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October Birthdays

Read about some of the fascinating people who were born in the month of October!

Home: a memoir of my early years by Julie Andrews — October 1

The life of Graham Greene by Norman Sherry — October 2

Buster Keaton: cut to the chase by Marion Meade — October 4

Chester Alan Arthur by Zachary Karabell — October 5

Rocket man: Robert H. Goddard and the birth of the space age by David A. Clary — October 5

This little light of mine: the life of Fannie Lou Hamer by Kay Mills — October 6

Rabble-rouser for peace: the authorized biography of Desmond Tutu by John Allen — October 7

School Days

Now that school has begun for another year, this would be a good time to learn about some extraordinary teachers both past and present:

A schoolteacher in old Alaska: the story of Hannah Breece by edited and with an introduction and commentary by Jane Jacobs

Nothing daunted: the unexpected education of two society girls in the West by Dorothy Wickenden

The water is wide by Pat Conroy

Teacher man: a memoir by Frank McCourt

Beyond the miracle worker: the remarkable life of Anne Sullivan Macy and her extraordinary friendship with Helen Keller by Kim E. Nielsen

In the sun's house: my year teaching on the Navajo reservation by Kurt Caswell ; afterword by Rex Lee Jim

The March on Washington, 1963

The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom took place in Washington, D.C. on August 28, 1963. One of the largest political rallies for human rights in U.S. history, it was the site of Martin Luther King's historic I Have a Dream speech. In a year marked by racial unrest and numerous civil rights demonstations, Dr. King pleaded to "let freedom ring."

Nobody turn me around: a people's history of the 1963 march on Washington by Charles Euchner

Behind the dream: the making of the speech that transformed a nation by Clarence B. Jones and Stuart Connelly

The dream: Martin Luther King, Jr., and the speech that inspired a nation by Drew D. Hansen

The 1963 civil rights march by Scott Ingram

Doctors and Nurses in War

The new book Surgeon in Blue is the biography of Jonathan Letterman, the Civil War surgeon who, as chief medical officer for the Army of the Potomac, revolutionized combat medicine during four major battles of the war. Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg resulted in an unprecedented number of casualties, and his innovations saved countless lives. Among them was the first organized ambulance corps, and the establishment of hygiene and dietary standards. Learn about other brave doctors, nurses, and medics whose bravery and medical care saved lives while risking their own.

Revolutionary medicine, 1700-1800 by C. Keith Wilbur

Medics at war: military medicine from colonial times to the 21st century by John T. Greenwood, F. Clifton Berry Jr

Islamic Presentation

mosqueCome join us as Dr. Palmer and Dr. Siddiqui talk about Islam and its history on Thursday September 19 at 7 PM. Dr. Siddiqui is a PhD candidate in Islamic Studies at the University of Michigan and Dr. Palmer is a medical doctor in our community. They will be available afterward for questions and comments.

Davy Crockett

Davy Crockett was born on August 17, 1786. While he is probably best known for having perished at the Battle of the Alamo in San Antonio, Texas in 1836, he also served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1827 to 1831, representing the 9th district of Tennessee.

Born on a mountaintop: on the road with Davy Crockett and the ghosts of the wild frontier by Bob Thompson

David Crockett: the Lion of the West by Michael Wallis

Davy Crockett [videodisc] by A & E Television Network

The Alamo: an illustrated history by Edwin P. Hoyt

The blood of heroes: the 13-day struggle for the Alamo— and the sacrifice that forged a nation by James Donovan

Go West!

In 1890 the U.S. Census Bureau declared the American frontier to be "closed" - ending one hundred years of expansion. In July, 1893, Frederick Jackson Turner delivered his essay The Significance of the Frontier in American History at the World's Columbia Exposition in Chicago, explaining his views on how the idea of a frontier helped to shaped America's characteristics. Beginning with the mountain men and Lewis & Clark, and ending with the closing of the frontier, the Library has a great collection of resources available about our country's westward movement. Start with some of the titles below:

Across the Great Divide: Robert Stuart and the discovery of the Oregon Trail by Laton McCartney

After Lewis and Clark: mountain men and the paths to the Pacific by Robert M. Utley ; maps by Peter H. Dana

The American West by Dee Brown ; photos edited by Martin F.Schmitt

Medicare Signed Into Law

On July 30, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed Medicare into law. The event took place at the Truman Library in Independence, Missouri, where former president Harry Truman was enrolled as the health insurance program's first beneficiary. The program, which provides hospital and medical insurance for Americans 65 years or older, was signed into law as an amendment to the Social Security Act of 1935. For complete information on your Medicare benefits go the official website.

Social Security Handbook: overview of Social Security programs, 2013

Student's guide to landmark congressional laws on social security and welfare by Steven G. Livingston

The people's pension: the struggle to defend Social Security since Reagan by Eric Laursen

Alexis de Tocqueville

Born in Verneuil, France on July 29, 1805, Alexis de Tocqueville was the author of the classic text Democracy in America. Originally published in two volumes in 1835 and 1840, it was based on the author's 1831 visit to the United States, and described the social and economic changes taking place in the young nation. It is considered by some historians to be one of the most insightful books written about democracy.

Democracy in America by translated by Arthur Goldhammer

Democracy in America by translated by Arthur Goldhammer

Tocqueville's discovery of America by Leo Damrosch

Alexis de Tocqueville: a life by Hugh Brogan

Happy Birthday to our Nation's Capital!

fireworksOn July 16, 1790, President George Washington signed the Residence Act, officially approving the creation of a capital district to be located along the Potomac River on the country's East Coast. According to the U.S. Constitution, Washington, D.C. is not part of any state, but is under the exclusive jurisdiction of the United States Congress. Virginia and Maryland both donated land to form the capital district which was named in honor of our first president.

Through a fiery trial: building Washington, 1790-1800 by Bob Arnebeck

Washington: the making of the American capital by Fergus M. Bordewich

Washington burning: how a Frenchman's vision of our nation's capital survived Congress, the Founding Fathers, and the invading British Army by Les Standiford

Royal Baby Watch

Have you caught Royal Baby Fever? Are you anxiously awaiting the arrival of the new Prince or Princess of Cambridge? How about a little royal reading to keep you occupied until we hear the big announcement!

William and Kate: a royal love story by Christopher Andersen

William & Kate: a royal love story

William & Catherine: a royal wedding by Andrew Motion

Elizabeth the Queen: the life of a modern monarch by Sally Bedell Smith

Prince Philip: the turbulent early life of the man who married Queen Elizabeth II by Philip Eade

Philip and Elizabeth : portrait of a royal marriage by Gyles Brandreth