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Our Own Snug Fireside: Life during the Civil War

Join us on Saturday, November 16 from 2:00-3:00 PM for a peek into the world which no one alive today has witnessed first-hand. As living historians renowned for their knowledge on daily life of the mid-19th century, Larissa Fleishman and Ken Giorlando will draw you into their world of horses & carriages, oil lamps & candles, and hoop skirts & top hats as they bring back the everyday life of long ago.

"Our Own Snug Fireside” is a program for audiences of all ages which offers a first-hand look into the activities, chores, occupations, manners, etiquette, and clothing of a time from over one hundred and fifty years ago. Using replica artifacts, entertaining exchanges, fun filled facts, and a bit of humor our presenters will show what life was like during such an intense time in American History: The Civil War.

Mrs. Fleishman and Mr. Giorlando have been students of history for decades, and not only have intently studied the everyday life of our ancestors, but have also been involved in the practice of historical presenting and living history/reenacting for nearly as long. “Our Own Snug Fireside” is certainly a chance to see history come alive.

[Tatton Park Sept 201027 by DeviousWolf Photography is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0]

Who Killed JFK?

It has been 50 years since our 35th president John F. Kennedy was assassinated on November 22, 1963 in the Dealey Plaza in Dallas, Texas. The FBI and the Warren Commission concluded that Kennedy was killed by a lone gunman, Lee Harvey Oswald. In 1978, however, the US House Select Committee on Assassinations felt Kennedy's assassination was the result of a conspiracy. Today, 80% of Americans believe the FBI and Warren Commission investigations were flawed. Hear the rest of the story from former Department of Defense employee and Canton resident, Gerald Dodson. Join us on November 14 at 7:00 PM as we remember this tragic event in our history.

Lincoln: The Movie

We are honoring the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address with an amazing Civil War traveling exhibit and a special showing of Lincoln. Directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Academy Award winner Daniel Day Lewis, this profoundly thought-provoking movie focuses on Lincoln's final months in office as he struggles to end the war, emancipate the slaves and reunite our country. Four score and seven years ago... please join us on November 20 at 6:00 PM to share this movie and a few snacks with friends and neighbors.

Cuban Missile Crisis Anniversary

Last year marked the 50th anniversary of one of the most pivotal moments of the Cold War. For 13 days in October 1962, the United States and the former Soviet Union engaged in a political and military standoff over the installation of nuclear-armed Soviet missiles in Cuba — just 90 miles off the U.S. coast. President John F. Kennedy notified the country about the presence of the missiles in an historic television address on October 22, 1962. It was during this speech that he explained his decision to enact a naval blockade around Cuba. Because of this many, people believed the world was on the brink of nuclear war. Disaster was averted, however when Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev agreed to remove the missiles in exchange for the U.S. not invading Cuba, and also removing U.S. missiles from Turkey. The confrontation was officially ended on October 28, 1962.

Maximum danger: Kennedy, the missiles, and the crisis of American confidence by Robert Weisbrot

One minute to midnight: Kennedy, Khrushchev, and Castro on the brink of nuclear war by Michael Dobbs

Exploring America

In the spirit of Columbus Day read about some of the other explorers who ventured out in search of new worlds:

Amerigo: the man who gave his name to America by Felipe Fernández-Armesto

Henry Hudson: dreams and obsession by Corey Sandler

La Salle: a perilous odyssey from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico by Donald S. Johnson

Over the edge of the world: Magellan's terrifying circumnavigation of the globe by Laurence Bergreen

Champlain's dream by David Hackett Fischer

Hernando de Soto: a savage quest in the Americas by David Ewing Duncan

October Birthdays

Read about some of the fascinating people who were born in the month of October!

Home: a memoir of my early years by Julie Andrews — October 1

The life of Graham Greene by Norman Sherry — October 2

Buster Keaton: cut to the chase by Marion Meade — October 4

Chester Alan Arthur by Zachary Karabell — October 5

Rocket man: Robert H. Goddard and the birth of the space age by David A. Clary — October 5

This little light of mine: the life of Fannie Lou Hamer by Kay Mills — October 6

Rabble-rouser for peace: the authorized biography of Desmond Tutu by John Allen — October 7

School Days

Now that school has begun for another year, this would be a good time to learn about some extraordinary teachers both past and present:

A schoolteacher in old Alaska: the story of Hannah Breece by edited and with an introduction and commentary by Jane Jacobs

Nothing daunted: the unexpected education of two society girls in the West by Dorothy Wickenden

The water is wide by Pat Conroy

Teacher man: a memoir by Frank McCourt

Beyond the miracle worker: the remarkable life of Anne Sullivan Macy and her extraordinary friendship with Helen Keller by Kim E. Nielsen

In the sun's house: my year teaching on the Navajo reservation by Kurt Caswell ; afterword by Rex Lee Jim

The March on Washington, 1963

The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom took place in Washington, D.C. on August 28, 1963. One of the largest political rallies for human rights in U.S. history, it was the site of Martin Luther King's historic I Have a Dream speech. In a year marked by racial unrest and numerous civil rights demonstations, Dr. King pleaded to "let freedom ring."

Nobody turn me around: a people's history of the 1963 march on Washington by Charles Euchner

Behind the dream: the making of the speech that transformed a nation by Clarence B. Jones and Stuart Connelly

The dream: Martin Luther King, Jr., and the speech that inspired a nation by Drew D. Hansen

The 1963 civil rights march by Scott Ingram

Doctors and Nurses in War

The new book Surgeon in Blue is the biography of Jonathan Letterman, the Civil War surgeon who, as chief medical officer for the Army of the Potomac, revolutionized combat medicine during four major battles of the war. Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg resulted in an unprecedented number of casualties, and his innovations saved countless lives. Among them was the first organized ambulance corps, and the establishment of hygiene and dietary standards. Learn about other brave doctors, nurses, and medics whose bravery and medical care saved lives while risking their own.

Revolutionary medicine, 1700-1800 by C. Keith Wilbur

Medics at war: military medicine from colonial times to the 21st century by John T. Greenwood, F. Clifton Berry Jr

Islamic Presentation

mosqueCome join us as Dr. Palmer and Dr. Siddiqui talk about Islam and its history on Thursday September 19 at 7 PM. Dr. Siddiqui is a PhD candidate in Islamic Studies at the University of Michigan and Dr. Palmer is a medical doctor in our community. They will be available afterward for questions and comments.

Davy Crockett

Davy Crockett was born on August 17, 1786. While he is probably best known for having perished at the Battle of the Alamo in San Antonio, Texas in 1836, he also served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1827 to 1831, representing the 9th district of Tennessee.

Born on a mountaintop: on the road with Davy Crockett and the ghosts of the wild frontier by Bob Thompson

David Crockett: the Lion of the West by Michael Wallis

Davy Crockett [videodisc] by A & E Television Network

The Alamo: an illustrated history by Edwin P. Hoyt

The blood of heroes: the 13-day struggle for the Alamo— and the sacrifice that forged a nation by James Donovan