1950s

Expand your mind.  What's it like to go to war?  Why do Americans move so frequently?  A brilliant neurosurgeon learns he has inoperable cancer, read how he decides to meet this challenge.  Women 'rocket sciences'? Yes!

The average restless American will move 11.7 times in a lifetime. For Melody Warnick, it was move #6, from Austin, Texas, to Blacksburg, Virginia, that threatened to unhinge her. In the lonely aftermath of unpacking, she wondered : Aren't we supposed to put down roots at some point? How does the place we live become the place we want to stay? This time, she had an epiphany. Rather than hold her breath and hope this new town would be her family's perfect fit, she would figure out how to fall in love with it-- no matter what. How we come to feel at home in our towns and cities is what Warnick sets out to discover.

"From master storyteller and historian H.W. Brands, twice a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, comes the riveting story of how President Harry Truman and General Douglas MacArthur squared off to decide America's future in the aftermath of World War II. At the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, 'The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has.' This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. Heir to a struggling economy, a ruined Europe, and increasing tension with the Soviet Union, on no issue was the path ahead clear and easy. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The lessons he drew from World War II were absolute: appeasement leads to disaster and a showdown with the communists was inevitable--the sooner the better. In the nuclear era, when the Soviets, too, had the bomb, the specter of a catastrophic third World War lurked menacingly close on the horizon. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. From the drama of Stalin's blockade of West Berlin to the daring landing of MacArthur's forces at Inchon to the shocking entrance of China into the war, The General and the President vividly evokes the making of a new American era"--.

In the 1940s and 50s, when the newly minted Jet Propulsion Laboratory needed quick-thinking mathematicians to calculate velocities and plot trajectories, they recruited an elite group of young women -- known as human computers -- who, with only pencil, paper, and mathematical prowess, transformed rocket design, helped bring about the first American ballistic missiles. But they were never interested in developing weapons, their hearts lay in the dream of space exploration. So when the JPL became part of a new agency called NASA, the women worked on the first probes to the moon, Venus, Mars, and beyond. Later, as digital computers largely replaced human ones, JPL was unique in training and retaining its brilliant pool of women. They became the first computer programmers and engineers, and through their efforts, we launched the ships that showed us the contours of our solar system. Rise of the Rocket Girls tells the stories of these women who broke the boundaries of both gender and science.

Savvy Seniors: August, 2014

10 Movie Favorites of baby boomers according to a recent blog posted on Next Avenue's Route 360 by Linda Bernstein. Best part of the survey?  The memorable lines included. 

The sound of music [videodisc] by Twentieth Century Fox

The graduate [videodisc] by an Embassy Pictures release

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid [videodisc] by Twentieth Century Fox


Love story [videodisc]
by Paramount Pictures

The Godfather [videodisc] by [by] Mario Puzo ; Paramount Pictures presents an Albert S. Ruddy production

Time Capsule Unearthed!

We have unearthed a time capsule containing artifacts from the 1950s, 60s, and 70s. The capsule and all the items are on display in the library showcase! Use your keen eyesight, brain power, and research ability to answer questions related to these antiquated objects. Give yourself a chance to win a prize by returning the answer sheet to the Help Desk! The lucky winner will be notified.

Book Club Choices July 2012

The perfect book for a book discussion is one that's not too easy, not too hard, that will hold the interest of a diverse group of readers and will also inspire a lively discussion. For additional book club resources try the Canton Public Library's Book Club in a Bag kits:

City of dreams: a novel of Nieuw Amsterdam and early Manhattan by Beverly Swerling

Light on snow: a novel by Anita Shreve

The book thief [sound recording] by Markus Zusak

The guardian by Dee Henderson

War trash [Large print] by Ha Jin

What We're Reading: August, 2011

Year 2010 Top Fiction Picks

The weed that strings the hangman's bag : a Flavia de Luce mystery by Alan Bradley

The girl who kicked the hornet's nest by Stieg Larsson ; translated from the Swedish by Reg Keeland

In the company of others by Jan Karon

The three Weissmanns of Westport by Cathleen Schine

Spooner by Pete Dexter

The irresistible Henry House : a novel by Lisa Grunwald

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