History

Today marks the 75th anniversary of the surprise attack on Hawaii's Pearl Harbor by the Imperial Japanese Navy. The early morning attack on December 7, 1941 on the U.S. fleet stationed in the harbor, and at Hickam Field where 51 airplanes were on the ground, was the catalyst for the United States' entry into World War II. Nine ships were sunk and twenty-one were severely damaged and nearly half of the airplanes were destroyed or severely damaged. The death toll numbered 2,403 - 1,177 from the battleship Arizona alone.

Day of infamy by Walter Lord

On December 1, 1955 Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a white man on a  Montgomery, Alabama bus. Her act of nonviolent resistance sparked a boycott of public buses in that city that lasted for 381 days. On June 4, 1956, a federal ruling,  Browder v. Gayle, declared that Alabama's racial segregation laws for buses were unconstitutional. After the state appealed the decision, the case went to the U.S. Supreme Court where on November 13, 1956 the ruling was upheld, leading to a city ordinance authorizing black bus passengers to sit anywhere they chose. The boycott officially ended December 20, 1956. Find out more more about this important milestone in Civil Rights, as well as the history of dissent in United States history with some of the following titles from the Library's collection.

December 1, 1919.  Lady Nancy Astor became the first woman in the British House of Commons.

December 1, 1955.  Rosa Parks was arrested in Montgomery, Alabama, for refusing to give up her seat to a white man and move to the back section of a municipal bus. This action resulted in a year-long boycott of the city's  bus system by African Americans.

December 1, 1988.  Benazir Bhutto was nominated to become prime minister of Pakistan, later becoming the first woman to govern a Muslim nation

December 2, 1954.   Senator Joseph McCarthy is condemned by the United States Senate for misconduct following his ruthless investigations of thousands of alleged Communists.

Check out what's available at Canton Public Library.  This Wednesday, December 7 at 7:00PM in the Community Room, Yankee Air Museum's Randy Hotton shares his extensive research on the Willow Run Bomber Plant and How Detroit Saved the World. Need help with your e-reader?  Drop-in assistance is available at the Information desk every Friday from 10:00 -11:00AM.  Looking for a book group? We offer four book groups which meet monthly at the library: Lunch and a Book, Canton Seniors Book Group (for 55+), the Non-Fiction Book Group, and the Adult Contemporary Book Group.

November 8, 1923.  Hitler's "Beer Hall Putsch" took place in Munich took place, wherein Hitler, Goering and armed Nazis attempted, but ultimately failed, to forcibly seize power and overthrow democracy in Germany.

November 9 -10, 1938.  Kristallnacht ("the night of broken glass") took place in Germany as Nazi mobs burned synagogues and vandalized Jewish shops and homes.

November 9, 1989.  The Berlin Wall was opened after standing for 28 years during which it completely cut off West Berlin from Eastern Germany. The almost 28 mile long wall had been built  in 1961.

November 14, 1889.  Newspaper reporter Nellie Bly set out from New York to beat the record of Jules Verne's fictional hero Phileas Fogg, who famously traveled around the world in 80 days. And, another young woman reporter, Elizabeth Bisland, set off at the same time to see who could accomplish the feat first.

The 1901 Pan American Exposition in Buffalo, meant to herald the twentieth century, went tragically, spectacularly, awry. In 1901, Buffalo, New York, the eighth biggest city in America, wanted to launch the new century with the Pan American Exposition. It would showcase the Western hemisphere and bring millions of people to western New York. With Niagara Falls as a drawing card and with stunning colors and electric lights, promoters believed it would be bigger, better, and--literally--more brilliant than Chicago's White City of 1893. Weaving together narratives of both notorious and forgotten figures, Margaret Creighton unveils the fair's big tragedy and its lesser-known scandals.

The age of daredevils by Michael Clarkson

By turns a family drama and an action-adventure story, The Age of Daredevils chronicles the lives of the men and women who devoted themselves to the extraordinary sport of jumping over Niagara Falls in a barrel--a death-defying gamble that proved a powerful temptation to a hardy few.

Willow Run by Randy Hotton

Unlike World War I, when the horrors of battle were largely confined to the front, World War II reached into the lives of ordinary people in an unprecedented way. Entire countries were occupied, millions were mobilized for the war effort, and in the end, the vast majority of the war's dead were non-combatant men, women, and children. Inhabitants of German-occupied Europe experienced forced labor, deportation, mass executions, and genocide. As direct targets of and witnesses to violence, rather than far-off bystanders, civilians were forced to face the war head on. Drawing on a wealth of diaries, letters, fiction, and other first-person accounts, historian Peter Fritzsche redefines our understanding of the civilian experience of war across the vast territory occupied and threatened by Nazi Germany.

A thrilling Cold War narrative exploring two harrowing attempts to rescue East Germans by tunneling beneath the Berlin Wall, the U.S. television networks who financed and filmed them, and the Kennedy administration's unprecedented attempt to suppress both films.

The plots against Hitler by Danny Orbach

A new and definitive account of the anti-Nazi underground in Germany and its numerous plots to assassinate Adolf Hitler.

In honor of Native American Heritage Month check out some of the biographies of notable First Americans from the Library's collection or go to this list for more information.

Tecumseh : a life by John Sugden
Sacajawea by Harold P Howard

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