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Government/Law

We the People

The Obama Administration has launched a new website called We the People where ordinary citizens can petition the White House to take up any issue of importance to them. Participants must be 13 years or older and have an account on Whitehouse.gov. Once a petition is submitted, the creator must work to gather support. If a petition meets the 5,000 signature threshold in 30 days or less, the issue will be reviewed by the White House.

Magazine Express

As the Canton Public Library continues to deal with a declining budget, patrons are reminded the "magazine express" program has been discontinued.

Follow the Money

Do you ever wonder where all of your tax dollars are being spent? Do you need to know what the country's national debt is — and who's holding it? Or do you just want to know what campaign donations are being received by your legislators — and from whom? The answers to all of these burning questions can be found by a few clicks of your browser. USASpending.gov is a searchable database of all federal contracts, including the amount of the award and who's receiving it. For complete up to the minute information on the national debt, the U.S. Treasury site has it all. And to follow your legislators' campaign funds there are several places to check.

The Man Who Never Died

September 22, 5:30-7:00 PM, A talk with author William M. Adler, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery

The man who never died : the life, times, and legacy of Joe Hill, American labor icon by William M. Adler — Joe Hill was convicted of murder in Utah in 1914 and sentenced to death by firing squad. In the international controversy that ensued, many believed Hill was innocent but condemned for being a union man. Author William M. Adler spent four years investigating the case, and in a biography that reads like a murder mystery, argues convincingly for Hill’s innocence.

The Age of Piracy

Theft is a problem endemic to human nature. But what if theft were a victimless crime? In the computer age, copying a file from a friend or from the web has become easy and widespread; and it is often criminal in nature. The following books give insight into whether this is a problem of enforcement, of intellectual property laws, or of both:

The pirate's dilemma : how youth culture is reinventing capitalism by Matt Mason

Downloading copyrighted stuff from the Internet : stealing or fair use? by Sherri Mabry Gordon

Michigan Scanner Law

As part of the 2011 Shopper Reform and Modernization Act, the new Scanner Law goes into effect September 1st. The actual document for this act is very lengthy, but the most important fact is that consumers should know is the following: If the consumer is charged more than the displayed cost, they are entitled to request the difference between the displayed price and what they were charged, plus additional compensation ("bonus") of ten times the difference. The bonus must be at least $1.00, but may not be more than $5.00.
[Photo courtesy of eLibrary]

Canton Response to Hate Crime Coalition

The Canton Response to Hate Crime Coalition is committed to working to secure the right of every person in Canton to be free from hate crimes and bias-motivated incidents. What is a hate crime? Who are its victims? How do we prevent hate crimes? Come hear the answers and get ideas about how to guide your children in a tolerant, non-violent, non-bullying life. Bring your questions and concerns on Thursday, September 8 at 7:00 PM in the Community Room to Officer Dale Waltz of the Canton Public Safety Department and library director Eva Davis, Coalition co-chair. 

The Affordable Care Act Fact Sheet

Generations United recently published a fact sheet explaining The Affordable Care Act (ACA) and it's impact on older adults and children: Health Care Benefits for Children & Older Adults: The Affordable Care Act.

J300-399—Come Visit Us

Are you looking for something fun and exciting to read? Well, look no more, have we got the section for you. Check out the J Nonfiction 300 to 399 section for all sorts of great reads including folktales, fairytales, environmental topics, career books, government books, Boy Scout badge books, Girl Scout books, and so much more. See you there!

Michigan Tax Amnesty In Effect Until June 30th

The State of Michigan is offering delinquent taxpayers the opportunity to pay past due state taxes and have penalty charges waived. Taxpayers who qualify would also avoid criminal prosecution by the Michigan Department of Treasury. To be eligible, all taxpayers must submit the complete amnesty application and full payment, including interest, by June 30, 2011. Visit mitaxamnesty.org for more information.

The Great Michigan Read 2011-2012

The Michigan Humanities Council is proud to feature Arc of Justice: A Saga of Race, Civil Rights and Murder in the Jazz Age as the 2011-12 Great Michigan Read. Written by Detroit native Kevin Boyle, Arc of Justice tells the story of African American Dr. Ossian Sweet and the chain of events that occurred after he purchased a home for his family in an all-white Detroit neighborhood in 1925.

Managing Employees and Social Media: How To Keep Yourself Out of Trouble

Are you concerned about the potential ramifications of your employees and social media? Aaron Graves, a labor and employment attorney, will discuss the ins and outs of your rights and your employee's rights when it comes to social networking. This Strategies of Success (SOS) seminar takes place on Tuesday, May 17th from 7:30-9:30AM in the Summit on the Park Banquet Center. Space is limited so please reserve your spot by calling the Canton Chamber of Commerce at (734) 453-4040.

May is Older Americans Month 2011

Since 1963, May has been declared Older Americans Month by the Agency on Aging. The theme of this year's celebration — Older Americans: Connecting the Community — pays homage to the many ways in which older adults bring inspiration and continuity to the fabric of our communities. It also highlights the many ways technology is helping older Americans live longer, healthier and more engaged lives.

A Conversation with Eugene Robinson

Journalist Eugene Robinson, former managing editor of the Washington Post, Pulitzer Prize winner and University of Michigan's first African-American co-editor of The Michigan Daily will speak on Friday, April 29 at Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library from 1:00-2:30PM. Robinson appears frequently on MSNBC as a political analyst, on shows such as Countdown with Keith Olbermann, Morning Joe, The Rachel Maddow Show and Hardball with Chris Matthews.

Eugene Robinson will receive an Honorary Degree from the University of Michigan at Saturday's graduation ceremony.

(Photo: University of Michigan Library)

How Do We Age?

Thousands of Medicare beneficiaries will receive an invitation in May to be part of a special study looking at the impact of age-related changes on functional ability. The National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) will be seeking some 9,000 people aged 65 and older to participate in this long-term study, funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health. NHATS will examine how the daily lives of older adults change as they age. Participants will be randomly chosen from across the country.

Alzheimer's Diagnostic Guidelines Updated

For the first time in 27 years, clinical diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer’s disease dementia have been revised, and research guidelines for earlier stages of the disease have been characterized to reflect a deeper understanding of the disorder. The National Institute on Aging/Alzheimer’s Association Diagnostic Guidelines for Alzheimer’s Disease outline some new approaches for clinicians and provide scientists with more advanced guidelines for moving forward with research on diagnosis and treatments.
(Photo credit: PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images/elibrary)