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African American History

The month of February has been set aside to celebrate the contributions of the country's African Americans. It was in 1926 that  Negro History Week was first organized by historian Dr. Carter G. Woodson (1875-1950) and others. During America's Bicentennial celebration in 1976, the one-week span was lengthened to four and February was established as Black History Month.  The Canton Public Library has a vast amount of resources for and about African Americans.

Books: Reference

Vietnam War Peace Agreement Anniversary

Forty years ago, on Januuary 27, 1973 the Paris Peace Accords were signed - ending the Vietnam War. During the long conflict, the United States suffered over 58,000 soldiers killed and approximately 153, 000 wounded, as well as 1,943 missing in action.

A bright shining lie: John Paul Vann and America in Vietnam by Neil Sheehan


Ending the Vietnam War: a history of America's involvement in and extrication from the Vietnam War by Henry Kissinger

Gold!

165 years ago, on January 24, 1848, gold was discovered at Sutter's Mill setting off the California Gold Rush. People began flocking to the state later that year, but the majority didn't arrive until the next year — hence the term "forty-niners." All told, the news drew some 300,000 people from all over the world (Latin America, Europe, Australia and China) between the years 1849 and 1855, to seek their fortune in California.

The age of gold: the California Gold Rush and the new American dream by H.W. Brands

The California Gold Rush and the coming of the Civil War by Leonard L. Richards

Days of gold: the California Gold Rush and the American nation by Malcolm J. Rohrbough

Roaring camp: the social world of the California Gold Rush by Susan Lee Johnson

Black History Month Storyteller

Join noted storyteller Alfreda Harris as she dazzles us with stories about Martin Luther King, Jr and the Walk to Freedom exhibit on loan to the library from the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. Visit the exhibit, located near the main Information Desk, then listen as Ms. Harris takes us on a journey in celebration of the Civil Rights movement. Suitable for tween, teens and adults on Tuesday, February 26 at 7:00 PM.

Coming of Age in America

The reality of our planet is we are an aging society. Soon over half the global population will be over the age of 50. This is unprecedented in human history. What will this mean to society? A new PBS documentary is in the works, Coming of Age in America. It will look at where we live, how we work, and what impact will this have on the world. Watch your local PBS station for broadcast times.

Celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr.

On loan from the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History is the Martin Luther King, Jr. exhibit entitled "Walk to Freedom." You can visit this exhibit, highlighting Dr. King's march down Woodward Avenue to Cobo Hall on Sunday, June 23, 1963, at Canton Public Library through the end of February. It was a nonviolent march supported by the Detroit Council of Human Rights, the NAACP, the UAW and many more. This famous "Walk to Freedom" was a 'dress rehearsal' for the famous March on Washington and Dr. King's I Have a Dream speech. Also be sure to check out the lovely, informative showcases in the library as we celebrate Dr. King and Black History Month.

Dear Rosa Parks

Join us Thursday, February 7 at 7:00 PM as we celebrate Black History Month and the 100th anniversary of Rosa Parks' birth with speaker Gregory J. Reed, Esq.  Mr. Reed, an attorney, author and advocate, has helped preserve and tell the Rosa Parks story, as well as garner proper recognition for Ms. Parks' acts as a true hero of the equality movement.  He has a special tale to tell of advocating on her behalf to get her proper recognition via the Medal of Freedom and the new postage stamp being issued in her honor this month.  Mr. Reed will sign copies of his book, Quiet Strength: the Faith, the Hope and the Heart of a Woman Who Changed a Nation. 

The Battle of New Orleans

On January 8, 1815, during the War of 1812, British forces suffered more than 2,000 casualties in their attack on New Orleans. The defending U.S. forces were led by General Andrew Jackson who became a national hero as a result. Ironically, neither side knew that the war had already ended two weeks before with the signing of the Treaty of Ghent.

The Battle of New Orleans by Robert V. Remini

Emancipation Proclamation 150th Anniversary

President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863. It declared "that all persons held as slaves" within the rebellious states "are, and henceforward shall be free." Every advance of Union troops into the Confederacy expanded former slaves' freedom. Additionally, the Proclamation allowed black men into the military, and by the end of the Civil War almost 200,000 black soldiers and sailors had joined and fought for the Union cause.

Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation: the end of slavery in America by Allen C. Guelzo

Abraham Lincoln and the road to emancipation, 1861-1865 by William K. Klingaman

Douglass and Lincoln: how a revolutionary black leader and a reluctant liberator struggled to end slavery and save the Union by Paul Kendrick and Stephen Kendrick

The fiery trial: Abraham Lincoln and American slavery by Eric Foner

Canton Seniors Book Group January 24, 2013

Canton Seniors Book Group meets on Thursday, January 24 at 2:00-3:00 PM in Canton Public Library's Group Study Room A. Copies of this month's book will be available after December 27. We will be discussing:

Sarah's Key by Tatiana de Rosnay

Year 2012 Top Non-Fiction Books Picks

Our favorite reads this year from the Adult and Children/Tweens/Teens Librarians:

Behind the beautiful forevers by Katherine Boo

We've got a job: the 1963 Birmingham Children's March by Cynthia Levinson

The righteous mind: why good people are divided by politics and religion by Jonathan Haidt

Quiet: the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking by Susan Cain

Paris: a love story: a memoir by Kati Marton

Mortality by Christopher Hitchens ; foreword by Graydon Carter ; afterword by Carol Blue

I Spy

The recent film Argo  starring Ben Affleck tells the true but improbable story of a covert operation to save six Americans hiding in the Canadian Embassy during the 1979 Iran Hostage Crisis. The history of espionage is filled with many such hard to believe tales and the Library's collection has many great titles to pick from.

Double cross: the true story of the D-day spies by Ben Macintyre — What did a Polish patriot, a Peruvian party girl, a Serbian playboy, an eccentric Spanish chicken farmer, and a volatile dog-loving Frenchwoman have in common?

History at the Movies

This year has seen several new films based or inspired on historical figures and events. Lincoln, Hitchcock, On the Road, Argo, and Hyde Park on Hudson are all either in theatres now — or soon will be. If you want to be an educated viewer try one of the titles below:

Team of rivals: the political genius of Abraham Lincoln by Doris Kearns Goodwin

Rise to greatness: Abraham Lincoln and America's most perilous year by David Von Drehle

Great Reads for History Buffs

Armchair historians can't go wrong with this diverse list of recently published biographies and histories:

Thomas Jefferson: the art of power by Jon Meacham

The man who saved the union: Ulysses Grant in war and peace by H.W. Brands

The passage of power by Robert A. Caro

MLK, Jr Movie Marathon

Please join us on Monday, January 21st as we celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. King changed all of our lives during the 1960's civil rights movement. Share stories of his life with the following films:
  • 12:00 Noon — Man of Peace in a Time of War
  • 1:15 PM — King: Go Beyond the Dream to Discover the Man
  • 3:00 PM — In Remembrance of Martin

Helen Milliken Former Michigan First Lady Dies

Former First Lady of Michigan, Helen Wallbank Milliken died today. Wife of Michigan's longest-serving governor, William Milliken, Helen Milliken was a strong advocate of women's rights and environmental issues. In a 2006 interview by the Associated Press she said, "Nobody ever saw anybody burn a bra; they're too expensive, but the myth has survived. There have been excesses, but the goal has always remained the same: equal opportunity for women." Ms. Milliken is survived by her husband, William and son, William, Jr.

What We're Reading November 2012

Thanksgiving Day kicks off a month of celebrations. May we suggest a movie, tips from Martha Stewart on Thanksgiving prepartions, a history, music to sooth, and a story about family.

Planes, trains and automobiles [videodisc] by Paramount Pictures

Martha's classic Thanksgiving [videodisc] by [presented by] Marth Stewart Living Omnimedia

Mayflower: a story of courage, community, and war by Nathaniel Philbrick

Thanksgiving [sound recording]: a Windham Hill collection

Thanksgiving night: a novel by Richard Bausch

Lincolnmania!

Steven Spielberg's highly anticipated new film Lincoln opens on November 9. Starring Daniel Day-Lewis as our 16th president, and Sally Field as Mary Todd Lincoln, it is inspired by Doris Kearns Goodwin's 2005 book Team of Rivals: the political genius of Abraham Lincoln. The film focuses on Lincoln's final few months in office, specifically his tireless efforts to get the 13th Amendment to the Constitution (abolishing slavery) passed.

An Evening with Charles Dickens

Mark Dawidziak presents his one man show featuring selections from various Dickens works including The Story of Paul from "Dombey and Son", The Ghost of Christmas Present from "A Christmas Carol," the Period from "A Tale of Two Cities" and a delightfully macabre bedtime story, Captain Murder from "An Uncommercial Traveler."

Step back in time as we begin the holiday season on a very entertaining note on Thursday, December 13th at 7:00 PM.