Food/Cooking

June is National Dairy Month! Americans love dairy products. We consume about 275 pounds of milk, cheese, yogurt, butter and ice cream a year! Consuming dairy products helps maintain healthy bones, teeth and gums throughout our lives. Nutrients found in dairy products include calcium, protein, potassium and vitamins. Want to learn more? Visit Maybury Farm in Northville where you can meet farm animals and learn about farming. And check out some amazing books about all things dairy and dairy substitutes! 

A wide-ranging history of a surprisingly controversial form of nourishment. Milk, from humans and a variety of animals, is the subject of the latest enthusiastic investigation by the prolific Kurlansky (Paper: Paging Through History, 2016, etc.), winner of the James Beard Award and Bon Appetit's Food Writer of the Year Award, among other accolades. For 10,000 years, milk has been "the most argued-over food in human history," the author asserts, with experts opining about whether milk was fit for human consumption, whether babies should be breast-fed (and by whom—their own mothers or wet nurses), which mammal produced the best milk, whether milk should be pasteurized and homogenized, how cows should be raised and milked, and what effects such interventions as hormones, antibiotics, and genetically modified crops have on the milk we consume. Although many cultures feature milk-based creation myths, breast-feeding has long been a source of contention. Excavations of ancient Roman gravesites have turned up baby milk bottles, indicating that some babies were artificially fed. In the Middle Ages, artificial feeding was common, with numerous recipes for baby formulas; in 1816, one writer advised that babies should be suckled on goats, setting off a trend throughout Europe. Also popular was the employment of wet nurses, who often became live-in domestics. The choice of wet nurse was not simple: Many believed that the baby would inherit the nurse's disposition and traits; one doctor recommended that "a brunette with her first child, which should be a boy" made the ideal wet nurse. Especially in cities, spoilage, unclean udders, and unsanitary dairies caused illness and a great number of infant deaths. Pasteurization was a solution, but consumers complained about the taste. Debate about the safety of raw milk, much prized by cheese makers and organic farmers, still rages. Kurlansky looks at the production of milk and its uses in liquid and solid form (yogurt, butter, cheese, ice cream, pudding) around the world throughout history and into the present.Chock-full of fascinating details and more than 100 recipes.

The average American eats 33 pounds of cheese a year, and physician and veganism advocate Barnard (Power Foods for the Brain) asserts that giving it up could be a route to improved overall health. Cheese, he warns, is an essentially unhealthy product-filled with fat, cholesterol, and sodium-and has addictive properties as well. Despite an overly alarmist tone, Barnard is effective in explaining how the "ultimate processed food" is manufactured, and, with plenty of statistics to hand, why it isn't healthful. To this end, he raises the array of medical problems potentially associated with dairy or obesity. Barnard's antidote is a standard plant-based food plan. Readers can eschew cheese and create healthier versions of favorite foods by following 70 recipes developed by vegan cookbook author Dreena Burton for meals, snacks, and desserts. The book also lists versatile cheese replacements employing nut butters, non-dairy plant milks, coconuts, and soy. 

For decades, he worked 13-hour days as a line cook in restaurants in New York and the Northeast before he became executive chef in the 1990s...until his "madcap" memoir about the dark corners of New York’s restaurants made him into a celebrity chef and touched off a nearly two-decade career as a globe-trotting television host.

“We have lost someone who was in my opinion the sharpest and keenest observer of culture that I have ever known,” [Andrew Zimmern] said. “When we were alone his hopes and dreams extended into amazing areas.” - New York Times

Free and confidential suicide prevention hotlines

  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 800-273-8255 (Open 24 hours a day, every day, for everyone. Ayuda En Español)
  • Crisis Text Line: text HOME to 741741
  • The Trevor Project: 866-488-7386 (for LGBT youth)
  • Trans Lifeline: U.S.: 877-565-8860 | Canada: 877-330-6366 (for transgender people with transgender staff)

 

Chef and author Anthony Bourdain travels the world sampling local foods and culture.

The 16th annual Canton Area Senior Summit, hosted by Canton Supervisor Pat Williams, will be held on Wednesday, May 30 from 8:30 AM-2:00 PM at Canton's Summit on the Park. Typically held in September, this year's Senior Summit has been moved to May to accommodate fall renovations to the facilities at Summit on the Park.

During the Senior Summit, enjoy a continental breakfast, box lunch, goody bag, and door prizes. The day includes a variety of workshops, health screenings, and informational booths hosted by area community service and health providers. Tickets are free but participants are asked to please pre-register at Club 55+ by calling (734) 394-5485.

 

If you enjoyed reading about Grace Thomas, the American Girl character who visits Paris and wants to start her own bakery, you might be interested in these titles.

Fiction

The 12 dares of Christa by Marissa Burt

Thirteen-year-old Christa's plans for her favorite holiday are derailed when her parents announce their divorce and Christa spends Christmas in Europe with her mom, but even though her dad remains in Chicago, he sends Christa on a scavenger hunt made up of dares that send her all over Florence, Paris, and London.

Tween Test Kitchen

Have you been looking for a chance to experiment in the kitchen? This is your chance! Test out your cooking chops with unique and silly recipes that you can recreate at home. All supplies will be provided. For ages 9-12. Registration is required. 

#Food by Med Coolman is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Upcoming sessions

Wednesday, June 27 - 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM Community Room Microwave Mug Meals Registration required.
Wednesday, July 25 - 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM Community Room Tiny Food Party Registration required.
Wednesday, August 15 - 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM Community Room Gross Goodies

Sensory Snacks: A Healthy Twist on Summer Snacks

Making healthy choices can be a challenge all year round and sugary, carb-laden summer treats can be hard to resist. The library is the place to help your family achieve your best and healthiest summer ever by offering a family-friendly Sensory Snackfest! Join us in the Community Room to create your own healthy, homemade and wholesome snacks from 3 of our Snackfest stations: nut-free, gluten-free trail mix, rainbow healthful fruit kebabs, and super nutritious s’mores. We’ll take these classic summer snacks and give them a healthy spin without losing the fun! The library is where you can get your Snackfest fix! All ages and abilities are welcome! No registration required!

Upcoming sessions

Saturday, June 30 - 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM Community Room

This week we had a tasty Dessert Storytime! Since we did this theme twice, there are twice as many books to enjoy. Be sure to grab a snack before reading. 

Books Read in Storytime

Webpages

  • Sweet Paul: Full of easy-yet-elegant recipes, stylish crafts, entertaining ideas, shopping tips and more.
  •  Smitten Kitchen: Fearless cooking from a tiny kitchen in New York City.
  • Half Baked Harvest: From simple dishes to indulgent desserts.
  • Love & Lemons: Healthy, seasonal, whole food cooking.
  • Minimalist Baker: All recipes require 10 ingredients or less, 1 bowl or 1 pot, or 30 minutes or less to prepare. 

Ebooks and Books

Tired of making the same dishes every holiday season? Looking for new recipes to wow your guests? Stop by and browse our Holiday Recipe Kiosk. We have filled it with many interesting recipes, including gluten free and vegan options. We've also pulled a selection of cookbooks for easy browsing.

 

In case you missed our Tea Party storytime this week, don't worry. Here are some of the fun stories and songs we shared, plus some extras to do your own elegant and delicious storytime at home.

From Storytime

Tea party rules by Ame Dyckman

An friendly, but firm little girl makes a bear cub follow all the rules at her tea party before he is allowed to eat any of the cookies. Things don't turn out quite how either of them planned.

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