History

California Statehood

California was admitted to the United States on September 9, 1850. Originally colonized by the Spanish in the 17th century, it became part of Mexico in 1821. In 1846, a group of American settlers declared an independent California Repulic shortly after the beginning of the Mexican-American War. The California Gold Rush of 1848 led to a huge increase in Califronia's population and started an economic boom.

What We're Reading: September, 2014

This month is a mix of history, mystery, a book about books and reading, growing old, and second chances.

Can't we talk about something more pleasant? by Roz Chast

The Mountaintop School for Dogs and other second chances by Ellen Cooney

The 40s: the story of a decade by The New Yorker ; edited by Henry Finder with Giles Harvey ; introduction by David Remnick

The shelf: from LEQ to LES by Phyllis Rose

Buried in a bog by Sheila Connolly

Labor Day

This legal holiday is celebrated in the United States on the first Monday of every September. The first Labor Day celebration dates back to a parade in New York on Tuesday, September 5, 1882. More than half the states were celebrating Labor Day by 1893, but it wasn't made a national holiday until June 28, 1894, when President Grover Cleveland signed it into law.

Books

Reference

Historical encyclopedia of American labor by edited by Robert Weir and James P. Hanlan

Labor conflict in the United States: an encyclopedia by edited by Ronald L. Filippelli — editorial assistant, Carol Reilly

US Labor History

Bread--and roses: the struggle of American labor, 1865- 1915 by Milton Meltzer — illustrated with contemporary prints & photographs — Using diaries, newspaper reports and other source material, the author shows the industrialization of America and the workers' struggle for higher working standards.

World War I: The End and the Aftermath

The British Burn Washington

Two hundred years ago this year, during the War of 1812,  the British army occupied Washington, setting fire to many public buildings, including  the White House and the Capitol. It was on  August 24, 1814, that approximately 4.000 troops entered the city, causing most of the residents to flee. A warning was dispatched to First Lady Dolley Madison who managed to escape across the Potomac River with a portrait of George Washington in tow. This was the only time since the American Revolution that a foreign power has captured the United States capital.
 

The burning of Washington: the British invasion of 1814 by Anthony S. Pitch

 

 

World War I: the Americans

Although the United States did not enter the war until 1917, the American Expeditionary Force suffered 320,500 casualties. In memory of the 100th anniversary of the war read about some of these brave men and women:
 

Yanks: the epic story of the American Army in World War I by John S.D. Eisenhower with Joanne Thompson Eisenhower

 

Five lieutenants: the heartbreaking story of five Harvard men who led America to victory in World War I by James Carl Nelson

 

The long way home: an American journey from Ellis Island to the Great War by David Laskin

 

 

 

 

American women in World War I: they also served by Lettie Gavin

 

 

 

 

Three Days of Peace and Music

"By the time we got to Woodstock, we were half a million strong." Those words, written by Joni Mitchell in her famous song about the event, perfectly captured the feelings about the music festival for those who were there. It was forty five years ago on August 15, 1969, that thousands of people gathered in rural Bethel, New York to attend what would become an historic outdoor concert. For those who attended - and even like Mitchell - those who could not, Woodstock became a defining moment.

World War I: the Campaigns

The battles of World War I were fought in Europe, the  Middle East, and the Pacific. In memory of the war's 100th anniversary, check out some of the library's many resources on this global event whose repercussions are still being felt today:
 

To conquer hell: the Meuse-Argonne, 1918 by Edward G. Lengel

 

 

Verdun: the longest battle of the Great War by Paul Jankowski

 

 

 

Castles of steel: Britain, Germany, and the winning of the Great War at sea by Robert K. Massie

 

 

 

Yanks: the epic story of the American Army in World War I by John S.D. Eisenhower with Joanne Thompson Eisenhower

 

 

 

World War I: Personal Narratives

Nixon Resignation

This year marks the 40th anniversary of the resignation of Richard Nixon. It was on August 9, 1974 that Nixon became the first president in U.S. history to resign the office. As revelations related to the Watergate scandal continued to escalate, he resigned in the face of almost certain impeachment.

The final days by Bob Woodward, Carl Bernstein

Nixonland: the rise of a president and the fracturing of America by Rick Perlstein

The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It by Dean, John W

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