Arts/Crafts

Films can transport us to another time, another place--that's the wonder of film.  

"No art form is as instantly and continuously gratifying as film. When the house lights go down and the lion roars, we settle in to be shocked, frightened, elated, moved, and thrilled. We expect magic. While we're being exhilarated and terrified, our minds are also processing data of all sorts--visual, linguistic, auditory, spatial--to collaborate in the construction of meaning. Thomas C. Foster's Reading the Silver Screen will show movie buffs, students of film, and even aspiring screenwriters and directors how to transition from merely being viewers to becoming accomplished readers of this great medium. Beginning with the grammar of film, Foster demonstrates how every art form has a grammar, a set of practices and if-then propositions that amount to rules. He goes on to explain how the language of film enables movies to communicate the purpose behind their stories and the messages they are striving to convey to audiences by following and occasionally breaking these rules. In Reading the Silver Screen, readers will gain the expertise and confidence to glean all they can from the movies they love,"--Amazon.com.

Whether we are trying to impress a date after an art-house film screening or discussing Oscar nominations with friends, we all need ways to watch and talk about movies. But with so much variety between an Alfred Hitchcock thriller and a Nora Ephron romantic comedy, how can everyday viewers determine what makes a good movie? In Talking Pictures, veteran film critic Ann Hornaday walks us through the production of a typical movie-from writing the script and casting to the final sound edit-and explains how to evaluate each piece of the process. How do we know if a film is well-written, above and beyond snappy dialogue? What constitutes a great screen performance? What goes into praiseworthy cinematography, editing, and sound design? And what does a director really do? Full of engaging anecdotes and interviews with actors and filmmakers, Talking Pictures will help us see movies in a whole new light-not just as fans, but as film critics in our own right.

How to watch a movie by David Thomson

From one of the most admired critics of our time, brilliant insights into the act of watching movies and an enlightening discussion about how to derive more from any film experience. Since first publishing his landmark Biographical Dictionary of Film in 1975 (recently released in its sixth edition), David Thomson has been one of our most provocative authorities on all things cinema. Now he offers his most inventive exploration of the medium yet: guiding us through each element of the viewing experience, considering the significance of everything from what we see and hear on-screen--actors, shots, cuts, dialogue, music--to the specifics of how, where, and with whom we do the viewing. With customary candor and wit, Thomson delivers keen analyses of a range of films from classics such as Psycho and Citizen Kane to contemporary fare such as 12 Years a Slave and All Is Lost, revealing how to more deeply appreciate both the artistry and (yes) manipulation of film, and how watching movies approaches something like watching life itself. Discerning, funny, and utterly unique, How to Watch a Movie is a welcome twist on a classic proverb: Give a movie fan a film, she'll be entertained for an hour or two; teach a movie fan to watch, his experience will be enriched forever.
 

To begin Connect Your Summer this year, you will receive a StoryBox. After that, it's up to you. Below are a few books to help you think about what exactly you might do with that box.

When a girl receives a beautiful porcelain box from her grandmother, she immediately wants something special to put inside it. What does she love best? She loves jumping in puddles on rainy days, blowing bubbles in the park, and watching her little sister's first steps. Life's most precious treasures cannot be contained in a box! Features a sparkly die-cut star on the cover, and flaps throughout reveal hidden surprises.

What to do with a box by Jane Yolen

Jane Yolen poetically reminds young readers that a simple box can be a child's most imaginative plaything as artist Chris Sheban illustrates its myriad and magical uses.

When her friend Simon moves away, Isabel, the girl with the parrot on her head, is upset until she meets a new friend named Chester.

Each May, the Administration for Community Living (ACL) leads our nation’s celebration of Older Americans Month (OAM). ACL designed the 2017 OAM theme, Age Out Loud, to give aging a new voice—one that reflects what today’s older adults have to say.  This theme shines a light on many important trends. More than ever before, older Americans are working longer, trying new things, and engaging in their communities. They’re taking charge, striving for wellness, focusing on independence, and advocating for themselves and others. What it means to age has changed, and OAM 2017 is a perfect opportunity to recognize and celebrate what getting older looks like today.

This follow-up to the popular blog, Advanced Style this book features 22 short essays by some of the portrait subjects, distilling the wisdom and lifestyle secrets of some of photographer and author, Ari Seth Cohen's favorite Advanced Style ladies.

Elaine Madsen and Virginia Madsen interview a variety of older women and explore how they have faced challenges in the past and present. Interviewees: Rita Moreno, Rosemary O'Callaghan, Olive McQueen, Lupe Anguiano, Valerie Sobel, Eartha Kitt, Marg Starbuck, Jean McFaddin, Maxine Hong Kingston, Elaine Kaufman, Nancy Freedman, Lucille Borgen, Tao Porchon Lynch, Elaine Madsen, Lauren Hutton, Suzanne Adams, and Gloria Steinem.
 

When Doris Miller meets John Fremont, sparks fly--at least for Doris. When Doris begins showing up at John's regular haunts, she wins over his Williamsburg friends. Her new life brings Doris a thrilling perspective, but also creates a rift between her and her longtime friends and family, who believe she's making a fool of herself over a guy half her age.

Zine Maker Workshop

Zine: a noncommercial often homemade or online publication usually devoted to specialized and often unconventional subject matter - Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Join us for an open workshop on creating your own Zine! Shortened from magazine, a zine is a small, self-produced publication on a topic of your choice. Please feel free to bring your own materials, like photos, to use in the zine. Basic materials and supplies to create the zine will be available. This program is for ages 13 and over. No registration required.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Explains the meaning of Japanese culture which is found in eight traditional handicrafts and provides instructions for creating them. Includes a list of materials needed.

Presents step-by-step instructions for creating nine handicraft projects inspired by Indian art, including ankle bells, a henna key chain, and a Diwali bowl.

Presents step-by-step directions for drawing the national flag, a castle, a stork, and other sights and symbols of Germany.

Family Reading Night: Origami Party

Paper crane

Family Reading Nights are back! Join us in celebrating sharing books together. There will be stories and activities centered around fun themes and we will even raffle off books to help grow your own personal library. This program is for children ages 4-9 and their families. Registration is required for all children attending. Parents and caretakers are not required to register. 

Origami by Carollina_Li (CC BY-NC 2.0)

 

 

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

March is National Craft Month. Check out some of the books below to get your creative juices flowing! 

Offers instructions for several craft projects inspired by prominent figures from African American culture and history.

Presents facts about backyard animals and insects along with step-by-step instructions for creating an assortment of related crafts, including a googly-eyed squirrel, a robin's nest, clothespin grasshopper clips, and a chipmunk pencil cup.

Presents facts about forest animals and the forest along with step-by-step instructions for creating an assortment of kooky forest animal crafts, including a moose sock puppet, a pom-pom bear pencil top, and a googly-eyed bat.

According to a recent Gallup Poll, Americans are reading more than they used to; "the survey did not track the types of books that Americans read by age group, but book reading in general is fairly similar by age group among U.S. adults. It is a bit more prevalent among the oldest and youngest age groups than among those in the middle years. Roughly nine in 10 adults aged 18 to 29 (91%) report reading at least one book in the past year -- possibly related to the required reading among college students within this age group. The percentage among those aged 65 and older is 85%. Nearly four in 10 respondents in both age groups say they read more than 10 books.

The most meaningful differences in reading behavior since 2002 are evident among Americans aged 65 and older. Collectively, they are reading more books than the same age group did in 2002. The percentage reading one or more books increased from 68% to 85%, including a four-percentage-point increase in those reading 11 or more, from 33% to 37%."

 

Lennon on Lennon is an authoritative, chronologically arranged anthology of some of Lennon's most illuminating interviews, spanning the years 1964 to 1980. The majority have not been previously available in print, and several of the most important have not been widely available in any format. Interspersed throughout the book are key quotes from dozens of additional Q&As. Together, this material paints a revealing picture of the artist in his own words while offering a window into the cultural atmosphere of the sixties and seventies.

Curtis Mayfield was one of the seminal vocalists and most talented guitarists of his era. But perhaps more important is his role as a social critic, and the vital influence his music had on the civil rights movement. "People Get Ready" is the black anthem of the 1960s, and on his soundtrack to the 1972 movie Super Fly, rather than glorifying the blaxploitation imagery of the film, Mayfield wrote and sang one of the most incisive audio portraits of black America on record. In this book Todd Mayfield tells his famously private father's story in riveting detail. Born into dire poverty, raised in the slums of Chicago, Curtis became a musical prodigy, not only singing like a dream but also growing into a brilliant songwriter. In the 1960s he became a pioneer, opening his own label and production company and working with many other top artists, including the Staple Singers. Curtis's life was famously cut short by an accident that left him paralysed, but in his declining health he received the long-awaited recognition of the music industry. Passionate, illuminating, vivid, and absorbing, Traveling Soul will doubtlessly take its place among the classics of music biography.

He was the Wicked Wilson Pickett, the legendary soul man whose forty-plus hits included "In the Midnight Hour," "634-5789," "Land of 1000 Dances," "Mustang Sally," and "Don't Let the Green Grass Fool You." Remarkably handsome and with the charisma to match, Wilson Pickett was considered by many to be the greatest, the most visceral and sensual of the classic 1960s soul singers, and as a man who turned screaming into an art form, the most forceful of them all. He was the living embodiment of soul.

Peter O'Toole was supremely talented, a unique leading man and one of the most charismatic actors of his generation. Described by his friend Richard Burton as "the most original actor to come out of Britain since the war," O'Toole was also unpredictable, with a dangerous edge he brought to his roles and to his real life. With the help of exclusive interviews with colleagues and close friends, Robert Sellers' Peter O'Toole: The Definitive Biography paints the first complete picture of this complex and much-loved man. The book reveals what drove him to extremes, why he drank to excess for many years and hated authority, but it also describes a man who was fiercely intelligent, with a great sense of humor and huge energy. Giving full weight to his extraordinary career, this is an insightful, funny, and moving tribute to an iconic actor who made a monumental contribution to theater and cinema.
 

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Richard A. Serrano's new book American Endurance: The Great Cowboy Race and the Vanishing Wild West is history, mystery, and Western all rolled into one. In June 1893, nine cowboys raced across a thousand miles of American prairie to the Chicago World's Fair. For two weeks they thundered past angry sheriffs, governors, and Humane Society inspectors intent on halting their race. Waiting for them at the finish line was Buffalo Bill Cody, who had set up his Wild West Show right next to the World's Fair that had refused to allow his exhibition at the fair. The Great Cowboy Race occurred at a pivotal moment in our nation's history: many believed the frontier was settled and the West was no more. The Chicago World's Fair represented the triumph of modernity and the end of the cowboy age. Except no one told the cowboys. Racing toward Buffalo Bill Cody and the gold-plated Colt revolver he promised to the first to reach his arena, nine men went on a Wild West stampede from tiny Chadron, Nebraska, to bustling Chicago. But at the first thud of hooves pounding on Chicago's brick pavement, the race devolved into chaos. Some of the cowboys shipped their horses part of the way by rail, or hired private buggies. One had the unfair advantage of having helped plan the route map in the first place. It took three days, numerous allegations, and a good old Western showdown to sort out who was first to Chicago, and who won the Great Cowboy Race.
 

No single sea battle has had more far-reaching consequences than the one fought in the harbor at Hampton Roads, Virginia, in March 1862. The Confederacy, with no fleet of its own, built an iron fort containing ten heavy guns on the hull of a captured Union frigate named the Merrimack. The North got word of the project when it was already well along, and, in desperation, commissioned an eccentric inventor named John Ericsson to build the Monitor, an entirely revolutionary iron warship—at the time, the single most complicated machine ever made. Abraham Lincoln himself was closely involved with the ship’s design. 

Killer instinct : a novel by Joseph Finder
Also available in: audiobook | large print

Jason Steadman is a thirty-year-old sales executive living in Boston and working for a electronics giant, a competitor to Sony and Panasonic. He's a witty, charismatic guy who's well liked at the office, but he lacks the "killer instinct" necessary to move up the corporate ladder. To the chagrin of his ambitious wife, it looks as if his career has hit a ceiling. Jason's been sidelined.But all that will change one evening when Jason meets Kurt Semko, a former Special Forces officer just back from Iraq. Looking for a decent pitcher for the company softball team, Jason gets Kurt, who was once drafted by the majors, a job in Corporate Security. Soon, good things start to happen for Jason - and bad things start to happen to Jason's rivals. His career suddenly takes off. He's an overnight successOnly too late does Jason discover that his friend Kurt has been secretly paving his path to the top by the most "efficient" - and ruthless - means available. After all, Kurt says, "Business is war, right?"But when Jason tries to put a stop to it, he finds that his new best friend has become the most dangerous enemy imaginable. And now it's far more than just his career that lies in the balance.A riveting tale of ambition, intrigue, and the price of success, Killer Instinct is Joseph Finder at his best.

Thorndyke Bear with Winter Clothes

Hey Kids,

In the winter months I like to dress in cozy clothes to keep warm. My favorite kind of warm weather clothes are the ones handmade by a favorite person, and some of my favorite stories to snuggle up with are about that cozy kind of creation. Read on for a list of a few knitting stories to share with a loved one. Don’t forget the fireplace and hot tea. 

Bear Hugs,

Thorndyke

The surprise by Sylvia van Ommen

In this wordless picture book, Sheep goes to great lengths to surprise Giraffe with a lovely red sweater.

Cat knit by Jacob Grant

Cat struggles to adjust and find a way to overcome his disappointment when his best friend, Yarn, is transformed into an itchy, stuffy sweater that Cat initially despises.

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