Realistic Fiction

Mind Over Matter: Neurological Challenges in Fiction

Neurological challenges, such as Alzheimer's, stroke, and amnesia, are, in many ways, still a mystery to modern medicine.  These books take a fictitious look at the ways that these disorders affect both the patient and their loved ones.

The art of forgetting by Camille Noe Pagán

Before I go to sleep: a novel by S.J. Watson

Left neglected: a novel by Lisa Genova

Still Alice: a novel by Lisa Genova

Turn of mind by Alice LaPlante

Book Club Choices: March 2012

A good man is hard to find and other stories by Flannery O'Connor

The house of the seven gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne; edited with an introduction by Milton R. Stern

A prayer for Owen Meany: a novel by John Irving

To the lighthouse by Woolf, Virginia, 1882-1941

Woman on the edge of time by Marge Piercy

Murder Will Out: March 2012

Are you looking for something new? Short Story collections are the perfect way for Mystery fans to try new authors.

A study in Sherlock: stories inspired by the Holmes Canon edited by Laurie R. King and Leslie S. Klinger

The best American mystery stories 2011 edited and with an introduction by Harlan Coben

Hook, line & sinister edited by T. Jefferson Parker

Original sins: a Crime Writers' Association anthology edited by Martin Edwards

The Black Lizard big book of Black Mask stories edited and with a foreword by Otto Penzler

Animal Ark and Secrets of Droon Are on the Move

If you are looking for the books either the Animal Ark series or The Secrets of Droon, they will be unavailable for a few days as they make their move from J Series to the J Fiction collection. Thanks for your patience!

What We're Reading: April 2012

Murder Will Out: February 2012

New authors you might want to try:

Washed up by Susan Koefod

1222: a Hanne Wilhelmsen novel by Anne Holt; translated by Marlaine Delargy

Cold cruel winter: a Richard Nottingham mystery by Chris Nickson

All cry chaos: an Henri Poincaré mystery by Leonard Rosen

The crown by Bilyeau, Nancy

Dead End in Norvelt

Dead end in Norvelt by Jack Gantos — justly deserved winning the Newbery. It is an entertaining as well enriching read set in 1962 Norvelt, Pennsylvania — a real place. Indeed, the story is partly autobiographical which is why the main character's name is Jackie Gantos. Jackie is grounded for the summer for doing a couple dumb things. He ends up having to be the "hired hands" for an arthritic elderly neighbor, Miss Volker. As he transcribes the obituaries for the local paper, a sinister pattern begins to emerge — far too many of the town's elderly are dying in rapid succession by bizarre causes. Zany characters and wild escapades are intermixed with fascinating historical facts about not only Norvelt, but renowned figures in world history. By the end of the summer Jackie has made a quantum leap of consciousness on many levels. One realization is that anyone can benefit from studying the past, their own or mankind's. If you remind yourself of the stupid stuff done and the rotten results, you won't want to repeat it. When you can get your hands on it, you will have a memorable, fun, and enlightening reading adventure with this latest work of literary art by Jack Gantos.

Look What's In Large Print January 2012

Diary of a Not-So-Wimpy Kid

Inside out & back again by Thanhha Lai — Do you enjoy reading diaries? Do you like historical fiction? A wonderful adventure is in store for you then. This book justly deserved winning The National Book Award for Young People's Literature, as well as two other awards. Meet Ha, a bright, feisty 10-year-old girl, who must flee her home in Vietnam along with her mother and three older brothers. When they arrive in Florida they must stay at a refugeee camp until a family is found to sponsor them. "Cowboy" and his wife in Alabama agree to do so and yet another chapter begins in a very challenging year for Ha. She faces bullies, prejudice, an unknown language, and a deep longing for her friends, family, and life in Saigon. Not only are Ha's diary entries full of action and adventure that keep you turning pages, but they also introduce you to a cast of characters who are so vividly protrayed, you feel as if you know them. Ha's relationships with her brothers depict typical sibling rivilry, as well as loving unity. Much of what happens to Ha is based on what Lai experienced as a child.

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