History

Also available in: audiobook | large print

On May 1, 1915, with WWI entering its tenth month, a luxury ocean liner sailed out of New York, bound for Liverpool, carrying a record number of children and infants. The passengers were surprisingly at ease, even though Germany had declared the seas around Britain to be a war zone. For months, German U-boats had brought terror to the North Atlantic. But the Lusitania was one of the era's great transatlantic "Greyhounds"--the fastest liner then in service--and her captain, William Thomas Turner, placed tremendous faith in the gentlemanly strictures of warfare that for a century had kept civilian ships safe from attack. Germany, however, was determined to change the rules of the game. Join us on Saturday, February 20 at 10:00 AM.

Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr.

Today we honor the life of Martin Luther King Jr., the civil rights leader who would have turned 84 this year. A federal holiday to honor King, who was assassinated in April 1968, was first observed in 1986. Congress also designated it a national day of service in 1994.

Books

April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King Jr.'s death and transformation of America by Michael Eric Dyson

At Canaan's edge: America in the King years 1965-68 by Taylor Branch

The autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr. by edited by Clayborne Carson

2015 Non-Fiction Librarians' Picks

This year three of the picks were nominated by more than one librarian: Erik Larson's DEAD WAKE, Amy Poehler's YES PLEASE, and Jennifer Lawson's FURIOUSLY HAPPY.

From the #1 New York Times bestselling author and master of narrative nonfiction comes the enthralling story of the sinking of the Lusitania On May 1, 1915, with WWI entering its tenth month, a luxury ocean liner as richly appointed as an English country house sailed out of New York, bound for Liverpool, carrying a record number of children and infants. The passengers were surprisingly at ease, even though Germany had declared the seas around Britain to be a war zone. For months, German U-boats had brought terror to the North Atlantic. But the Lusitania was one of the era's great transatlantic "Greyhounds"--the fastest liner then in service--and her captain, William Thomas Turner, placed tremendous faith in the gentlemanly strictures of warfare that for a century had kept civilian ships safe from attack. Germany, however, was determined to change the rules of the game, and Walther Schwieger, the captain of Unterseeboot -20, was happy to oblige. 

Examines the pervasive fears and myths surrounding vaccines from a mother's perspective and identifies the historical and cultural factors that cause people to doubt government regulations and the medical establishment.

On August 16, 1824, an elderly French gentlemen sailed into New York Harbor and giddy Americans were there to welcome him. Or, rather, to welcome him back. It had been 30 years since the Revolutionary War hero the Marquis de Lafayette had last set foot in the United States, and he was so beloved that 80,000 people showed up to cheer for him. The entire population of New York at the time was 120,000. Lafayette's arrival in 1824 coincided with one of the most contentious presidential elections in American history. Congress had just fought its first epic battle over slavery, and the threat of a Civil War loomed. But Lafayette, belonging to neither North nor South, to no political party or faction, was a walking, talking reminder of the sacrifices and bravery of the revolutionary generation and what they wanted the country to be. His return was not just a reunion with his beloved Americans, it was a reunion for Americans with their own astonishing singular past. .

Pearl Harbor Remembered

Today marks the 74th anniversary of the surprise attack on Hawaii's Pearl Harbor by the Imperial Japanese Navy. The early morning attack on December 7, 1941 on the U.S. fleet stationed in the harbor, and at Hickam Field where 51 airplanes were on the ground, was the catalyst for the United States' entry into World War II. Nine ships were sunk and twenty-one were severely damaged and nearly half of the airplanes were destroyed or severely damaged. The death toll numbered 2,403 - 1,177 from the battleship Arizona alone.

What We're Watching: December 2015

Don't miss these documentaries.

Good hair [videodisc] by Chris Rock Entertainment [and] HBO Films

Mighty uke [videodisc]: the amazing comeback of a musical underdog by a Tiny Goat film ; written, directed, produced & edited by Tony Coleman & Margaret Meagher

Lights out! [videodisc] by CBC ; written and directed by Michael McNamara ; produced by Judy Holm and Michael McNamara

Route 66 [videodisc]: the ultimate road trip by Greene HD Productions

Wagonmasters [videodisc] by directed by Sam Smartt and Chris Zaluski

Edmund Fitzgerald 40th Anniversary

November 10 marks the 40th anniversary of the sinking of the iron ore carrier Edmund Fitzgerald. The ship sank in Lake Superior in 1975 killing its crew of 29. The date will be commemorated by several events around the state including those at the Michigan Maritime Museum in South Haven, and at the Great Lakes Shipwreck Gallery in Whitefish Point.

The wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald by Frederick Stonehouse

Mighty Fitz: the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald by Michael Schumacher

Gales of November: the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald by Robert J. Hemming

What We're Reading: November 2015

Star Trek fans will want to read The Autobiography of James T. Kirk...  Highly recommend Dissent...it is both a reassuring and disconcerting look at our political history.   A. D. Scott weaves a mystery throughout this novel about of a small Scottish Highland village in 1956.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - History