History

What We're Reading July 2013

Happy Birthday to our Nation's Capital!

fireworksOn July 16, 1790, President George Washington signed the Residence Act, officially approving the creation of a capital district to be located along the Potomac River on the country's East Coast. According to the U.S. Constitution, Washington, D.C. is not part of any state, but is under the exclusive jurisdiction of the United States Congress. Virginia and Maryland both donated land to form the capital district which was named in honor of our first president.

Through a fiery trial: building Washington, 1790-1800 by Bob Arnebeck

Washington: the making of the American capital by Fergus M. Bordewich

Royal Baby Watch

Have you caught Royal Baby Fever? Are you anxiously awaiting the arrival of the new Prince or Princess of Cambridge? How about a little royal reading to keep you occupied until we hear the big announcement!

William and Kate: a royal love story by Christopher Andersen

William & Kate: a royal love story

William & Catherine: a royal wedding by Andrew Motion

Elizabeth the Queen: the life of a modern monarch by Sally Bedell Smith

Prince Philip: the turbulent early life of the man who married Queen Elizabeth II by Philip Eade

Book Club Choices: July 2013

Ten Books Every American Should Read...

Common sense by Thomas Paine

1776 by David McCullough

Founding brothers: the revolutionary generation by Joseph J. Ellis

The Declaration of Independence by illustrated and inscribed by Sam Fink

Animal farm by George Orwell ; preface by Russell Baker ; introduction by C.M. Woodhouse

1984: a novel by George Orwell ; with an afterword by Erich Fromm

Look What's In Large Print July 2013

In celebration of our nation's 237th birthday and the 150th anniversary of the Battle at Gettysburg...

American creation [Large print]: triumphs and tragedies at the founding of the Republic by Joseph J. Ellis

Benjamin Franklin [large print] by Edmund S. Morgan

Bunker Hill [large print]: a city, a siege, a revolution by Nathaniel Philbrick

The killer angels [Large print] by Michael Shaara

Samuel Adams [Large print]: a life by Ira Stoll

Battle of Gettysburg for Tweens and Teens

150 Years ago, the battle of Gettyburg was just ending today. Learn more about this historic and bloody battle while earning badges for Connect Your Summer.

You wouldn't want to be a Civil War soldier!: a war you'd rather not fight by written by Thomas Ratliff ; illustrated by David Antram ; created and designed by David Salariya

The Battle of Gettysburg and Lincoln's Gettysburg Address by Carin T. Ford

The Battle of Gettysburg: would you lead the fight? by Elaine Landau

Tillie Pierce: teen eyewitness to the Battle of Gettysburg by Tanya Anderson

Battle of Gettysburg 150th Anniversary

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg which was fought from July 1 to July 3, 1863 in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Approximately 51,000 soldiers from both sides were killed, wounded, or captured during the battle considered a turning point of the war. At the end of the third day, General Robert E. Lee and the Confederate army was forced to retreat back to Virginia. Four months later, on November 19, President Lincoln dedicated the Soldiers National Cemetery at the site with the historic speech that came to be known as the Gettysburg Address.

Great Reads for the Fourth of July

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