be enjoyed by everyone 16 and up. Please wear loose clothing and comfy shoes. Please register online as space is limited.

Christmas Traditions, Why Are They?

Who made the first Nativity Scene? What is the symbolic meaning of the candy cane, the holly leaf or the Christmas tree? How did the legend of Santa Claus begin and why is kissing associated with mistletoe? Answers to these and other legends may be found at this website link.

To check out information on Christmas customs, crafts, recipes, movies, music, stories, legends, (or more), check out these sources in our library to enhance your enjoyment of this beautiful season!

U.S. News & World Report

The Dec/2010 issue of U.S. News contains 50 Ways to Improve Your Life in 2011. Articles concerning your health, money, career, mind and the world are included. Please note this will be the last issue of U.S. News & World Report. This magazine will no longer be published as a print or digital replica magazine. The U.S. Media group will continue to publish the usnews.com website.

Diwali

Diwali is a Hindu holiday celebrated by Hindus wherever they live in the world. The name "Diwali" comes from the word "Deepavali" which means "row of Lights". This festival is the most widely celebrated festival in India, although the celebrations differ from place to place. There are some things about the festival that are common across the world. Some of these aspects are lighting of lamps, called "diyas", cleaning and sometimes painting homes, feasting with family and friends. The most important meaning of the festival is the celebration of the truimph of good over evil. It is also a time for renewing hopes for happiness and prosperity in life. The festival of Diwali can last up to five days. In 2010 the main celebration falls on Friday, November 5th. So Happy Diwali to everyone.

30 Favorite Religious Thrillers Like The Da Vinci Code

A "religious thriller" is a suspense novel whose plot is closely connected to religious objects, institutions or questions. Here are 30 of my favorites I've enjoyed throughout the years:

Cross bones by Kathy Reichs

Salvation in death by J.D. Robb

Angels & demons by Dan Brown

MAP Program Updates

Starting October 1, 2010 Museum Adventure Pass kicks off with nine new participants. Added to the program are:The following organizations will no longer be participating:
  • Cranbrook House and Gardens
  • Ford Rouge Factory Tour
  • Henry Ford Estate, Fairlane
  • Paint Creek Center for the Arts

Living Book: Lauren Mitchell


My name is Lauren Mitchell. I am a life-long Christian and current seminary student who has held many different positions in the church over the years. My father and grandfather were also Christian ministers. I have attended both Protestant and Catholic schools in my lifetime and have always attempted to live a faith-filled, Christian life.

Meet Lauren and ask him your questions as part of our Living Books program. To learn more, drop by our Meet & Greet on Saturday, September 25, from 1:00-3:00PM.

If You Like Bible Fiction

Bible Fiction: Stories whose characters may not all be real people, and in which some of the events may be fiction, but are based on history, stories or prophecies from the Bible.
If you like Bible Fiction, try these books:

Faith of my fathers : a novel by Lynn Austin

Among the gods by Lynn Austin

Gods & Kings by Lynn Austin

Helping Children Cope with Loss

Loss, of a loved one or pet, can be very difficult for children to understand and deal with. Here are some books that can help parents and caregivers with the task of helping children through the process of grieving that special someone.

I will remember you: what to do when someone you love dies: a guidebook through grief for teens by Laura Dower


150 facts about grieving children by Erin Linn


Immigration, Islam, and Identity: A Conversation with Eli Eteraz

Children of Dust a memoir written by Ali Eteraz reveals Islamic fundamentalism and madrassa life in rural Pakistan, the culture shock of moving to the U.S., and a journey of reconciliation to the modern Middle East. Author Ali Eteraz will speak on Wednesday, April 21st, 2010 at 12:00pm in the University of Michigan's Hatcher Graduate Library, Gallery - Room 100 (use Diag entrance).

Holocaust Memorial Day

Today, April 12th, is Holocaust Memorial Day. For Jews, their history, their family, and their relationship with God have shaped their religion and their identity. After the horrors of the Holocaust, the Jewish people wanted a day to memorialize this tragedy. To learn more about the Holocaust, visit the web site or the Farmington Hills location of the Holocaust Museum. For a website with information and links about the Holocaust, see this about.com Holocaust website. For our library resources, see the subject Holocaust.

Father Dowling Creator Dead at 80

Prominent Catholic author, professor, and cultural commentator Ralph McInerny died last Thursday, January 29 at the age of 80. McInerny was the creator of the popular Father Dowling mystery series, which became a television series starring Tom Bosley and Tracie Nelson in the 80s. A prolific writer, McInerny also wrote the University of Notre Dame Mysteries, the Andrew Broom mysteries, and several books under the name Monica Quill.

Happy Groundhog Day!

Groundhog Day is rooted in a German superstition that if an animal casts its shadow on February 2nd, which is the Christian holiday of Candlemas, bad weather is coming. (Candlemas is the feast of the purification of Mary, Jesus' mother, in the Catholic Church, and is so called because mass is preceded by the distribution of candles.)

Groundhog Day was first celebrated in the U.S. as a Pennsylvania German (so called Pennsylvania Dutch) custom around the 17th and 18th century. This tradition goes back even further in time when the ancient Romans conquered the Teutons or Germanic peoples in the north and brought this custom with them. If the groundhog came out of its den and cast a shadow, 6 more weeks of winter were imminent.

The ancient Celtic pagan festival of Imbolc, celebrated this same day, is traditionally a time of weather prediction, and the old tradition of watching to see if serpents or badgers came from their winter dens is perhaps a precursor to Groundhog Day. Fire and purification are important aspects of this festival. The lighting of candles and burning of bonfires in the snow represented the return of warmth and increasing power of the Sun over the coming months.

For more information on this holiday, see the book Groundhog Day in our collection. For more on Candlemas, see Celebrations of Light, also in our library collection.