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Non-fiction

Nonfiction Book Group November 2014

Join us for the first meeting of the Nonfiction Book Group.
 
On Saturday, November 15 from 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM we will be discussing:

The monuments men: Allied heroes, Nazi thieves, and the greatest treasure hunt in history by Robert M. Edsel with Bret Witter — While Hitler was attempting to take over the western world, his armies were methodically seeking and hoarding the finest art treasures in Europe. The Fuehrer had begun cataloging the art he planned to collect as well as the art he would destroy: "degenerate" works he despised. In a race against time, behind enemy lines, often unarmed, a special force of American and British museum directors, curators, art historians, and others, called the Momuments Men, risked their lives to prevent the destruction of thousands of years of culture.

Gunfight at the O.K. Corral

It was on October 26, 1881 in Tombstone, Arizona that the infamous gunfight took place. Generally regarded as the most famous gunfight in the history of the American West, it is believed to have lasted all of thirty seconds. On one side were the cowboy outlaws Billy Clairborne, Ike and Billy Clanton, and Tom and Frank McLaury. Opposing them were Marshall Virgil Earp and his brothers Morgan and Wyatt, as well as Doc Holliday. Hollywood versions of the gun battle can be found in the films My Darling Clementine (1946), Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957) and Tombstone (1993). Find out what the fight was really all about and who survived by checking out some of the following books and dvds from the Library's collection:

The last gunfight: the real story of the shootout at the O.K. Corral and how it changed the American West by Jeff Guinn

And die in the West: the story of the O.K. Corral gunfight by Paula Mitchell Marks

New Books on the Biography Shelf

Augustus: first emperor of Rome by Adrian Goldsworthy


The Roosevelts: an intimate history by Geoffrey C. Ward ; based on a documentary film by Ken Burns ; with a preface by Ken Burns ; picture research by Susanna Steisel ; design by Maggie Hinders


Tennessee Williams: mad pilgrimage of the flesh by John Lahr


Cosby: his life and times by Mark Whitaker


Death of a king: the real story of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s final year by Tavis Smiley with David Ritz

New Book Club in a Bag Kit

The antidote: happiness for people who can't stand positive thinking [kit] by Oliver Burkeman — Burkeman introduces us to a group of people who share a surprising way of thinking about life. Whether experimental psychologists, terrorism experts, Buddhists, hardheaded business consultants, Greek philosophers, or modern-day gurus, they argue that it's our constant effort to be happy that is making us miserable. Their alternative path to happiness and success involves embracing failure, pessimism, and uncertainty--the very things we spend our lives trying to avoid.

What We're Reading: October 2014

Lately, I've been reading non-fiction. A well-written narrative not only informs, it entertains.  Did you know Canton Public Library has a new book discussion group?  The Nonfiction Book Group will meet the third Saturday of the month.  Their first meeting is November 15 at 10:00 AM.

The First World War in 100 objects by John Hughes-Wilson ; IWM consultant, Nigel Steel ; editor, Mark Hawkins-Dady

The history of rock 'n' roll in ten songs by Greil Marcus

Music in the shadows: noir musical films by Sheri Chinen Biesen

Seven elements that changed the world: an adventure of ingenuity and discovery by John Browne

In the kingdom of ice: the grand and terrible polar voyage of the USS Jeannette by Hampton Sides

The Great Chicago Fire

The Great Chicago Fire burned from Sunday, October 8 to Tuesday, October 10, 1871. The fire started in or around a barn on DeKoven Street, but despite the fact that the O'Leary family lived in the area, the legend of Mrs. O'Leary's cow kicking over a lantern is probably just that - a legend. More than 300 people died in the fire, 100,000 were left homeless, and four square miles of the city were destroyed. Although the Chicago fire, perhaps, the most well known from in American history, there have been significant fires in other major cities as well - Boston, Pittsburgh and Detroit included. To learn more about them check out Seven Fires: the Urban Infernos that Shaped America.

The great fire by Jim Murphy

Smoldering city: Chicagoans and the Great Fire, 1871- 1874 by Karen Sawislak

City of the century: the epic of Chicago and the making of America by Donald L. Miller

City of big shoulders: a history of Chicago by Robert G. Spinney

Hockey's Back!

Get ready for this year's exciting hockey season by reading about some  of it's greatest stars - both on and off the ice!

Orr: my story by Bobby Orr


Mr. Hockey: My Story by Howe, Gordie


Steve Yzerman: heart of a champion by Joe Falls ... [et al.] ; edited by Francis J. Fitzgerald


Total Gretzky: the magic, the legend, the numbers by edited by Steve Dryden

Thorndyke Thoughts

Hey Kids,

Because of my superior location near the New Book shelves, I get first crack at the new items that come in, including the chapter books, the picture books, even nonfiction and biographies. Did you know that a biography is a book about a real person? Today I snuck a new biography about Peter Roget, the person who made Roget’s Thesaurus. Guess what? A thesaurus is not a dinosaur. It’s a list of words, and the ones that mean the same thing are all grouped together. Peter Roget always made lists of things, from when he was a very little boy, and one day those lists became his first thesaurus. 

You can even browse a version of Roget’s Thesaurus online.

The right word: Roget and his thesaurus by Jen Bryant, author ; Melissa Sweet, illustrator


Find other fascinating stories about real people in the J Biography section at the back of the Children’s Department, or ask a Children's Librarian.

 

Italian-American Heritage Month

About 5.5 million Italians immigrated to the United States between 1820 and 2004. The greatest surge occurred between 1880 and 1920 when more than 4 million Italians came to America. October is the time to celebrate the many achievements and contributions of Americans of Italian descent in all walks of life.

New Documentaries on the Shelf

Boredom [videodisc]


Racing dreams [videodisc]: coming of age in a fast world by produced by Bristol Baughan, Marshall Curry ; written and directed by Marshall Curry


21 great wonders of the world [videodisc]


GMO OMG [videodisc] by a Compeller Pictures production ; in association with Heartworn Pictures ; presented by Nature's Path ; produced by Joshua A. Kunau ; written and directed by Jeremy Seifert


Freedom summer [videodisc] by Corporation for Public Broadcasting

California Statehood

California was admitted to the United States on September 9, 1850. Originally colonized by the Spanish in the 17th century, it became part of Mexico in 1821. In 1846, a group of American settlers declared an independent California Repulic shortly after the beginning of the Mexican-American War. The California Gold Rush of 1848 led to a huge increase in Califronia's population and started an economic boom. Some of the many figures connected to the state's rich and complicated history include Sir Francis Drake, Junipero Serra, John Fremont, Leland Stanford, Upton Sinclair, and William Randolph Hearst. Learn more:

What We're Reading: September, 2014

This month is a mix of history, mystery, a book about books and reading, growing old, and second chances.

Can't we talk about something more pleasant? by Roz Chast

The Mountaintop School for Dogs and other second chances by Ellen Cooney

The 40s: the story of a decade by The New Yorker ; edited by Henry Finder with Giles Harvey ; introduction by David Remnick

The shelf: from LEQ to LES by Phyllis Rose

Buried in a bog by Sheila Connolly

Labor Day

This legal holiday is celebrated in the United States on the first Monday of every September. The first Labor Day celebration dates back to a parade in New York on Tuesday, September 5, 1882. More than half the states were celebrating Labor Day by 1893, but it wasn't made a national holiday until June 28, 1894, when President Grover Cleveland signed it into law.

Books

Reference

Historical encyclopedia of American labor by edited by Robert Weir and James P. Hanlan

Labor conflict in the United States: an encyclopedia by edited by Ronald L. Filippelli — editorial assistant, Carol Reilly

US Labor History

Bread--and roses: the struggle of American labor, 1865- 1915 by Milton Meltzer — illustrated with contemporary prints & photographs — Using diaries, newspaper reports and other source material, the author shows the industrialization of America and the workers' struggle for higher working standards.

Child labor: an American history by Hugh D. Hindman — This book considers the issue of child labor as a social and economic problem in America from an historical perspective — as it was found in major American industries and occupations, including coal mines, cotton textile mills and sweatshops, in the early 1900s.