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Happy Birthday, Hershey's Chocolate Company!

If you’re a chocolate lover, February 9 is no ordinary day — it’s the day that Hershey’s Chocolate Company was founded in 1894. Hershey’s was started by Milton S. Hershey, the son of a Mennonite family who had little formal education but went on to become one of the richest men in America. By 1905, Hershey had built a state-of-the art factory to mass-produce chocolate bars, wafers and other delicious delectables. By 1907, his company had cracked the code and created what would become their best-selling product: the Hershey’s kiss. Coincidentally (or not!), Valentine’s Day is just around the corner, so celebrate by getting your sweetie some Hershey’s kisses and checking out a book about this American original.
2010 BookLetters LLC)

Cool Book Series Alert!

If you've ever been interested in the history of famous Wonders of the World, check out Elizabeth Mann's series. Covering structures from the Taj Mahal to the Brooklyn Bridge, there's all sorts of cool information and beautiful photos/artwork in these books. Look for them today on the Children's Department New Bookshelf!

Great Michigan Read: Stealing Buddha's Dinner

The Great Michigan Read program selection is Stealing Buddha’s Dinner by Bich Minh Nguyen and this month the University of Michigan Library is hosting the Michigan Humanities Council’s traveling exhibit, Their Journey: Vietnamese in Michigan, which is on display February 1-24, 2010 (University of Michigan Hatcher Graduate Library, Ann Arbor) as well as a live webcast conversation on February 10 with Professor Peter Ho Davies and

A Personal View of the Bible

On Sunday, February 21 at 2:00PM in the University of Michigan's Hatcher Graduate Library (Room 100/Gallery) Curator Kathryn Beam will share her personal memories of how the exhibit History of the Bible from Ancient Papyri to King James came to be and what the process has meant to her in Sharing a Personal View of the Bible Exhibit.

Sponsored by the University of Michigan Special Collections Library.

Trivia Resource

If you've ever been interested in the meaning behind a particular country or state's flag, the World Book Encyclopedia of Flags is for you. Covering everywhere from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe, this series provides brief country and state histories, along with detailed information about flags. It's pretty cool to figure out that a colorful stripe or star on a country's flag represents more than just a nifty decoration! Happy Reading!

Howard Zinn, Historian, Civil Rights Activist, Educator, Dead at 87

Howard Zinn (1922 – 2010) an American historian and Professor of Political Science at Boston University from 1964 to 1988, died on Wednesday, January 27, 2010. He was the author of more than 20 books. Zinn was active in and wrote extensively about the African-American Civil Rights Movement 1955-1968, civil rights and civil liberties and peace movements. In his best-selling A People's History of the United States, "he concentrated on what he saw as the genocidal depredations of Christopher Columbus, the blood lust of Theodore Roosevelt and the racial failings of Abraham Lincoln.

Invictus

Opening in the Detroit area tomorrow, the film Invictus tells the inspiring true story of how newly elected South African president Nelson Mandela joined forces with the captain of South Africa’s rugby team, to help unite their country. Knowing that his nation remained racially divided - as well as economically - in the wake of apartheid, Mandela and team captain Francois Pienaar used the universal language of sport to rally South Africa’s underdog rugby team to an unlikely run to the World Cup Championship

Fourscore and Seven Years Ago...

...or maybe a little bit longer than that. On November 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address. In this short, but powerful speech that is still known almost one hundred and fifty years later, Lincoln spoke about ideas of both war and freedom. Find out more about our sixteenth president on this historic day.

Fall of the Berlin Wall

Thousands of visitors, including dignitaries and world leaders, are in Berlin today to mark the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. The Wall divided the city and Germany into East and West for three decades until it was brought down on November 9, 1989. Today's celebration will include concerts, fireworks and the symbolic collapse of a wall of oversize dominoes that has been set up in the area where the Wall once stood. It will be toppled later today - just like the Wall was 20 years ago.

Amelia Earhart

Amelia, starring Hilary Swank and Richard Gere opened in theaters on October 23rd.  Check out our collection of Amelia Earhart books and movies  to learn more about this adventurous woman pilot.

National American Indian Heritage Month

In 1990 President George H. W. Bush approved a joint resolution designating November 1990 National American Indian Heritage Month. Similar proclamations have been issued each year since 1994. The National Register of Historic Places has put together a list of sites promoting the history and culture of Native Americans. The following Special Collection is designed to highlight some of the library's many resources about Native Americans.

General Reference

Historical Dictionary of North American Archaeology edited by Edward B. Jelks: This comprehensive guide to mainly prehistoric sites, cultures and artifacts in the United States and Canada features some 1800 signed entries by 151 expert contributors.

American Indians edited by Harvey Markowitz: This three-volume set, arranged alphabetically in an encyclopedia style, highlights hundreds of important characters, events, places and concepts in Native American culture. Also included are a timeline, addresses of educational institutions, agencies, museums as well as statistical information.

Ellis

Many of us have ancestors who made their way from foreign lands to a small island at the mouth of the Hudson River. Once known as Little Oyster Island, Ellis Island acquired it's present name from a colonial New Yorker named Samuel Ellis. The immigration station opened in 1892 where 12 million immigrants were processed before it wound down in 1924 and finally closed in November of 1954. For every thousand weary faces that passed through there were a thousand different stories of hope, promise and anticipation.

An excellent new book on the topic is American Passage: The History of Ellis Island by Vincent J. Cannato. Learn more about this place and the people who came together to form this unique blend of customs and cultures we call America.

Disappearing World: 101 of the Earth's most extraordinary and endangered places

Disappearing World will take readers on a remarkable journey to the world's most extraordinary and endangered locations. Since 1972, sites of natural, historic, and cultural significance have been designated as World Heritage sites by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization. Discover the earth's most amazing places before they disappear completely.

They could do it!

When the United States entered World War II, American men went into the military and American women filled their places in the offices and factories. "We can do it" was the slogan and Rosie the Riveter was the symbol of these working women. The American Rosie the Riveter Association has gathered together the stories of the "Rosies" and, thanks to a donation by a Rosie, the Canton Library has the set of these books.

Fun History Reads

Looking for some fun history books that won't put you to sleep? Try one of the books in the You Wouldn't Want To series. Each of these books puts you in the place of an average person who lived through some crazy, exciting period in time. From constructing the pyramids to sailing on the Titanic, there's something for everyone. The CPL's newest edition is You Wouldn't Want to be a World War II Pilot! For more information on some of the books in this entertaining series check out the publisher's website.

The Mystery of 2012

According to the plot of a new film being released on November 13, the world will come to an end on December 21, 2012. Supposedly based on the fact that the Mayan calendar "runs out" after that date, there has been a slew of books, articles and websites devoted to this phenomenon - as well as the aforementioned film 2012. So what's it really all about?

World Digital Library

Looking for primary documents? The World Digital Library can help. It contains manuscripts, maps, letters, rare books, recordings, film, photographs and architectural drawings from around the world and in different languages. You can browse their online collection by region, time period, topic, the type of institution that houses the item (like the Library of Congress or the Bibliotheca Alexandrina), or by the type of item. For example, here is a map of British Antarctic expeditions from 1907 to 1909 made by the famous explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton!

HeritageQuest

An excellent Genealogy resource, the HeritageQuest Online includes the U.S. federal censuses from 1790 to 1930, 22,000 digitized family history and local history books, and more than 250 primary-source documents such as tax lists, city directories, probate records, Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty Land Warrant Application Files, the Freedman’s Bank Records, and more.

Polish-American Heritage Month

October is Polish American Heritage Month and your library can help you celebrate! Our International Language Collection features fiction and non-fiction materials written in Polish. Who wouldn't savor, Cooking the Polish Way by Zamojska-Hutchings. Children may enjoy I am Polish American by Samuel Kapowski, about a young boy who talks of his Polish heritage, including foods, customs and famous Poles. If music is more your style our CD collection features Homage to Polish Music and myriad polkas for all. For additional information on Polish Heritage Month visit the Polish American Center.