History

Nonfiction Picture Books for Women's History Month

March is Women's History Month. To celebrate, try one of these great picture books featuring the true stories of strong, smart women throughout history. 

America's champion swimmer: Gertrude Ederle by written by David A. Adler ; illustrated by Terry Widener
Describes the life and accomplishments of Gertrude Ederle, the first woman to swim the English Channel and a figure in the early women's rights movement

Eleanor quiet no more: the life of Eleanor Roosevelt by written by Doreen Rappaport ; illustrated by Gary Kelley
Explores the life of Eleanor Roosevelt from her upbringing, education, and marriage to Franklin Delano.

Holocaust Remembrance Day: Docu Watch – "Never a Bystander"

Join us in watching this short documentary film titled Never A Bystander, featuring an inspiring Holocaust survivor, Irene Butter, who shows viewers how empowered choices — forgiveness included — enables lives of joy, purpose, and compassion. This film was filmed partially at Discovery Middle school in Canton.  Both the films subject, Irene Butter and the film’s director, Evelyn Neuhaus, will be in attendance for an engaging Q&A. All ages welcome on Wednesday, April 15 from 7:00-8:00 PM.

It Was 50 Years Ago Today ...

To learn about some of the historic events of 1965 check out some of these resources from the Library's collection:

The eve of destruction: how 1965 transformed America by James T. Patterson

1965: the most revolutionary year in music by Andrew Grant Jackson

We were soldiers once— and young: Ia Drang, the battle that changed the war in Vietnam by Harold G. Moore and Joseph L. Galloway

Tomorrow-land: the 1964-65 World's Fair and the transformation of America by Joseph Tirella

Even More Biographies for Women's History Month

Ambition and desire: the dangerous life of Josephine Bonaparte by Kate Williams

 

 

The woman I wanted to be by Diane von Furstenberg

 

 

 

Eleanor of Aquitaine: the mother queen of the Middle Ages by Desmond Seward

 

 

 

The woman who would be king by Kara Cooney

 

 

 

Pioneer girl: the annotated autobiography by Laura Ingalls Wilder ; Pamela Smith Hill, editor

 

 

 

Look What's In Large Print: History

“To me, history ought to be a source of pleasure. It isn't just part of our civic responsibility. To me, it's an enlargement of the experience of being alive, just the way literature or art or music is."

― David McCullough[The Title Always Comes Last; NEH 2003 Jefferson Lecturer interview profile]

Children's Biographies for Women's History Month

In honor of Women's History Month, read the fascinating true stories of some of the many women who have shaped our world.

I am Malala: how one girl stood up for education and changed the world by Malala Yousafzai with Patricia McCormick
Raised in a once-peaceful area of Pakistan transformed by terrorism, Malala was taught to stand up for what she believes. So she fought for her right to be educated. And on October 9, 2012, she nearly lost her life for the cause. --Provided by publisher.

Bon appétit!: the delicious life of Julia Child by Jessie Hartland
Follow Julia Child-chef, author, and television personality-from her childhood in Pasadena, California, to her life as a spy in WWII, to the cooking classes she took in Paris, to publication of Mastering the Art of French Cooking, to the funny moments of being a chef on TV. -- Provided by publisher.

More Biographies for Women's History Month

Children's Nonfiction for Women's History Month

Celebrate by reading one of these stories about how women have changed history.

Girls think of everything: stories of ingenious inventions by women by Catherine Thimmesh ; illustrated by Melissa Sweet
Tells the story of how women throughout the ages have responded to situations confronting them in daily life by inventing such items as correction fluid, space helmets, and disposable diapers.

Women in War

In honor of Women's History Month read about some of the heroic women who have served their country in various ways throughout our history:

Amelia Earhart's daughters: the wild and glorious story of American women aviators from World War II to the dawn of the space age by Leslie Haynsworth and David Toomey

American women in World War I: they also served by Lettie Gavin

Cast no shadows: the life of the American spy who changed the course of World War II by Mary S. Lovell

Florence Nightingale: the making of an icon by Mark Bostridge

Selma to Montgomery, March 7-25, 1965

Three marches in 1965, from  Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, were part of the Selma Voting Rights Movement and led to the passage that year of the Voting Rights Act, considered a landmark federal achievement of the Civil Rights Movement.

Across that bridge: life lessons and a vision for change by John Lewis ; with Brenda Jones

Controversy and hope: the civil rights photographs of James Karales by Julian Cox with Rebekah Jacob and Monica Karales ; foreword by Andrew Young

Eyes on the prize: America's civil rights years, 1954- 1965 by Juan Williams, with the Eyes on the prize production team ; introduction by Julian Bond

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