Catalog

Search our Catalog

Mexico

El Día de los Muertos

When the Spanish Conquistadors first came to America, they found the Native Americans performed a ritual that seemed to mock death. Skulls were displayed as trophies and used to honor the dead during a month long ceremony. Today, in Mexico and the Southwest U.S., people don wooden skull masks called calacas and dance in honor of their deceased relatives. The wooden skulls are also placed on altars that are dedicated to the dead. Sugar skulls, made with the names of the dead person on the forehead, are eaten by a relative or friend. For books about this holiday, see:

Skulls to the living, bread to the dead: celebrations of death in Mexico and beyond by Stanley Brandes

Day of the Dead [Large print] by J.A. Jance — or regular print copy.

Books and DVDs on this topic can also be found in our Youth Department as well.

Mexico

Hola means hello in Spanish.  I just returned from a trip to Riveria Maya, Mexico.  I used Fodor's Mexico 2008 book to help plan my trip.  It was very helpful and gave me some great ideas for places to visit and things to do.