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History

Life Among the Royals

If Prince William and Kate Middleton's upcoming wedding has piqued your interest in all things royal, then check out the following films and television series from the Library's collection. And don't forget to set your alarm clock for 6:00AM Friday morning to catch all of the festivities!

TV Series

Elizabeth I by HBO Films

Elizabeth R. Discs 1 & 2 by British Broadcasting Corporation

May is Older Americans Month 2011

Since 1963, May has been declared Older Americans Month by the Agency on Aging. The theme of this year's celebration — Older Americans: Connecting the Community — pays homage to the many ways in which older adults bring inspiration and continuity to the fabric of our communities. It also highlights the many ways technology is helping older Americans live longer, healthier and more engaged lives.

Fascinating Stories Behind Everyday Things

You've probably heard the expression "Every picture tells a story." Well, it seems that even the most familiar objects have a story to tell. If you've ever wondered about the origins of your microwave, or why teacups have handles, or just where did those foam peanuts in your package came from, then this is the place for you!

Books

At home: a short history of private life by Bill Bryson — While walking through his own home, a former Church of England rectory built in the 19th century, the author reconstructs the fascinating history of the household, room by room. The bathroom provides the occasion for a history of hygiene; the bedroom, sex, death, and sleep; the kitchen, nutrition and the spice trade, and on and on.

Titanic

On April 15th, 1912, RMS Titanic sank after striking an iceberg during its maiden voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. Curious about the history of Titanic? Check out some nonfiction titles like the following:

882 1/2 amazing answers to your questions about the Titanic by Hugh Brewster and Laurie Coulter

Story of the Titanic by Steve Noon; illustrated by Eric Kentley

The Titanic: an interactive history adventure by Bob Temple

Civil War Anniversary

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the American Civil War. The first shots were fired on April 12, 1861 at Fort Sumter in South Carolina's Charleston Harbor. Confederate forces let by Brig. General P.G.T. Beauregard demanded the surrender of the fort and opened fire when the Union commander, Maj. Robert Anderson, refused. He was forced to evacuate the next day, however, and this battle became the first engagement of the war. It raged on for four more years until Robert E. Lee surrendered to Ulyssses S. Grant on April 9, 1865 at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia.

Gloryland: A Conversation

Shelton Johnson, author of Gloryland will discuss his book on Thursday, April 14 at Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, Gallery-Room 100 (use Diag entrance) at 913 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI. Public parking is available in the structure at 650 S. Forest, just south of S. University.

Gloryland is the fictional memoir of a buffalo soldier — a black U.S. cavalryman and the son of slaves — who finds true freedom when he is posted to patrol the newly created Yosemite National Park in 1903.

Apple Computer

Apple Computer was founded on April 1, 1976. Can you believe it's been 35 years since Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs founded Apple Computer?

Read about these genius geeks and visit the Apple museum. Check out Apple's history and find out more about these inventors.

Last U.S. Vet­eran of World War I Laid to Rest

Arlington National CemeteryU. S. Army Corporal Frank Woodruff Buckles lived to be 110, the last of nearly 5 million U.S. veterans of a dimly remembered war — a generation now laid to rest. Buckles, who fibbed his way into the Army at 16, was a rear-echelon ambulance driver in war-ravaged France, miles behind the battlefront. (Source: Washington Post)

Places & Spaces: Mapping Science

Thursday, March 17, 4:00-7:00PM: Open House
This month at the Hatcher Graduate Library, the theme is “Mapping Science” in conjunction with the current Library Gallery exhibit Places & Spaces: Mapping Science, a traveling exhibit created by Dr. Katy Börner of Indiana University. The exhibit was created to demonstrate the power of maps to navigate and manage physical places but also abstract topic spaces. It introduces knowledge mapping techniques to the general public. It is meant to inspire cross-disciplinary discussion on how to best track and communicate human activity and scientific progress on a global scale. Allow time to view maps from the Map Library as well as the exhibit.

Celebrate St. Patrick's Day

Celebrate St. Patrick's Day with the talented dancers from O'Hare School of Irish Dance in Plymouth. We'll all be clapping our hands, tapping our toes and feeling very Irish for the evening. The dancers will be followed by an Irish folktale as told by one of our very clever librarians. Faith and Begorrah!
See you Thursday, March 10 at 7:00PM in the Community Room.

Bubble Wrap on Detroit History!

A recent Detroit News Article highlights a collection of historically significant automobiles owned by the Detroit Historical Museum. Part of this amazing collection of cars in currently being stored at Fort Wayne in Detroit. The entire collection features approximately 60 cars that are rotated for display in the museum. While in storage, the cars are kept in plastic bubbles that help preserve these historical gems. Facinating on all counts, this article serves as a great reminder of just how historically rich the city of Detroit is.

Chinese New Year

Celebrate the Year of the Rabbit with crafts, songs, dancing and food. Join us at the library for a fun celebration beginning at 5:00PM with crafts for the kids followed by snacks and entertainment; at 7:00PM for everyone. This should be a great Chinese New Year for everyone. No registration is needed for this February 17th event.

Happy Birthday Thomas Edison

Today is Thomas Edison's 164th birthday. Thomas Edison was one of the world's most famous inventors. Some of his inventions include the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and an electric light bulb. He has 1,093 U.S. patents under his belt making him one of, if not the, most achieved inventors of all time. Learn more about Thomas Edison and his inventions.

RoboCop Statue a "Rocky" Proposition?

RoboCop, a cinematic gem of the 1980s, exemplifies the attitude of many people toward Detroit: crime-infested urban ruins. So, despite the title character being [spoiler alert] a hero, the movie's setting is not depicted in such a positive light.

This is in contrast to Rocky, which shows Philadelphia in a mostly-neutral light; along with a glorious training montage that made the Philadelphia Museum of Art steps an icon and tourist attraction. Given the positive effect of Rocky on Philly tourism, the strong identification of that film with a particular filming location, demand for a statue for photography purposes, and the pre-existence of a bronze Rocky statue (which was created as a prop for Rocky III), the permanent installation of the prop statue seems natural.
Now, in Detroit, with the resurgence of civic pride and national recognition:

Some people have come forward to have a statue of Detroit film history erected.

But where? The Detroit in the film bears little resemblance to the rising-Phoenix-Detroit we see today. Additionally, no location in the film was particularly memorable above others. Maybe RoboCop isn't the right fictional Detroiter for a statue. Here are some films set in Detroit for your sculptural inspiration:

Black Americans Making Their Stamp on History

In honor of Black History Month stop by and view our display case near the receptionist desk. It includes an authentic USPS Black Heritage stamp collection and portraits on loan from the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. Also showcased are just a few of the many Black Americans that have given their lives to shape our world through leadership, inventions, medicine, arts & entertainment, civil rights, sports, education, and more.

Check out our wide selection of materials including books, videos, CD’s and cassette tapes noting the achievements and notable moments in history of those of African descent. Let’s celebrate Black History Month together here at your Canton Public Library!
(image from Kevin Fell at HOZA)

Motown Museum

Note: This event has been canceled due to unforeseen circumstances.

Kick off Black History Month by reminiscing about Motown greats, such as the Temptations, the Supremes, the Miracles and Smokey Robinson and many more. It was an era of unique Detroit sound shared around the country. Lina Stephens, chief curator of the Motown Museum, shares the history, the personal stories and music with us.
No registration is needed

Remember the [blank]

A call to remember notable events, especially surprise attacks and disasters, is a well-known trope in the cultural memory. As George Santayana quipped, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." So, in case you have forgotten, here are some resources for remembrance of things past:

Remember the Alamo

The Alamo: a cultural history by Frank Thompson

Sleuthing the Alamo: Davy Crockett's last stand and other mysteries of the Texas Revolution by James E. Crisp

The Alamo [videodisc] by The History Channel

Remember the Maine

How the battleship Maine was destoyed by H.g. Rickover