History

Presidents Day

Instead of going to the mall for the Presidents Day sale, you can really celebrate by brushing up on some presidential history. A great place to start is the Internet Public Library's POTUS which provides biographical information, historical documents, and audio and video files. If this doesn't satisfy your historical sweet tooth, check out Public Papers of the Presidents at the American Presidency Project which has digitized over 85,000 documents related to the Presidency, including audio and video. Still not enough? The Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections contains detailed national results of all U.S. presidential elections since 1789. And if you want to compare today's presidential campaigns with those of the recent past, browse the Museum of the Moving Image's site The Living Room Candidate where you can find more than 300 commericals from every presidential elections since 1952. Of course, the library has many great books on the presidents — both biographies of individual presidents and histories of the office.

Women Who Changed America

In celebration of Women's History Month, we are pleased to host two luminaries from our past:  former first lady Mary Todd Lincoln and famous author Beatrix Potter.  Re-enactor Marie Papciak will bring these two famous women to life in her presentation.  With over 30 years of experience, Ms. Papciak will bring the characters to life to the delight of children and adults alike on Saturday, March 16 at 2:00 PM.  No registration is required.  

Richard III Remains Found

The remains of Richard III, King of England 1483-1485 have been found under a parking The earliest surviving portrait of Richard (c. 1520, after a lost original), formerly belonging to the Paston family.lot in Leicester, UK.  They have been positively identified by comparing DNA with two descendents of Richard's sister.  The remains have been missing for over 500 years.  Following the Battle of Bosworth Field where Richard III was killed, his remains were unceremoniously dumped without a marker.  (Image: The earliest surviving portrait of Richard (c. 1520, after a lost original), formerly belonging to the Paston family Society of Antiquaries, London)

Rosa Parks' 100th Birthday

Civil rights activist Rosa Parks was born on February 4, 1913 in Tuskegee, Alabama. On December 1, 1955 she refused to obey a bus driver's order to give up her seat  to a white passenger, setting off the Montgomery Bus Boycott. This became one of the defining moments of the Civil Rights Movement leading to nationwide efforts to end segregation of public facilities. She eventually moved to Detroit where she lived until her death in 2005.

Rosa Parks: my story by Rosa Parks with Jim Haskins

Rosa Parks by Douglas Brinkley

Time Is...Time Was... February 2013

What We're Reading: February 2013

Vietnam War Peace Agreement Anniversary

Forty years ago, on Januuary 27, 1973 the Paris Peace Accords were signed - ending the Vietnam War. During the long conflict, the United States suffered over 58,000 soldiers killed and approximately 153, 000 wounded, as well as 1,943 missing in action.

A bright shining lie: John Paul Vann and America in Vietnam by Neil Sheehan

Ending the Vietnam War: a history of America's involvement in and extrication from the Vietnam War by Henry Kissinger

The best and the brightest by David Halberstam

Gold!

165 years ago, on January 24, 1848, gold was discovered at Sutter's Mill setting off the California Gold Rush. People began flocking to the state later that year, but the majority didn't arrive until the next year — hence the term "forty-niners." All told, the news drew some 300,000 people from all over the world (Latin America, Europe, Australia and China) between the years 1849 and 1855, to seek their fortune in California.

The age of gold: the California Gold Rush and the new American dream by H.W. Brands

The California Gold Rush and the coming of the Civil War by Leonard L. Richards

Days of gold: the California Gold Rush and the American nation by Malcolm J. Rohrbough

Black History Month Storyteller

Join noted storyteller Alfreda Harris as she dazzles us with stories about Martin Luther King, Jr and the Walk to Freedom exhibit on loan to the library from the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. Visit the exhibit, located near the main Information Desk, then listen as Ms. Harris takes us on a journey in celebration of the Civil Rights movement. Suitable for tween, teens and adults on Tuesday, February 26 at 7:00 PM.

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