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As transcribed:

No Benefit

What possible benefit is there in setting aside a separate room - that has to be monitored - for adults to access pornography on the Internet? What possible good can come from this? What does this teach the children?

Is this all just an ego that says "I am more discerning than the rest of the country as to what the First Amendment says"? I will not use the Canton Library. I will strongly urge all my contacts within Canton to NOT support any millage for the library.

Jeanne Michelini
Canton

Library makes correct decision

From transcription:

The Canton Public Library's method of providing filtered Internet access for children and teens, and unfiltered access for adult in a separate, restricted setting offers the best of both worlds.

That's particularly true in the wake of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last week that upholds the Children's Internet Protection Act, signed into law by former President Bill Clinton in 2000.

The law requires public libraries that receive certain types of federal money to install filtering software to prevent access by minors to "inappropriate matter" on the Internet. In other words, the federal government says: Do what we think best or you won't get the money.

Filters, firewalls and smarts will help

Via Transcription:

By Joanne Maliszewski
Staff Writer

Carl Miller, Canton Public Library information technology specialist, offers some suggestions for parents who are interested in protecting their children from inappropriate material as they surf the Internet. His first suggestion, get a good filter software program. Listed below are some suggestions, with three Miller considers top notch: Cyber Patrol, Cybersitter, Net Nanny and Safe Surf. Bess, which is the filter used by the library, is a proxy server.

Miller also suggests installing a firewall. "Is it like a lead door. It is something that keeps the fire (junk) out. It can determine what is good and what isn't good." He suggests using Zone Alarm, which is a free version. Another brand is McAffee. But firewalls are not filters. "They protect against people on the Internet getting into your computer," Miller said.

what does your net filter know about your kids?

apple kidMany parents use web monitoring software to keep track of what their children do online - it's the next best thing to being there, right? Maybe not. The Associated Press reports that several major brands of this type of software offer kids' chat message logs to businesses hoping to tailor their marketing messages to children. There are some software companies that do not sell information to other businesses - you may want to check to see what practices your web monitoring software engages in. CPL also has lots of resources for parents and kids on Internet safety.