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Women in Science & Technology

The 2013 theme for National Women's History Month is "Women Inspiring Through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics." In that spirt, check out some of the following titles acknowledging the tremendous contributions of women to science and technology throughout history:

Jocelyn Elders, M.D.: from sharecropper's daughter to surgeon general of the United States of America by Joycelyn Elders and David Chanoff — Jocelyn Elders, pediatrician, public health administrator & the first woman Surgeon General of the United States


Beautiful: the life of Hedy Lamarr by Stephen Michael Shearer — Hedy Lamarr, actress, scientist, inventor & mathematician


Miss Leavitt's stars: the untold story of the woman who discovered how to measure the universe by George Johnson — Henrietta Swan Leavitt, groundbreaking American astronomer

Woman Suffrage Parade of 1913

This year is the 100th anniversary of the Woman Suffrage Parade organized by the suffragist Alice Paul. On March 3, 1913 more than 5,000 participants - including such notables as Helen Keller - marched down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C. in support of granting women the right to vote. However, it wasn't until August 26, 1920, with the passage of the 19th Amendment, that American women finally attained that goal.

25 Extraordinary Women from Past & Present

Celebrate Women's History Month by reading about one of the fascinating women below.

Madam Secretary by Madeleine Albright, with Bill Woodward — Madeleine Albright, Ambassador, first woman to become United States Secretary of State


Arbella: England's lost queen by Sarah Gristwood — Arbella, English Renaissance noblewoman

Native American Dancers for Mother Earth

Celebrate Mother Earth with authentic Native American Dancers led by Reg Pettibone. To wrap up our week-long Earth Week activities, we welcome the Native American Dancers who will entertain us in a very special way on Saturday, April 27 at 2:00 PM. Everyone is welcome to see the beautiful, colorful costumes and the outstanding dance moves that praise our planet.

Edward Gorey: Writer Artist

Fans of PBS Mystery! are familiar with the work of Edward Gorey (1925-2000) born 88 years ago today in Chicago.  His eerie illustrations have introduced Mystery!  since 1980.  Gorey wrote and/or illustrated over 70 books, his images reminiscent of Victorian or Edwardian times with a macabre twist are instantly recognized.

Dateline 1863!

The year 1863 was a particularly memorable one in both American and world history. It was 150 years ago that the world's first underground railroad opened in London; the dome of the United States Capitol was finished; the National Academy of Sciences was created; both Arizona Territory and Idaho Territory were created; West Virginia was admitted to the Union; Jules Verne published Five Weeks in a Ballon; and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow first published the poem Paul Revere's Ride. It was also the midpoint of the Civil War. Read about some of the other memorable events of that year below:

Presidents Day

Instead of going to the mall for the Presidents Day sale, you can really celebrate by brushing up on some presidential history. A great place to start is the Internet Public Library's POTUS which provides biographical information, historical documents, and audio and video files. If this doesn't satisfy your historical sweet tooth, check out Public Papers of the Presidents at the American Presidency Project which has digitized over 85,000 documents related to the Presidency, including audio and video. Still not enough? The Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections contains detailed national results of all U.S. presidential elections since 1789.

Women Who Changed America

In celebration of Women's History Month, we are pleased to host two luminaries from our past:  former first lady Mary Todd Lincoln and famous author Beatrix Potter.  Re-enactor Marie Papciak will bring these two famous women to life in her presentation.  With over 30 years of experience, Ms. Papciak will bring the characters to life to the delight of children and adults alike on Saturday, March 16 at 2:00 PM.  No registration is required.  

Richard III Remains Found

The remains of Richard III, King of England 1483-1485 have been found under a parking The earliest surviving portrait of Richard (c. 1520, after a lost original), formerly belonging to the Paston family.lot in Leicester, UK.  They have been positively identified by comparing DNA with two descendents of Richard's sister.  The remains have been missing for over 500 years.  Following the Battle of Bosworth Field where Richard III was killed, his remains were unceremoniously dumped without a marker.  (Image: The earliest surviving portrait of Richard (c.

Author Talks at Nicola's Books

Detroit: an American autopsy by Charlie LeDuff.  Mr. LeDuff, a FOX2 television journalist, will discuss his book at Nicola's Books in Ann Arbor on Thursday, February 14 at 7:00PM.





Rosa Parks' 100th Birthday

Civil rights activist Rosa Parks was born on February 4, 1913 in Tuskegee, Alabama. On December 1, 1955 she refused to obey a bus driver's order to give up her seat  to a white passenger, setting off the Montgomery Bus Boycott. This became one of the defining moments of the Civil Rights Movement leading to nationwide efforts to end segregation of public facilities. She eventually moved to Detroit where she lived until her death in 2005.

Rosa Parks: my story by Rosa Parks with Jim Haskins


Rosa Parks by Douglas Brinkley


Quiet strength: the faith, the hope, and the heart of a woman who changed a nation by reflections by Rosa Parks with Gregory J. Reed

African American History

The month of February has been set aside to celebrate the contributions of the country's African Americans. It was in 1926 that  Negro History Week was first organized by historian Dr. Carter G. Woodson (1875-1950) and others. During America's Bicentennial celebration in 1976, the one-week span was lengthened to four and February was established as Black History Month.  The Canton Public Library has a vast amount of resources for and about African Americans.

Books: Reference

Vietnam War Peace Agreement Anniversary

Forty years ago, on Januuary 27, 1973 the Paris Peace Accords were signed - ending the Vietnam War. During the long conflict, the United States suffered over 58,000 soldiers killed and approximately 153, 000 wounded, as well as 1,943 missing in action.

A bright shining lie: John Paul Vann and America in Vietnam by Neil Sheehan


Ending the Vietnam War: a history of America's involvement in and extrication from the Vietnam War by Henry Kissinger

Gold!

165 years ago, on January 24, 1848, gold was discovered at Sutter's Mill setting off the California Gold Rush. People began flocking to the state later that year, but the majority didn't arrive until the next year — hence the term "forty-niners." All told, the news drew some 300,000 people from all over the world (Latin America, Europe, Australia and China) between the years 1849 and 1855, to seek their fortune in California.

The age of gold: the California Gold Rush and the new American dream by H.W. Brands

The California Gold Rush and the coming of the Civil War by Leonard L. Richards

Days of gold: the California Gold Rush and the American nation by Malcolm J. Rohrbough

Roaring camp: the social world of the California Gold Rush by Susan Lee Johnson

Black History Month Storyteller

Join noted storyteller Alfreda Harris as she dazzles us with stories about Martin Luther King, Jr and the Walk to Freedom exhibit on loan to the library from the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. Visit the exhibit, located near the main Information Desk, then listen as Ms. Harris takes us on a journey in celebration of the Civil Rights movement. Suitable for tween, teens and adults on Tuesday, February 26 at 7:00 PM.