Michigan history

Even More Fascinating Michigan History

Michigan by David Lee Poremba

Bold women in Michigan history by Virginia Law Burns

Bath massacre: America's first school bombing by Arnie Bernstein

Lives and legends of the Christmas tree ships by Fred Neuschel

Eyes on fire: witnesses to the Detroit Riot of 1967 by edited by Heather Buchanan, Sharon Stanford, Teresa Kimble

Ethnic Michigan

Michigan has a rich history of ethnic diversity. Early European explorers were met by the most populous Native American tribes of the Ottawa, Potawatomi, and the Ojibwa (or Chippewa) people. Later, in the 17th century, the French voyageurs explored and settled in Michigan. These included Etienne Brule, Jacques Marquette, and Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac, the founder of the city of Detroit. However, over time large populations of various European, Middle Eastern, and Asian ethnicities have emigrated to our state. Find out more about the people who have contributed to Michigan's growth and culture.
 

Arab Americans in Metro Detroit: a pictorial history by Anan Ameri ; Yvonne Lockwood

More Fascinating Michigan History

Michigan remembered: photographs from the Farm Security Administration and the Office of War Information, 1936- 1943 by edited by Constance B. Schulz ; with introductory essays by Constance B. Schulz and William H. Mulligan, Jr

Father Abraham's children: Michigan episodes in the Civil War by Frank B. Woodford ; new foreword by Arthur M. Woodford

A drive down memory lane: the named state and federal highways of Michigan by LeRoy Barnett

Picturing Hemingway's Michigan by Michael R. Federspiel

Fascinating Michigan History

Traveling through time: a guide to Michigan's historical markers by edited by Laura Rose Ashlee

Michigan, the Great Lakes state: an illustrated history by George S. May, JoEllen Vinyard

The sweetness of freedom: stories of immigrants by Stephen Garr Ostrander & Martha Aladjem Bloomfield

Michigan ghost towns of the Upper Peninsula by compiled by Roy L. Dodge

The Underground Railroad in Michigan by Carol E. Mull

Michigan Notable Books

Michigan Notable Bookmark: bookmarkThe Michigan Notable Books Program has selected 20 books for 2012 celebrating Michigan people, places and events. The majority of these titles are available at Canton Library and libraries across the state. For a free bookmark listing these titles, stop by the Adult Help Desk. For more information on the Michigan Notable Books Program, see michigan.gov/notable books 

Happy 175th Anniversary Michigan

Guess what? Our beloved mitten state is celebrating a major milestone Thursday — 175 years of Statehood! Time does fly, doesn't it? We've seen both good and bad events in our historical journey through time, plus we have given birth to numerous famous people. On this date in 1837, President Jackson signed the bill that officially made us the 26th state in the union. There are lots of ways you can celebrate this momentous occasion including baking a cake shaped like Michigan, take pictures of your neighborhood, write what you love about our great state, or check out some of our wonderful materials on Michigan.

Michigan in the Civil War

More than 90,000 Michigan men — nearly a quarter of the state's male population in 1860 — served in the United States Civil War. Over 14,000 Michigan soldiers died in the service of their country — roughly 1 of every 6 who served. Michigan supplied a large number of troops and several generals, including George Armstrong Custer's Michigan Wolverine Cavalry. In all, Michigan fielded 31 Regiments of Infantry, 11 Regiments of Cavalry, 14 batteries of Artillery, 1 regiment of Sharpshooters, and 1 regiment of Engineers. Among the more celebrated units was the 24th Michigan Volunteer Infantry, which suffered heavy losses at the Battle of Gettysburg. To find out more about Michigan's Civil War history check out the following books, DVDs, and websites:

150th Anniversary of the Civil War

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the start of U.S. Civil War. The first shots were fired on April 12, 1861 at Fort Sumter in South Carolina's Charleston Harbor. It raged on for four more years until Robert E. Lee surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant on April 9, 1865 at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia. You can learn about Michigan's involvement — by both the military and the civilians — through the eyes of Michigan's Senator Jacob M. Howard who represented Michigan in Congress from 1862 to 1871. The senator will be portrayed by David Tennies, a local Civil War historian and reenactor. Join us on Tuesday evening, June 14 from 7-8:30PM for what should be a fascinating encounter. No registration is required.

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