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Canton Seniors Book Discussion: September 26, 2013

Canton Seniors Book Group will meet on Thursday, September 26 from 2:00-3:00PM in Canton Public Library's Group Study Room A. We will be discussing The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey by Candace Millard. Copies of the book are distributed at the meeting or request a copy at the Adult Help Desk. No registration required.

River of doubt: Theodore Roosevelt's darkest journey by Candice Millard. The River of Doubt--it is a black, uncharted tributary of the Amazon that snakes through one of the most treacherous jungles in the world. Indians armed with poison-tipped arrows haunt its shadows; piranhas glide through its waters; boulder-strewn rapids turn the river into a roiling cauldron. After his humiliating election defeat in 1912, Roosevelt set his sights on the most punishing physical challenge he could find, the first descent of an unmapped, rapids-choked tributary of the Amazon. This is the true story of his journey.

Murder Will Out

Have you ever read a book, loved it, and can't understand why no one else has read this wonderful author? Here are some of my unknowns, or little knowns, you really should try: Deborah Grabien's JP Kincaid Chronicles, Luiz Alfredo Garcia-Roza's Brazilian Inspector Espinoza, Margaret Frazer's Joliffe series is a spin-off of the Sister Frevisse stories, and fans of Stieg Larsson's books should try Ake Edwardson's Inspector Erik Winter.

Rock & roll never forgets by Deborah Grabien

The silence of the rain by Luiz Alfredo Garcia-Roza

Henry Ford and Fordlandia

Fordlandia : the rise and fall of Henry Ford's forgotten jungle city by Greg Grandin documents Henry Ford's 1927 purchase of a Connecticut-sized plot of land in Brazil for the purpose of growing rubber. The South American leaf blight and the advent of synthetic rubbers forced the company to abandon Fordlandia in 1945, long after Ford had poured millions of dollars and years of strenuous effort into the project. Grandin argues that this was more than an economic venture. It was a missionary application of Ford-style capitalism--high wages, humane benefits, moral improvement to a backward land.