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Detroit ... Remember When?

Anybody who grew up in the Detroit area has fond memories of the people, places and things that formed their childhood. Some are still with us but others have disappeared into history. Whatever the case, take a trip back in time and revisit them right now!

Hudson's: Detroit's legendary department store by Michael Hauser and Marianne Weldon


Sanders confectionery by Greg Tasker


From Soupy to nuts: a history of Detroit television by Tim Kiska


Hydroplane racing in Detroit, 1946-2008 by David D. Williams and the Hydroplane and Raceboat Museum


Detroit's Belle Isle: island park gem by Michael Rodriguez and Thomas Featherstone

Great Lakes Shipwrecks

Documentary Detroit

Detropia [videodisc] by Loki Films presents ; in association with Ford Foundation/Justfilms and ITVS, Impact Partners and Vital Projects ; produced and directed by Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady


Detroit [videodisc]: remember when by produced by WTVS in association with the Detroit Historical Society and Museums


The Hudson's building [videodisc] by an Urban Gralic production ; presented by Public Benefit Corporation


Searching for Sugar Man [videodisc] by a Sony Pictures Classics release of a Red Box Films/Passion Pictures production in association with Canfield Pictures and the Documentary Co. ; produced by Simon Chinn, Malik Bendjelloul ; written and directed by Malik Bendjelloul


Henry Ford [videodisc]


Burn (DVD) [videorecording]

Canton Seniors Book Discussion: July-November 2014

The Canton Seniors Book Discussion Group meets on the fourth Thursday of the month in Group Study Room A from 2:00-3:00PM.   In December we meet to share favorite titles and make suggestions for the coming year. No registration is required.

July 24

Gone girl: a novel by Gillian Flynn




August 28

The light between oceans: a novel by M.L. Stedman





September 25

The book thief by Markus Zusak




October 23

Me before you by Jojo Moyes




November 20 (Meets the 3rd Thursday this month)

Dallas 1963 by Bill Minutaglio and Steven L. Davis

D-Day 70th Anniversary

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the Allied invasion of occupied France during World War II. The operation began on June 6, 1944 and was the largest single-day amphibious invasion of all time, with 160,000 troops landing on the Normandy coast. President Obama will attend the D-Day commemorative events in France.

The dead and those about to die: D-Day: the Big Red One at Omaha Beach by John C. McManus


Neptune: the Allied invasion of Europe and the D-Day landings by Craig L. Symonds


Double cross: the true story of the D-day spies by Ben Macintyre


Fortitude: the D-Day deception campaign by Robert Hesketh ; introduction by Nigel West

Tiger Stadium Documentary "Stealing Home"

"Stealing Home", winner of the recent Freep Film Festival audience award, chronicles the history of Tiger Stadium and the recent action of the Navin Field Grounds Crew to resurrect and maintain the remaining footprint of this historic location. This film presents the day-to-day activities of the Grounds Crew alongside historic imagery of the field from the past 100 years. Join us on Wednesday, June 18, 7:00-8:45 PM, as we watch this fantastic piece of Detroit Tiger history and then join director Jason Roche, Professor of Communication Studies at University of Detroit-Mercy, for an informative Q&A. This presentation is open to patrons of all ages and is a must-see for baseball fans and history buffs alike. This is also a CYS Game On: On the Scene approved program. Click here for Grantland's story on the topic from the recent Detroit feature.

Great Reads for Memorial Day

Baghdad at sunrise: a Brigade Commander's war in Iraq by Peter R. Mansoor ; foreword by Donald Kagan and Frederick Kagan


The coldest war: a memoir of Korea by James Brady


The coldest winter: America and the Korean War by David Halberstam


Countdown to victory: the final European campaigns of World War II by Barry Turner


Dear America: letters home from Vietnam by edited by Bernard Edelman for The New York Vietnam Veterans Memorial Commission ; [with a new introduction by Senator John McCain ; foreword by William Broyles, Jr.]


A life in a year: the American infantryman in Vietnam, 1965-1972 by James R. Ebert

Made in Michigan

Michigan Week (May 17-24) is a good time to remember the state's celebrated natives from all walks of life. Communities across Michigan can lay claim to renowned authors, artists, musicians, actors, athletes, politicians, inventors and more. Film makers Francis Ford Coppola, Sam Raimi, Michael Moore, and Paul Schrader were all born in Michigan. Just some of the world famous musicians born here include Stevie Wonder, Kenny Burrell, Betty Carter, Earl Klugh, Bog Seger, Glen Frey, Madonna, and Iggy Pop. Actors born in the state include Bruce Campbell, Tom Selleck, Lily Tomlin, Ellen Burstyn, Kristen Bell, Julie Harris, George Peppard, George C. Scott, Danny Thomas, and Marlo Thomas — the list goes on. Noteworthy authors such as Edna Ferber, Terry McMillan, Judith Guest and Marguerite De Angeli are also Michigan natives. Famous Michigan born athletes include baseball players Charlie Gehringer, Jim Abbott and Hal Newhouser. Find out more about our state's notable heritage by checking out some of the following items from the Library's collection.

Alden B. Dow: midwestern modern by Diane Maddex — Architect

The Dodge brothers: the men, the motor cars, and the legacy by Charles K. Hyde — Automobile engineers

Power of the Press

May 3 has been designated as World Press Freedom Day in recognition of a "free, pluralistic and independent press" and its essential part of a democratic society. Indeed, the purpose of journalism, said Chicago newspaper columnist and humorist Peter Finley Dunne in the early 1900s, is to "comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable." Although modern journalists have often been the targets of severe criticism, it is also true that throughout the centuries, and even today, journalism has been a force for making America a better place to live.

Shaking the foundations: 200 years of investigative journalism in America by Edited by Bruce Shapiro


To keep the waters troubled: the life of Ida B. Wells by Linda O. McMurry


Taking on the trust: the epic battle of Ida Tarbell and John D. Rockefeller by Steve Weinberg

It Happened in May!

Read about some of the many history-making events occurred in the month of May:

Family History Sleuth: Getting Started with Genealogy

With so much information available online and at the library, getting started on your family history has never been easier. Kris Rzepczynski, a coordinator at the Library of Michigan, will highlight the tools available to help sleuth out your long, lost relatives. This program will explore key resources, including census records and newspapers, online tools and databases to assist you in your research, and successful strategies for finding your elusive ancestors. Join us July 24th at 7:00 PM.

Happy Birthday Wrigley Field!

Chicago's Wrigley Field opened 100 years ago today on April 23,baseball 1914. It has been the home of the Chicago Cubs since 1916, and is the oldest active National League baseball park. The American League's Fenway Park in Boston is the oldest overall, having opened on April 20, 1912.


A nice little place on the North Side: Wrigley Field at one hundred by George F. Will


Wrigley Field: a celebration of the friendly confines by photos by Stephen Green ; text by Mark Jacob ; foreword by Ernie Banks


100 years of Wrigley Field [videodisc] by producer, Major League Baseball Production ; writer, Jeff Scott

Strange But True!

To quote Mark Twain "Truth is stranger than fiction..." and the following titles are certainly proof of that!

Lord Minimus: the extraordinary life of Britain's smallest man by Nick Page — Th true story of Jeffrey Hudson, the 18-inch "official dwarf" of the 17th century Stuart court.


The last alchemist: Count Cagliostro, master of magic in the age of reason by Iain McCalman — A fascinating account of the career of one of the most famous charlatans of the 18th century, Count Alessandro di Cagliostro, who traveled all over Europe - usually one step ahead of the authorities - passing himself off as an alchemist and a healer.


Agent Zigzag: a true story of Nazi espionage, love, and betrayal by Ben MacIntyre — Eddie Chapman was a charming criminal, a con man, and a philanderer. He was also one of the most remarkable double agents Britain has ever produced.

Turn!

The new AMC drama Turn, starring Jamie Bell, tells the thrilling story of America's first spy ring during the Revolutionary War.  Known as the Culper RIng, it was made up of a farmer and his childhood friends in and around Long Island, New York. Based on the book Washington's Spies by Alexander Rose, the drama was created and written by Michigan's own Craig Silverstein. For more  on this topic try some of these resources:

George Washington's secret six: the spy ring that saved the American Revolution by Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger


Unlikely allies: how a merchant, a playwright, and a spy saved the American Revolution by Joel Richard Paul


Nathan Hale: the life and death of America's first spy by M. William Phelps