May We Suggest

The British Burn Washington

Two hundred years ago this year, during the War of 1812,  the British army occupied Washington, setting fire to many public buildings, including  the White House and the Capitol. It was on  August 24, 1814, that approximately 4.000 troops entered the city, causing most of the residents to flee. A warning was dispatched to First Lady Dolley Madison who managed to escape across the Potomac River with a portrait of George Washington in tow. This was the only time since the American Revolution that a foreign power has captured the United States capital.
 

The burning of Washington: the British invasion of 1814 by Anthony S. Pitch

 

 

World War I: the Americans

Although the United States did not enter the war until 1917, the American Expeditionary Force suffered 320,500 casualties. In memory of the 100th anniversary of the war read about some of these brave men and women:
 

Yanks: the epic story of the American Army in World War I by John S.D. Eisenhower with Joanne Thompson Eisenhower

 

Five lieutenants: the heartbreaking story of five Harvard men who led America to victory in World War I by James Carl Nelson

 

The long way home: an American journey from Ellis Island to the Great War by David Laskin

 

 

 

 

American women in World War I: they also served by Lettie Gavin

 

 

 

 

World War I: the Campaigns

The battles of World War I were fought in Europe, the  Middle East, and the Pacific. In memory of the war's 100th anniversary, check out some of the library's many resources on this global event whose repercussions are still being felt today:
 

To conquer hell: the Meuse-Argonne, 1918 by Edward G. Lengel

 

 

Verdun: the longest battle of the Great War by Paul Jankowski

 

 

 

Castles of steel: Britain, Germany, and the winning of the Great War at sea by Robert K. Massie

 

 

 

Yanks: the epic story of the American Army in World War I by John S.D. Eisenhower with Joanne Thompson Eisenhower

 

 

 

Even More Fascinating Michigan History

Michigan by David Lee Poremba

Bold women in Michigan history by Virginia Law Burns

Bath massacre: America's first school bombing by Arnie Bernstein

Lives and legends of the Christmas tree ships by Fred Neuschel

Eyes on fire: witnesses to the Detroit Riot of 1967 by edited by Heather Buchanan, Sharon Stanford, Teresa Kimble

Ethnic Michigan

Michigan has a rich history of ethnic diversity. Early European explorers were met by the most populous Native American tribes of the Ottawa, Potawatomi, and the Ojibwa (or Chippewa) people. Later, in the 17th century, the French voyageurs explored and settled in Michigan. These included Etienne Brule, Jacques Marquette, and Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac, the founder of the city of Detroit. However, over time large populations of various European, Middle Eastern, and Asian ethnicities have emigrated to our state. Find out more about the people who have contributed to Michigan's growth and culture.
 

Arab Americans in Metro Detroit: a pictorial history by Anan Ameri ; Yvonne Lockwood

Michigan Critters

 

The amphibians and reptiles of Michigan: a Quaternary and Recent faunal adventure by J. Alan Holman

 

 

 

Birds of Detroit by Chris C. Fisher, Allen T. Chartier

 

 

 

 

Fish of Michign field guide by David Bosanko

 

 

 

 

The wolves of Isle Royale: a broken balance by Rolf O. Peterson

 

 

 

 

Fowl weather by Bob Tarte

 

 

 

 

Michigan Historical Fiction

 

 

Detroit breakdown by D.E. Johnson — Detroit, 1912.

 

 

 

The Detroit electric scheme by D. E. Johnson — Detroit, 1910.

 

 

 

The expeditions: a novel by Karl Iagnemma — Michigan Territory, 1844.

 

 

 

Grand River and Joy by Susan Messer — Detroit, 1967.

 

 

 

Looking for Przybylski by K.C. Frederick — Detroit, mid-1970s.

 

 

 

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