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Edward Gorey: Writer Artist

Fans of PBS Mystery! are familiar with the work of Edward Gorey (1925-2000) born 88 years ago today in Chicago.  His eerie illustrations have introduced Mystery!  since 1980.  Gorey wrote and/or illustrated over 70 books, his images reminiscent of Victorian or Edwardian times with a macabre twist are instantly recognized.

Dateline 1863!

The year 1863 was a particularly memorable one in both American and world history. It was 150 years ago that the world's first underground railroad opened in London; the dome of the United States Capitol was finished; the National Academy of Sciences was created; both Arizona Territory and Idaho Territory were created; West Virginia was admitted to the Union; Jules Verne published Five Weeks in a Ballon; and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow first published the poem Paul Revere's Ride. It was also the midpoint of the Civil War. Read about some of the other memorable events of that year below:

Presidents Day

Instead of going to the mall for the Presidents Day sale, you can really celebrate by brushing up on some presidential history. A great place to start is the Internet Public Library's POTUS which provides biographical information, historical documents, and audio and video files. If this doesn't satisfy your historical sweet tooth, check out Public Papers of the Presidents at the American Presidency Project which has digitized over 85,000 documents related to the Presidency, including audio and video. Still not enough? The Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections contains detailed national results of all U.S. presidential elections since 1789.

Women Who Changed America

In celebration of Women's History Month, we are pleased to host two luminaries from our past:  former first lady Mary Todd Lincoln and famous author Beatrix Potter.  Re-enactor Marie Papciak will bring these two famous women to life in her presentation.  With over 30 years of experience, Ms. Papciak will bring the characters to life to the delight of children and adults alike on Saturday, March 16 at 2:00 PM.  No registration is required.  

Richard III Remains Found

The remains of Richard III, King of England 1483-1485 have been found under a parking The earliest surviving portrait of Richard (c. 1520, after a lost original), formerly belonging to the Paston family.lot in Leicester, UK.  They have been positively identified by comparing DNA with two descendents of Richard's sister.  The remains have been missing for over 500 years.  Following the Battle of Bosworth Field where Richard III was killed, his remains were unceremoniously dumped without a marker.  (Image: The earliest surviving portrait of Richard (c.

Author Talks at Nicola's Books

Detroit: an American autopsy by Charlie LeDuff.  Mr. LeDuff, a FOX2 television journalist, will discuss his book at Nicola's Books in Ann Arbor on Thursday, February 14 at 7:00PM.





Rosa Parks' 100th Birthday

Civil rights activist Rosa Parks was born on February 4, 1913 in Tuskegee, Alabama. On December 1, 1955 she refused to obey a bus driver's order to give up her seat  to a white passenger, setting off the Montgomery Bus Boycott. This became one of the defining moments of the Civil Rights Movement leading to nationwide efforts to end segregation of public facilities. She eventually moved to Detroit where she lived until her death in 2005.

Rosa Parks: my story by Rosa Parks with Jim Haskins


Rosa Parks by Douglas Brinkley


Quiet strength: the faith, the hope, and the heart of a woman who changed a nation by reflections by Rosa Parks with Gregory J. Reed

African American History

The month of February has been set aside to celebrate the contributions of the country's African Americans. It was in 1926 that  Negro History Week was first organized by historian Dr. Carter G. Woodson (1875-1950) and others. During America's Bicentennial celebration in 1976, the one-week span was lengthened to four and February was established as Black History Month.  The Canton Public Library has a vast amount of resources for and about African Americans.

Books: Reference

Vietnam War Peace Agreement Anniversary

Forty years ago, on Januuary 27, 1973 the Paris Peace Accords were signed - ending the Vietnam War. During the long conflict, the United States suffered over 58,000 soldiers killed and approximately 153, 000 wounded, as well as 1,943 missing in action.

A bright shining lie: John Paul Vann and America in Vietnam by Neil Sheehan


Ending the Vietnam War: a history of America's involvement in and extrication from the Vietnam War by Henry Kissinger

Gold!

165 years ago, on January 24, 1848, gold was discovered at Sutter's Mill setting off the California Gold Rush. People began flocking to the state later that year, but the majority didn't arrive until the next year — hence the term "forty-niners." All told, the news drew some 300,000 people from all over the world (Latin America, Europe, Australia and China) between the years 1849 and 1855, to seek their fortune in California.

The age of gold: the California Gold Rush and the new American dream by H.W. Brands

The California Gold Rush and the coming of the Civil War by Leonard L. Richards

Days of gold: the California Gold Rush and the American nation by Malcolm J. Rohrbough

Roaring camp: the social world of the California Gold Rush by Susan Lee Johnson

Black History Month Storyteller

Join noted storyteller Alfreda Harris as she dazzles us with stories about Martin Luther King, Jr and the Walk to Freedom exhibit on loan to the library from the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. Visit the exhibit, located near the main Information Desk, then listen as Ms. Harris takes us on a journey in celebration of the Civil Rights movement. Suitable for tween, teens and adults on Tuesday, February 26 at 7:00 PM.

Coming of Age in America

The reality of our planet is we are an aging society. Soon over half the global population will be over the age of 50. This is unprecedented in human history. What will this mean to society? A new PBS documentary is in the works, Coming of Age in America. It will look at where we live, how we work, and what impact will this have on the world. Watch your local PBS station for broadcast times.

Celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr.

On loan from the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History is the Martin Luther King, Jr. exhibit entitled "Walk to Freedom." You can visit this exhibit, highlighting Dr. King's march down Woodward Avenue to Cobo Hall on Sunday, June 23, 1963, at Canton Public Library through the end of February. It was a nonviolent march supported by the Detroit Council of Human Rights, the NAACP, the UAW and many more. This famous "Walk to Freedom" was a 'dress rehearsal' for the famous March on Washington and Dr. King's I Have a Dream speech. Also be sure to check out the lovely, informative showcases in the library as we celebrate Dr. King and Black History Month.

Dear Rosa Parks

Join us Thursday, February 7 at 7:00 PM as we celebrate Black History Month and the 100th anniversary of Rosa Parks' birth with speaker Gregory J. Reed, Esq.  Mr. Reed, an attorney, author and advocate, has helped preserve and tell the Rosa Parks story, as well as garner proper recognition for Ms. Parks' acts as a true hero of the equality movement.  He has a special tale to tell of advocating on her behalf to get her proper recognition via the Medal of Freedom and the new postage stamp being issued in her honor this month.  Mr. Reed will sign copies of his book, Quiet Strength: the Faith, the Hope and the Heart of a Woman Who Changed a Nation. 

The Battle of New Orleans

On January 8, 1815, during the War of 1812, British forces suffered more than 2,000 casualties in their attack on New Orleans. The defending U.S. forces were led by General Andrew Jackson who became a national hero as a result. Ironically, neither side knew that the war had already ended two weeks before with the signing of the Treaty of Ghent.

The Battle of New Orleans by Robert V. Remini

Emancipation Proclamation 150th Anniversary

President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863. It declared "that all persons held as slaves" within the rebellious states "are, and henceforward shall be free." Every advance of Union troops into the Confederacy expanded former slaves' freedom. Additionally, the Proclamation allowed black men into the military, and by the end of the Civil War almost 200,000 black soldiers and sailors had joined and fought for the Union cause.

Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation: the end of slavery in America by Allen C. Guelzo

Abraham Lincoln and the road to emancipation, 1861-1865 by William K. Klingaman

Douglass and Lincoln: how a revolutionary black leader and a reluctant liberator struggled to end slavery and save the Union by Paul Kendrick and Stephen Kendrick

The fiery trial: Abraham Lincoln and American slavery by Eric Foner

Canton Seniors Book Group January 24, 2013

Canton Seniors Book Group meets on Thursday, January 24 at 2:00-3:00 PM in Canton Public Library's Group Study Room A. Copies of this month's book will be available after December 27. We will be discussing:

Sarah's Key by Tatiana de Rosnay