Arts/Crafts

Family Reading Night: Origami Party

Paper crane

Family Reading Nights are back! Join us in celebrating sharing books together. There will be stories and activities centered around fun themes and we will even raffle off books to help grow your own personal library. This program is for children ages 4-9 and their families. Registration is required for all children attending. Parents and caretakers are not required to register. 

Origami by Carollina_Li (CC BY-NC 2.0)

 

 

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

March is National Craft Month. Check out some of the books below to get your creative juices flowing! 

Offers instructions for several craft projects inspired by prominent figures from African American culture and history.

Presents facts about backyard animals and insects along with step-by-step instructions for creating an assortment of related crafts, including a googly-eyed squirrel, a robin's nest, clothespin grasshopper clips, and a chipmunk pencil cup.

According to a recent Gallup Poll, Americans are reading more than they used to; "the survey did not track the types of books that Americans read by age group, but book reading in general is fairly similar by age group among U.S. adults. It is a bit more prevalent among the oldest and youngest age groups than among those in the middle years. Roughly nine in 10 adults aged 18 to 29 (91%) report reading at least one book in the past year -- possibly related to the required reading among college students within this age group. The percentage among those aged 65 and older is 85%. Nearly four in 10 respondents in both age groups say they read more than 10 books.

The most meaningful differences in reading behavior since 2002 are evident among Americans aged 65 and older. Collectively, they are reading more books than the same age group did in 2002. The percentage reading one or more books increased from 68% to 85%, including a four-percentage-point increase in those reading 11 or more, from 33% to 37%."

 

Lennon on Lennon is an authoritative, chronologically arranged anthology of some of Lennon's most illuminating interviews, spanning the years 1964 to 1980. The majority have not been previously available in print, and several of the most important have not been widely available in any format. Interspersed throughout the book are key quotes from dozens of additional Q&As. Together, this material paints a revealing picture of the artist in his own words while offering a window into the cultural atmosphere of the sixties and seventies.

Curtis Mayfield was one of the seminal vocalists and most talented guitarists of his era. But perhaps more important is his role as a social critic, and the vital influence his music had on the civil rights movement. "People Get Ready" is the black anthem of the 1960s, and on his soundtrack to the 1972 movie Super Fly, rather than glorifying the blaxploitation imagery of the film, Mayfield wrote and sang one of the most incisive audio portraits of black America on record. In this book Todd Mayfield tells his famously private father's story in riveting detail. Born into dire poverty, raised in the slums of Chicago, Curtis became a musical prodigy, not only singing like a dream but also growing into a brilliant songwriter. In the 1960s he became a pioneer, opening his own label and production company and working with many other top artists, including the Staple Singers. Curtis's life was famously cut short by an accident that left him paralysed, but in his declining health he received the long-awaited recognition of the music industry. Passionate, illuminating, vivid, and absorbing, Traveling Soul will doubtlessly take its place among the classics of music biography.

Peter O'Toole was supremely talented, a unique leading man and one of the most charismatic actors of his generation. Described by his friend Richard Burton as "the most original actor to come out of Britain since the war," O'Toole was also unpredictable, with a dangerous edge he brought to his roles and to his real life. With the help of exclusive interviews with colleagues and close friends, Robert Sellers' Peter O'Toole: The Definitive Biography paints the first complete picture of this complex and much-loved man. The book reveals what drove him to extremes, why he drank to excess for many years and hated authority, but it also describes a man who was fiercely intelligent, with a great sense of humor and huge energy. Giving full weight to his extraordinary career, this is an insightful, funny, and moving tribute to an iconic actor who made a monumental contribution to theater and cinema.
 

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Richard A. Serrano's new book American Endurance: The Great Cowboy Race and the Vanishing Wild West is history, mystery, and Western all rolled into one. In June 1893, nine cowboys raced across a thousand miles of American prairie to the Chicago World's Fair. For two weeks they thundered past angry sheriffs, governors, and Humane Society inspectors intent on halting their race. Waiting for them at the finish line was Buffalo Bill Cody, who had set up his Wild West Show right next to the World's Fair that had refused to allow his exhibition at the fair. The Great Cowboy Race occurred at a pivotal moment in our nation's history: many believed the frontier was settled and the West was no more. The Chicago World's Fair represented the triumph of modernity and the end of the cowboy age. Except no one told the cowboys. Racing toward Buffalo Bill Cody and the gold-plated Colt revolver he promised to the first to reach his arena, nine men went on a Wild West stampede from tiny Chadron, Nebraska, to bustling Chicago. But at the first thud of hooves pounding on Chicago's brick pavement, the race devolved into chaos. Some of the cowboys shipped their horses part of the way by rail, or hired private buggies. One had the unfair advantage of having helped plan the route map in the first place. It took three days, numerous allegations, and a good old Western showdown to sort out who was first to Chicago, and who won the Great Cowboy Race.
 

No single sea battle has had more far-reaching consequences than the one fought in the harbor at Hampton Roads, Virginia, in March 1862. The Confederacy, with no fleet of its own, built an iron fort containing ten heavy guns on the hull of a captured Union frigate named the Merrimack. The North got word of the project when it was already well along, and, in desperation, commissioned an eccentric inventor named John Ericsson to build the Monitor, an entirely revolutionary iron warship—at the time, the single most complicated machine ever made. Abraham Lincoln himself was closely involved with the ship’s design. 

Thorndyke Bear with Winter Clothes

Hey Kids,

In the winter months I like to dress in cozy clothes to keep warm. My favorite kind of warm weather clothes are the ones handmade by a favorite person, and some of my favorite stories to snuggle up with are about that cozy kind of creation. Read on for a list of a few knitting stories to share with a loved one. Don’t forget the fireplace and hot tea. 

Bear Hugs,

Thorndyke

The surprise by Sylvia van Ommen

In this wordless picture book, Sheep goes to great lengths to surprise Giraffe with a lovely red sweater.

DIA Away

DIA Away: Think Like an Artist is a free, mobile interactive classroom and a creative exploration space for people of all ages. It brings educational, hands-on art experiences across the tri-county area and will be visiting us here at Canton Public Library. 

This incredible program is housed in a fully furnished, vibrantly designed 53’ double-expandable trailer. Inside, participants will discover some of the ways artists think and then have the opportunity to try out creative thinking skills at digital and hands-on stations. Visitors will be surprised and inspired to discover the connections between themselves and the ways artists think and work.

Upcoming sessions

Monday, July 23 - 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM Outdoors

2017 LEGO® Fantastic Beasts Building Contest

Dragon made from LEGO®

Attention Builders!  Show us your most creative creature designs using LEGOs® in our Fantastic Beasts Building Contest! There are multiple divisions based on age: K-2nd, 3rd-4th, 5th-6th, 7th-8th, 9th-adult.  Contestants may enter individually or as part as a team.  Registration begins Thursday, December 22, and the Contest will take place Thursday, January 5.   Entries must be dropped off on January 4 between 6:00-8:00 PM or on January 5 or 9:00 AM-12:00 PM. A public viewing will be held on Thursday, January 5, 3:00-6:00 PM and an awards ceremony at 7:00 PM.  Patrons will have the opportunity to cast their vote for a Popular Vote winner separately from age category winners that will be chosen by our judges.

Need a warm-up for LEGO® building?  Come to the LEGO® Free Build on Tuesday, December 27, 10:00-12:00 and get your creative juices flowing!

Contest Rules

  1. Use your own LEGO®, Duplo, Megablocks or other LEGO® compatible plastic bricks, motors and materials.
  2. Entries must be your own creation, not a LEGO® designed kit or a project found online, in a book, or in a magazine.
  3. Your creation may not be larger than 2’ x 2’ x 2’.
  4. Participants must register online (beginning December 22) to ensure a space for display. Please also fill out the paper entry form (downloadable from the CPL web site) and bring it with you when you drop off your entry.
  5. Each person may enter only once. You may enter as an individual OR as part of a team but not both. Entering as a team is a way for families and friends to build together. Team entries will be judged in the age category of the oldest team member.
  6. You must adhere to the following participation schedule (see below).
  7. Canton Public Library cannot assume responsibility of LEGO® creations while they are on display, though we will have someone monitoring the room at all times.
  8. Entries must be taken home by Thursday, January 5, by 8:45 PM.

Participation Schedule

  • Wednesday, January 4
    • 6:00-8:00 PM: drop off entries
  • Thursday, January 5
    • 9:00 AM-12:00 PM: drop off entries
    • 12:00-3:00 PM: room closed for viewing set-up and judging
    • 3:00-6:00 PM: public viewing and popular vote casting
    • 6:00-7:00 PM: room closed for popular vote tallying and ceremony set-up
    • 7:00-8:00 PM: awards ceremony

 

Earth Dragon 02 by :jovian: (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Stop by our Connect Your Summer Command Center and add to our CYS Coloring Mural. All supplies are located near the front window. Once you've made your creative contribution, log in to Connect Your Summer online to claim your Be Creative On-the-Scene badge. While you're there, you can find more ways to earn badges and have fun with your library this summer.

The final day to earn badges is Wednesday, August 17. All prize drawing winners will be notified by email.

Harold and the purple crayon by Crockett Johnson

Harold decides to take a walk in the moonlight, but first he must create a moon with his purple crayon..

Despite the admonitions of his friends, a straight line enjoys expressing himself by twirling in whirls, pointing his joints, and creeping in heaps.

Lines that wiggle by Candace Whitman

A variety of monsters and other creatures demonstrate some of the different things that lines can do, from curve and curl to zig-zag.

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