History

Profiles everyday life in fourteenth-century England, covering everything from period beliefs and styles to hygiene and medical practices, and also discusses the influence of warfare.

On this day, in 1620, the Mayflower set sail from England to the New World with 102 passengers on board. Bad weather and navigational errors meant that this journey took 66 days (History)! Read more about the pilgrims and their journey in these titles at the library. 

 

Mayflower Compact by Christine Honders

The Documents of American Democracy series homes in on several of the important foundation papers that are central to U.S. history. Though the Mayflower Compact is often neglected, the series wisely includes the first document of the U.S. government. Written aboard the Mayflower, it not only laid out rules for the Plymouth Colony but it was used as a blueprint for future American governments.

An illustrated account of the life of John Howland, the young servant who was indentured to Pilgrim John Carver, describes how he embarked on the Mayflower and survived a fall off the ship before helping his ill shipmates by scouting out a safe harbor.

Do you love the Medieval and Renaissance time periods? If so, you can now buy discounted Michigan Renaissance Festival tickets with the help of your library card. Michigan Adventure Pass (MAP) holders can purchase Adult tickets for $16.50 ($22.95 value) and children's tickets for $8.50 ($13.95 value). 

1.) Go to michrenfest.com

2.) Click on Tickets

3.) Click on Purchase Corporate Discount Tickets

4.) Enter Access Code: TLN17

​The Festival runs until October 1 and is located in Holly, MI (about a one hour drive north of Canton).

Learn more about Michigan Activity passes on our Community page. 

This month we've read a collection of essays by Pulitzer Prize winner, David McCullough, the real story about America's 'Wild West',  the 1947 World Series--the first to be televised, and two thrillers.

Also available in: audiobook | large print

This collection of speeches by historian David McCullough reminds us of fundamental American principles. Over the course of his distinguished career, David McCullough has spoken before Congress, the White House, colleges and universities, historical societies, and other esteemed institutions. Now, as many Americans engage in self-reflection following a bitter election campaign that has left the country divided, McCullough has collected some of his most important speeches in a brief volume that articulates important principles and characteristics that are particularly American.

Also available in: e-book

A revolutionary new appraisal of the Old West and the America it made The open range cattle era lasted barely a quarter-century, but it left America irrevocably changed. These few decades following the Civil War brought America its greatest boom-and-bust cycle until the Depression, the invention of the assembly line, and the dawn of the conservation movement. It inspired legends, such as that icon of rugged individualism, the cowboy. Yet this extraordinary time and its import have remained unexamined for decades. Cattle Kingdom reveals the truth of how the West rose and fell, and how its legacy defines us today. The tale takes us from dust-choked cattle drives to the unlikely splendors of boomtowns like Abilene, Kansas, and Cheyenne, Wyoming. We venture from the Texas Panhandle to the Dakota Badlands to the Chicago stockyards. We meet a diverse array of players--from the expert cowboy Teddy Blue to the failed rancher and future president Teddy Roosevelt. Knowlton shows us how they and others like them could achieve so many outsized feats: killing millions of bison in a decade, building the first opera house on the open range, driving cattle by the thousand, and much more. Cattle Kingdom is a revelatory new view of the Old West.
 

September 1, 1939. Hitler's armies invaded Poland, igniting the start of World War Ii.

September 2, 1666. The Great Fire of London began, raging for three days.

September 3, 1783. The Treaty of Paris, ending the Revolutionary War, was signed by John Adams, Ben Franklin and John Jay.

In this memoir of his time as a successful diplomat serving in various key capacities and as a member of Mikhail Gorbachev's staff, Kovalev reveals hard truths about his country as only a perceptive witness can do. In Russia's Dead End Kovalev shares his intimate knowledge of political activities behind the scenes at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Kremlin before and after the dissolution of the USSR in December 1991, including the Russia of Vladimir Putin. He documents the fall of the USSR, the post-Soviet explosion of state terrorism and propaganda, and offers a nuanced historical explanation of the roots of Russia's contemporary crisis under Vladimir Putin.

This timely book focuses on President Obama's deeply considered strategy toward Iran's nuclear program and reveals how the historic agreement of 2015 broke the persistent stalemate in negotiations that had blocked earlier efforts. The deal accomplished two major feats in one stroke: it averted the threat of war with Iran and prevented the possibility of an Iranian nuclear bomb. .

The Detroit riot of 1967 by Hubert G Locke

During the last days of July 1967, Detroit experienced a week of devastating urban collapse-one of the worst civil disorders in twentieth-century America. Forty-three people were killed, over $50 million in property was destroyed, and the city itself was left in a state of panic and confusion, the scars of which are still present today. Now for the first time in paperback and with a new reflective essay that examines the events a half-century later, The Detroit Riot of 1967 (originally published in 1969) tells the story from the perspective of Hubert G. Locke, then administrative aide to Detroit's police commissioner. An hour-by-hour account is given of the looting, arson, and sniping, as well as the problems faced by the police, National Guard, and federal troops who struggled to restore order.

The politics of upheaval, 1935-1936 by Arthur M. Schlesinger

A brilliant reconsideration of the events and the political, social, and religious movements that led to France's embrace of Fascism and anti-Semitism.

"The book to read is not the one which thinks for you, but the one which makes you think." —James McCosh (1811-1894)

In The Unruly City, historian Mike Rapport offers a vivid history of three intertwined cities toward the end of the eighteenth century-Paris, London, and New York-all in the midst of political chaos and revolution. From the British occupation of New York during the Revolutionary War, to agitation for democracy in London and popular uprisings, and ultimately regicide in Paris, Rapport explores the relationship between city and revolution, asking why some cities engender upheaval and some suppress it. Why did Paris experience a devastating revolution while London avoided one? And how did American independence ignite activism in cities across the Atlantic? Rapport takes readers from the politically charged taverns and coffeehouses on Fleet Street, through a sea battle between the British and French in the New York Harbor, to the scaffold during the Terror in Paris. The Unruly City shows how the cities themselves became protagonists in the great drama of revolution.

Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook

"In this incredible follow-up to the New York Times and USA TODAY bestseller FaceOff, twenty-two of the world's most popular thriller writers come together for an unforgettable anthology. MatchUp takes the never-before-seen bestseller pairings of FaceOff and adds a delicious new twist: gender. Eleven of the world's best female thriller writers from Diana Gabaldon to Charlene Harris are paired with eleven of the world's best male thriller writers, including John Sandford, C.J. Box, and Nelson DeMille. The stories are edited by #1 New York Times bestselling author Lee Child"--.

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