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History

Immigration, Islam, and Identity: A Conversation with Eli Eteraz

Children of Dust a memoir written by Ali Eteraz reveals Islamic fundamentalism and madrassa life in rural Pakistan, the culture shock of moving to the U.S., and a journey of reconciliation to the modern Middle East. Author Ali Eteraz will speak on Wednesday, April 21st, 2010 at 12:00pm in the University of Michigan's Hatcher Graduate Library, Gallery - Room 100 (use Diag entrance).

Award Winning Military History

Memorial Day was originally known as Decoration Day because it was a time set aside to honor the nation's Civil War dead by decorating their graves. It was first widely observed on May 30, 1868, to commemorate the sacrifices of Civil War soldiers. Here is a list of award winning military history by year with links to other related book awards.

For a shorter list, see the bookmark entitled "Books About WWII" listed under our nonfiction bookmarks or to view films with war settings, see "Feature Films about WWII" listed under our "Movies" bookmarks.

The Ghost Army

In June of 1944, an exceptional U.S. Army unit went into action in Normandy. Its weapons included hundreds of inflatable tanks and a one-of-a-kind collection of sound effects records, and it carried out its battlefield mission without firing a shot. The unit was officially called the 23rd Headquarters Special Troops, but it was known to its men as The Ghost Army. Members of The Ghost Army adhered to a decades-long gag order; many never told their families about their extraordinary military service. Now the Ghost Army is here! Sixty-five years after this top-secret group went into action, the University of Michigan’s Hatcher Library will unveil the first public exhibit of this captivating group of materials documenting The Ghost Army. This exhibit is available during library hours.

History of the Irish in Detroit Now Available

The Gaelic League and Irish-American Club of Detroit turns 90 this year. Whether your roots stem from Eire or you just know you were Irish in another life, you'll want to check out its pictorial history, A Glimpse of Irish Detroit: through the eyes of the Gaelic League, now available just in time for St. Paddy's Day.

Lincoln in the Courtroom with Judge Ron Lowe

Join us as Judge Ron Lowe, 35th district court judge in Plymouth, shares his characterization of Abraham Lincoln as a courtroom lawyer.  We can compare Lincoln's courtroom to our modern day courtrooms as portrayed in Scott Turow's "Presumed Innocent", the Everyone's Reading selection and original courtroom thriller.
Monday, February 22nd at 7:00 pm in the library community room.  Join the community dialogue by joining in the community read of "Presumed Innocent."

How'd They Do That?

How'd They Do That? is another cool history series that just hit our shelves! It examines how people lived hundreds of years ago. If you've ever wondered what people used to do when they got sick or how they had fun, this is the series for you. It covers everywhere from Ancient Persia to Colonial America. Look for these books on the Children's New Bookshelf today!

Happy Birthday, Hershey's Chocolate Company!

If you’re a chocolate lover, February 9 is no ordinary day — it’s the day that Hershey’s Chocolate Company was founded in 1894. Hershey’s was started by Milton S. Hershey, the son of a Mennonite family who had little formal education but went on to become one of the richest men in America. By 1905, Hershey had built a state-of-the art factory to mass-produce chocolate bars, wafers and other delicious delectables. By 1907, his company had cracked the code and created what would become their best-selling product: the Hershey’s kiss. Coincidentally (or not!), Valentine’s Day is just around the corner, so celebrate by getting your sweetie some Hershey’s kisses and checking out a book about this American original.
2010 BookLetters LLC)

Cool Book Series Alert!

If you've ever been interested in the history of famous Wonders of the World, check out Elizabeth Mann's series. Covering structures from the Taj Mahal to the Brooklyn Bridge, there's all sorts of cool information and beautiful photos/artwork in these books. Look for them today on the Children's Department New Bookshelf!

Great Michigan Read: Stealing Buddha's Dinner

The Great Michigan Read program selection is Stealing Buddha’s Dinner by Bich Minh Nguyen and this month the University of Michigan Library is hosting the Michigan Humanities Council’s traveling exhibit, Their Journey: Vietnamese in Michigan, which is on display February 1-24, 2010 (University of Michigan Hatcher Graduate Library, Ann Arbor) as well as a live webcast conversation on February 10 with Professor Peter Ho Davies and

A Personal View of the Bible

On Sunday, February 21 at 2:00PM in the University of Michigan's Hatcher Graduate Library (Room 100/Gallery) Curator Kathryn Beam will share her personal memories of how the exhibit History of the Bible from Ancient Papyri to King James came to be and what the process has meant to her in Sharing a Personal View of the Bible Exhibit.

Sponsored by the University of Michigan Special Collections Library.

Trivia Resource

If you've ever been interested in the meaning behind a particular country or state's flag, the World Book Encyclopedia of Flags is for you. Covering everywhere from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe, this series provides brief country and state histories, along with detailed information about flags. It's pretty cool to figure out that a colorful stripe or star on a country's flag represents more than just a nifty decoration! Happy Reading!

Howard Zinn, Historian, Civil Rights Activist, Educator, Dead at 87

Howard Zinn (1922 – 2010) an American historian and Professor of Political Science at Boston University from 1964 to 1988, died on Wednesday, January 27, 2010. He was the author of more than 20 books. Zinn was active in and wrote extensively about the African-American Civil Rights Movement 1955-1968, civil rights and civil liberties and peace movements. In his best-selling A People's History of the United States, "he concentrated on what he saw as the genocidal depredations of Christopher Columbus, the blood lust of Theodore Roosevelt and the racial failings of Abraham Lincoln.

Invictus

Opening in the Detroit area tomorrow, the film Invictus tells the inspiring true story of how newly elected South African president Nelson Mandela joined forces with the captain of South Africa’s rugby team, to help unite their country. Knowing that his nation remained racially divided - as well as economically - in the wake of apartheid, Mandela and team captain Francois Pienaar used the universal language of sport to rally South Africa’s underdog rugby team to an unlikely run to the World Cup Championship

Fourscore and Seven Years Ago...

...or maybe a little bit longer than that. On November 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address. In this short, but powerful speech that is still known almost one hundred and fifty years later, Lincoln spoke about ideas of both war and freedom. Find out more about our sixteenth president on this historic day.

Fall of the Berlin Wall

Thousands of visitors, including dignitaries and world leaders, are in Berlin today to mark the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. The Wall divided the city and Germany into East and West for three decades until it was brought down on November 9, 1989. Today's celebration will include concerts, fireworks and the symbolic collapse of a wall of oversize dominoes that has been set up in the area where the Wall once stood. It will be toppled later today - just like the Wall was 20 years ago.

Amelia Earhart

Amelia, starring Hilary Swank and Richard Gere opened in theaters on October 23rd.  Check out our collection of Amelia Earhart books and movies  to learn more about this adventurous woman pilot.

National American Indian Heritage Month

In 1990 President George H. W. Bush approved a joint resolution designating November 1990 National American Indian Heritage Month. Similar proclamations have been issued each year since 1994. The National Register of Historic Places has put together a list of sites promoting the history and culture of Native Americans. The following Special Collection is designed to highlight some of the library's many resources about Native Americans.

General Reference Books

Historical Dictionary of North American Archaeology edited by Edward B.

Ellis

Many of us have ancestors who made their way from foreign lands to a small island at the mouth of the Hudson River. Once known as Little Oyster Island, Ellis Island acquired it's present name from a colonial New Yorker named Samuel Ellis. The immigration station opened in 1892 where 12 million immigrants were processed before it wound down in 1924 and finally closed in November of 1954. For every thousand weary faces that passed through there were a thousand different stories of hope, promise and anticipation.

An excellent new book on the topic is American Passage: The History of Ellis Island by Vincent J. Cannato. Learn more about this place and the people who came together to form this unique blend of customs and cultures we call America.

Disappearing World: 101 of the Earth's most extraordinary and endangered places

Disappearing World will take readers on a remarkable journey to the world's most extraordinary and endangered locations. Since 1972, sites of natural, historic, and cultural significance have been designated as World Heritage sites by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization. Discover the earth's most amazing places before they disappear completely.