History

 

While celebrating St. Patrick's Day let us remember the history and contributions of not only the Irish, but of all of the immigrants who have made this country great -  both in the past and in the present.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution. The Revolution was actually comprised of two uprisings - one in March, the other in November -  that occurred in 1917, dismantling the autocracy of the Romanov tsars,  and leading to the eventual rise of the Soviet Union.

A masterful telling of the outbreak of the Russian Revolution through eye-witness accounts left by foreign nationals who saw the drama unfold.

The tumultuous life of Mohamoud 'Tarzan' Nur--an impoverished nomad who was abandoned in a state orphanage in newly independent Somalia, and became a street brawler and activist. When the country collapsed into civil war and anarchy, Tarzan and his young family became part of an exodus, eventually spending twenty years in north London. But in 2010 Tarzan returned, as mayor, to the unrecognizable ruins of a city now almost entirely controlled by the Islamist militants of Al Shabab.

March is Women's History Month. Find out about the many brave and talented  women who have influenced world history by reading some of these titles from the Library's collection:

Presents profiles of war heroines from Germany, Poland, France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, Great Britain, and the United States.

This unique culinary history of America offers a fascinating look at our past and uses long-forgotten recipes to explain how eight flavors changed how we eat. The United States boasts a culturally and ethnically diverse population which makes for a continually changing culinary landscape. But a young historical gastronomist named Sarah Lohman discovered that American food is united by eight flavors: black pepper, vanilla, curry powder, chili powder, soy sauce, garlic, MSG, and Sriracha. In Eight Flavors , Lohman sets out to explore how these influential ingredients made their way to the American table. 

The things we keep by Sally Hepworth

Anna Forster, in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease at only thirty-eight years old, knows that her family is doing what they believe to be best when they take her to Rosalind House, an assisted living facility. She also knows there's just one another resident her age, Luke. What she does not expect is the love that blossoms between her and Luke even as she resists her new life at Rosalind House. As her disease steals more and more of her memory, Anna fights to hold on to what she knows, including her relationship with Luke. When Eve Bennett is suddenly thrust into the role of single mother she finds herself putting her culinary training to use at Rosalind house. When she meets Anna and Luke she is moved by the bond the pair has forged. But when a tragic incident leads Anna's and Luke's families to separate them, Eve finds herself questioning what she is willing to risk to help them.

this is an endlessly fascinating look at American regionalism and the eleven "nations" that continue to shape North America According to award-winning journalist and historian Colin Woodard, North America is made up of eleven distinct nations, each with its own unique historical roots. In American Nations he takes readers on a journey through the history of our fractured continent, offering a revolutionary and revelatory take on American identity, and how the conflicts between them have shaped our past and continue to mold our future. 

Women's History Month is a good time to remember the long fought battles that have been waged - and are still being waged -  for equal rights for women all over the world..

Documents the 72-year struggle for women's suffrage which culminated in the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920. It illuminates the alliances, infighting, betrayals and defeats that paved the way for victory in the battle for women's right to vote. Historical footage is enhanced with vocal performances, and interviews with historians provide the viewer with both current and historical perspectives.

Historian Lori D. Ginzberg relates the life of a woman of great charm, enormous appetite, and extraordinary intellectual gifts who turned the limitations placed on women like herself into a universal philosophy of equal rights..

Did you know that the 19th Amendment, which granted American women the right to vote, wasn't passed until 1920? Read about the journey to women's suffrage in one of the following titles. 

Chronicles the history of women's suffrage, highlighting the contributions of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and such other reformers as Sojourner Truth, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucy Stone.

March is Women's History Month. Find out about the many brave and talented  women who have influenced world history by reading some of these titles from the Library's collection:

March 1, 1781. The Articles of Confederation were ratified by Congress. Under the Articles, Congress was the sole governing body of the new American national government, which consisted of the 13 original states. They remained in effect throughout  the Revolutionary War, until the U.S. Constitution was adopted in 1789.

March 1, 1932. The 20-month-old son of  Charles A. Lindbergh was kidnapped from his home in Hopewell, New Jersey.

March 1, 1974.  Seven former high-ranking officials of the Nixon White House  - including former chief of staff, H.R. Haldeman, top aide John Ehrichman, and former attorney general, John Mitchell - were indicted for conspiring to obstruct the investigation into the Watergate break-in.

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