Physics

STEM Curiosity

Image of head with science related objects floating in a thought bubble inside

Kids aged 7-10 who are interested in science, technology, engineering, and math are first introduced to a topic and the science behind it. After learning about the sessions' topic, participants will be given a problem and challenged to engineer a solution to it individually and as teams. 

Registration is Required

 

Upcoming sessions

Monday, August 20 - 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM Friends' Activity Room Hydrology & Water Quality
Saturday, September 15 - 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM Friends' Activity Room The Physics of Music
Saturday, October 6 - 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM Community Room International Space Week

Richard Feynman once quipped: "Time is what happens when nothing else does." But Julian Barbour disagrees: if nothing happened, if nothing changed, time would stop. For time is nothing but change. It is change that we perceive occurring all around us, not time. In fact, time doesn't exist. In this highly provocative volume, Barbour presents the basic evidence for the nonexistence of time, explaining what a timeless universe is like and showing how the world will nonetheless be experienced as intensely temporal.

What do snowflakes, mirrors, and the universe as a whole have in common? Physicist Dave Goldberg takes readers on a warp-speed road trip guided by the notion that while randomness may seem to rule our lives, it never seems to erase an essential orderliness. Space, time, and everything in between in our elegant universe - from the Higgs boson to antimatter to the most massive group of galaxies - are shaped by hidden symmetries

pioneering theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss explains the groundbreaking new scientific advances that turn the most basic philosophical questions on their heads. One of the few prominent scientists today to have actively crossed the chasm between science and popular culture, Krauss reveals that modern science is addressing the question of why there is something rather than nothing, with surprising and fascinating results. The staggeringly beautiful experimental observations and mind-bending new theories are all described accessibly in A Universe from Nothing, and they suggest that not only can something arise from nothing, something will always arise from nothing. 

Great Discoveries in Physics

It was 100 years ago this year, in 1913, that physicist Niels Bohr discovered the quantum atom (i.e the atomic nucleus in the center with the electrons in orbit around it). For this work he received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1922. In honor of this goundbreaking event read about some of the other amazing discoveries by physicists throughout history:

American Prometheus: the triumph and tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer by Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin

The Curies: a biography of the most controversial family in science by Denis Brian

Neutrinos Traveling Faster Than Light?

The physics world is abuzz with news that a group of European physicists has clocked a burst of subatomic particles known as neutrinos breaking the speed of light that was calculated by Albert Einstein in 1905, according to the New York Times. Was Albert Einstein wrong to think that the speed of light was the ultimate speed? Does this mean that time-travel will become a possibility?

Neutrino by Frank Close

New Views of the Universe

Looking for the latest groundbreaking books providing a new take on some of cosmology's most profound questions? If you want to tour some of the strange and wonderful universes that modern physics posits that just might-be out there, turn to our latest collection of titles.

Cycles of time: an extraordinary new view of the universe by Roger Penrose

The book of universes: exploring the limits of the cosmos by John D. Barrow

The grand design by Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow

Once before time: a whole story of the universe by Martin Bojowald

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