Catalog

Search our Catalog

women's history

Women's History Month

Pioneering women who led and won struggles for equality and civil rights; created and advanced educational and professional opportunities; and made great contributions to the arts, sciences and humanistic causes are honored each year during the month of March — National Women's History Month.

General History

Chronology of women worldwide: people, places & events that shaped women's history by Lynne Brakeman, editor ; Susan Gall, managing editor

Extraordinary women of the Medieval and Renaissance world: a biographical dictionary by Carole Levin ... [et al.]

Notable Black American women by Jessie Carney Smith, editor

Notable women in world government by edited by the editors of Salem Press

The reader's companion to U.S. women's history by editors, Wilma Mankiller ... [et al.]

Women in Science & Technology

The 2013 theme for National Women's History Month is "Women Inspiring Through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics." In that spirt, check out some of the following titles acknowledging the tremendous contributions of women to science and technology throughout history:

Jocelyn Elders, M.D.: from sharecropper's daughter to surgeon general of the United States of America by Joycelyn Elders and David Chanoff — Jocelyn Elders, pediatrician, public health administrator & the first woman Surgeon General of the United States


Beautiful: the life of Hedy Lamarr by Stephen Michael Shearer — Hedy Lamarr, actress, scientist, inventor & mathematician


Miss Leavitt's stars: the untold story of the woman who discovered how to measure the universe by George Johnson — Henrietta Swan Leavitt, groundbreaking American astronomer

Woman Suffrage Parade of 1913

This year is the 100th anniversary of the Woman Suffrage Parade organized by the suffragist Alice Paul. On March 3, 1913 more than 5,000 participants - including such notables as Helen Keller - marched down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C. in support of granting women the right to vote. However, it wasn't until August 26, 1920, with the passage of the 19th Amendment, that American women finally attained that goal.

25 Extraordinary Women from Past & Present

Celebrate Women's History Month by reading about one of the fascinating women below.

Madam Secretary by Madeleine Albright, with Bill Woodward — Madeleine Albright, Ambassador, first woman to become United States Secretary of State


Arbella: England's lost queen by Sarah Gristwood — Arbella, English Renaissance noblewoman

Meet the Women of the Civil War

Celebrating Extraordinary Women Throughout History

Marie Curie. Eleanor Roosevelt. Susan B. Anthony. Elizabeth I of England. Florence Nightingale. These remarkable women are well known to most of us, but there are many others in history just as remarkable whose names may not be as recognizable. In honor of Women's History Month we should all make some time to learn about them by reading some of the many biographies to found in the library's collection:

Bella Abzug: how one tough broad from the Bronx fought Jim Crow and Joe McCarthy, pissed off Jimmy Carter, battled for the rights of women and workers, rallied against war and for the planet, and shook up politics along the way: an oral history by Suzanne Braun Levine and Mary Thom — Bella Abzug, American lawyer, congresswoman and social activist

Jane Addams and the dream of American democracy: a life by Jean Bethke Elshtain — Jane Addams, American social reformer, suffrage leader and the first woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize

Anna of all the Russias: the life of Anna Akhmatova by Elaine Feinstein — Anna Akhmatova, Influential Russian poet

They could do it!

When the United States entered World War II, American men went into the military and American women filled their places in the offices and factories. "We can do it" was the slogan and Rosie the Riveter was the symbol of these working women. The American Rosie the Riveter Association has gathered together the stories of the "Rosies" and, thanks to a donation by a Rosie, the Canton Library has the set of these books.