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Ruins of Detroit

The ruins of Detroit by Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre; with essays by Robert Polidori and Thomas J. Sugrue; [translations by Sébastien de Villèle] Over the past generation Detroit has suffered economically and its urban decay is now glaringly apparent. The authors have documented this disintegration, showcasing with amazing photograhs structures that were formerly a source of civic pride.

Book Club in a Bag Kit

The omnivore's dilemma: a natural history of four meals by Michael Pollan. The bestselling author of The Botany of Desire explores the ecology of eating to unveil why we consume what. This title should provoke a lively discussion for your book group.

Canton Seniors Book Discussion: Fall 2010

We've moved! Beginning with the Canton Seniors Book Group's Wednesday, November 17 meeting, the group will meet at the Canton Public Library in Group Study Room A, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Copies of THE RED TENT by Anita Diamant are available at the library, see an Adult Reference Librarian to pick up your copy.

The Madonnas of Leningrad: a novel by Debra Dean — (September 22, 2010) — You can pick up a copy of this book at the Adult Reference Desk beginning  Wednesday, August 25.

Busy Moms Book Club

The April title selection for the Busy Moms Book has been changed to Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace With Marriage by Elizabeth Gilbert. In the follow up to Eat, Pray, Love (2006), Gilbert examines her reluctant marriage to Felipe, the Brazilian businessman she met at the end of her post-divorce travels, and considers her doubts about the institution of marriage. Join us Thursday April 15th in the Children's Purple Room at 11 am for what should be an interesting discussion.

Year 2007 Top Nonfiction Picks

Agent Zigzag: A True Story of Nazi Espionage, Love and Betrayal by Ben Macintyre: In 1941, after training as a German spy in occupied France, Chapman parachuted into Britain with a revolver, a wireless and a cyanide pill, with orders from the Abwehr to blow up an airplane factory. Instead, he contacted MI5, the British Secret Service. For the next four years, Chapman worked as a double agent, a lone British spy at the heart of the German Secret Service.

A Charmed Life: Growing Up in MacBeth's Castle by Liza Campbell: The daughter of a titled Scottish father recounts the horrors of her childhood in spite of popular beliefs about her fairy-tale lifestyle, describing her father's struggles with alcoholism that resulted in numerous brushes with death and the loss of his family's legacy.

Year 2006 Top Nonfiction Picks

All Governments Lie! The Life and Times of Rebel Journalist I. F. Stone by Myra MacPherson: Always skeptical, "All governments lie, but disaster lies in wait for countries whose officials smoke the same hashish they give out," he memorably quipped. I. F. Stone was ahead of the pack on the most pivotal 20th-century trends: Hitler and the rise of Fascism, the Cold War, Vietnam, and Reaganomics.

Year 2005 Top Nonfiction Picks

Woman in the Mirror by Richard Avedon: An unparalleled portrait of women brings together 125 tritone photographs, taken over a tumultuous half century of changing social institutions and values, cultural ideals, popular styles, and high fashion, accompanied by an incisive essay on the life and work of the great photographer.

I'm Not the New Me by Wendy McClure: A humorous but poignant chronicle of the American weight-loss culture draws on the author's online sites Pound and Candyboots to describe her battle with self-esteem and weight, from dealing with a family legacy of fat and drastic surgery, developing self-confidence, to struggling to understand oneself both after the weight loss and if you gain it back.

Year 2004 Top Nonfiction Picks

Burned Alive by Souad: A memoir by a young Jordanian woman who was the victim of an "honor crime" describes how she was nearly killed by her own family, her struggle to survive critical burns after being set on fire, and her determination to build a new life for herself.

Candyfreak: A Journey Through the Chocolate Underbelly of America by Steve Almond: After confessing to being a lifelong chocoholic, the aptly named Almond traces the history and bittersweet business practices of the companies producing those addictive candy bars.

The Complete Cartoons of the New Yorker edited by Robert Mankoff: Showcases the work of hundreds of artists who have contributed to the magazine throughout its 80-year history.

Year 2003 Top Nonfiction Picks

All the Shah's Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror by Stephen Kinzer: Traces the events leading to the 1953 coup in Iran and it's consequences, discussing the covert operations under the joint authority of Eisenhower and Churchill involving prime minister Mossadegh and CIA officer Roosevelt.

Best Food Writing 2003 edited by Holly Hughes: The very best writing about food is found in this wonderfully crafted annual collection of culinary essays that includes the work of John Thorne, Amanda Hesser, and Calvin Trillin, among others.

Year 2002 Top Nonfiction Picks

A Thousand Days in Venice by Marlena de Blasi: It's a love story between two middle-aged people from different cultures. She moves to Venice to marry a man she's only known for a few months. It's well written, insightful and has some great recipes in it. She is a former food writer and chef and they now do gastronomic tours in Tuscany.

Paranoid Parenting: Why Ignoring The Experts May Be Best For Your Child by Frank Furedi: Hardly a day goes by without parents being warned of a new threat to their children's well being. Everything is dangerous: the crib, the babysitter, the school, the supermarket, and the park. Paranoid Parenting suggests that parental anxieties themselves are the worst influence on children.