Tarzan

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Tarzan of the apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs

Raised by a fierce she-ape of the tribe of Kerchak deep in the African jungle, the baby Tarzan grew to learn the secrets of the wild to survive--how to talk with animals, swing through trees, and fight against the great predators. He grew to the strength and courage of his fellow apes. And in time, his human intelligence promised him the kingship of the tribe. He became truly Lord of the Jungle. Then civilized men entered the jungle, and Tarzan was forced to choose between two worlds.... 

In 1947, artist Jesse Marsh left Walt Disney Studios-where he had worked on Pinocchio, Fantasia, and various animated shorts to work for Western Publishing full time. Tarzan was one of his first assignments, with the iconic character's first original comic-book appearance in Dell Four-Color Comics #134. Tarzan #2 would begin Marsh's long-term collaboration with writer Gaylord DuBois. Their terrific work drew admiration and respect from readers and peers Russ Manning among them and Marsh's art inspired future comics! 

This second volume reproduces six big Golden Age issues for readers new and old to enjoy, and all stories are by the dynamite team of Gaylord DuBois and Jesse Marsh. DuBois and Marsh's nineteen-year collaboration on Tarzan produced a legendary body of work and an enduring vision of one of the world's foremost adventure icons. Marsh's art enthralled an entire generation of comics readers, influencing future creators the Hernandez brothers and earning the acclaim of such fellow professionals as Russ Manning and Alex Toth! 

When Tarzan of the Apes was published in The All-Story in 1912, Edgar Rice Burroughs was just another would-be writer struggling to support himself and his family by penning adventure stories for readers of "the pulps, " the cheap mass-market magazines popular at the time. When he died in 1950, he was the bestselling author of the twentieth century, overseeing interests that spanned publishing, movies, radio, newspaper syndication, toys, even real estate. He had millions of enthusiastic readers around the world and had earned the respect of magazines that never published his stories: The Saturday Evening Post admitted of Burroughs's writing, "There are pages of his books which have the authentic flash of storytelling genius." He was, in short, a publishing wonder who had unexpectedly created the century's first superhero, Tarzan -- a popculture icon that has known few rivals. 

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